Graduate Course Descriptions

Western New Mexico University does not offer all the classes listed in this catalog every semester or every year.

The following pages provide brief descriptions of course offerings. Course listings are subject to change. Each semester the university publishes a schedule of classes which provides a detailed listing of courses offered and the times and places of instruction. Courses listed in the schedule

of classes are subject to change.

EXPLANATORY NOTES Numbering of Courses

Course numbering is based on the content level of material presented in courses.

Courses numbered:

100-299 . . . primarily for freshmen and soph

omores. 300-499 . . . primarily for juniors and seniors. 500-599 . . . primarily for students enrolled

in master’s degree programs or the equivalent. Undergraduate students may enroll if they have submitted and received approval on a Petition for Undergraduate Student to Register for Graduate Course form.

444 & 544, Courses are for professional 545 development only, not degree credit.

Variable credit courses

(1-3) indicates variable credit, the minimum and maximum credit limitations per semester are shown. An example:

MATH 580. Workshop in Mathematics.

Theory and practical application of a relevant mathematics topic. (1-3)

Cross-listed courses:

Courses in which students may earn credit under either of two disciplines (e.g., SOC or HIST) for the same offering.

Corequisite: A requirement which must be taken concurrently with another course.

Prerequisite:

A requirement which must be fulfilled before a student can enroll in a particular course. Permission of the instructor for a student to attend a class is implied when the student has met the prerequisites specified by the department. A student who has not fulfilled any prerequisites for a course may be dropped by the instructor of the course.

Cancellation of courses: The university reserves the right to cancel courses that do not meet enrollment minimums or are not suitably staffed by qualified faculty.

KEYS TO SYMBOLS

Course descriptions include a variety of (symbols conveying essential information. The following standard course description with explanation of symbols serves as a model:

BSAD 333. Cost Accounting. The costs of production processing and construction of manufactured goods; designed to show how accounting can serve as a means of control. Prerequisites: BSAD 230 and 231. Fall only. (3)

BSAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . department name

333 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . course number Cost Accounting . . . . . . . course title “The costs of...’’ . . . . . . . explanation of

course content

Prerequisite: BSAD 230 . required to be taken before a student can enroll in a particular course

Fall only . . . . . . . . . . . . . taught Fall semester

(3). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . number of credits

Note: not all of the above information may be noted in each course.

Art

ART 525. Elementary Art Methods. Explores the importance of art in the classroom and in society. It promotes understanding of the art needs and abilities of children, grades K-6. This course provides future teachers with professional skills, methods, and experiences in teaching toward those needs and abilities. (3)

ART 550. Secondary Art Methods. Explores the importance of art in the secondary curriculum, and in society. It promotes understanding of the art needs and abilities of adolescents, grades 7-12. This course provides future teachers with professional skills, methods, and experiences to teach art at the secondary level. (3)

ART 577. Graduate Seminar. Lecture/discussion course which unites students from different areas of art specialization into a forum. Students focus on pertinent issues in art through discussion, research and presentations. This course may be repeated 3 times. Prerequisites: two graduate studio Art courses. Spring only. (1)

ART 580. Art Workshop. Intensive workshops of varying lengths with visiting professors or of a specialized nature, including national or international travel study tours, to supplement the regular curriculum. (1-6)

*ART 578, 579, 583, 584, 586, 587, 588, 589. Studio work. ART 578 Graphic Design; ART 579 Clay; ART 583 Painting; ART 584 Printmaking; ART 586 Drawing; ART 587 Sculpture; ART 588 Photography; ART 589 Papermaking. Students may register only by permission of the professor under whom they will study. Courses may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. (4 each)

ART 593. Graduate Exhibit and Final Portfolio Review. The Graduate Exhibition is the final assessment of the student’s level of personal development, aesthetic growth and professional talent. The student will take on all the responsibility of the exhibit. (1)

ART 595. Tutorial Reading. (1-3)

*NOTE. Studio work courses are concurrent offerings with 400 level studio work courses.

Bilingual Education

BLED 501. Current Issues in Language Minority Education. This meets the requirements for a foundation course for the bilingual and TESOL endorsements. Recommended for all teachers, counselors, and educational administrators who work with language minority students, families, and communities. (3)

BLED 514. Multicultural Education. This is an education foundations course for Teacher Education, Bilingual Education and English as a Second Language education students. Students will participate in multicultural classroom practices that are grounded in the lives of students, critical, anti-racist, pro-justice, participatory, experiential, visionary, academically rigorous, and culturally sensitive. (3)

BLED 516. Indo-Chicano Cultures and Pedagogy. Contrasting culture patterns including an introduction to historical and sociological aspects of Indigenous and Chicano cultures: prepares the teacher trainee to present units on history, culture, folklore, fine arts and native traditions to students in the Southwest. (3)

BLED 517. Mexican Culture and Pedagogy. The major aspects of historical Mexican values, contributions, current social studies, history, art, and literature. (Taught in Spanish). Required for the bilingual endorsement. (3)

BLED 519. Navajo Culture and Pedagogy. The major aspects of historical Navajo values, contributions, current social studies, history, art, and literature. (Taught in Navajo). Required for the bilingual endorsement. (3)

BLED 521. Zuni Culture and Pedagogy. The major aspects of historical Zuni values, contributions, current social studies, history, art, and literature. (Taught in Zuni). Required for the bilingual endorsement. (3)

BLED 527. Linguistics 1 for L2 Teachers. Linguistics 1 for Second Language teachers is a review of the components of the science of language and how these relate to teaching the second language learner. Required for bilingual and TESOL teachers to work in ESL instruction with children, youth and adults. Recommended for all teachers. (3)

BLED 528. Linguistics 2 for L2 Teachers. Linguistics 2 for Second Language teachers covers sociolinguistics and/or phonetics, phonemics, articulatory phonetics, points and manner of articulation and how these relate to the second language learner, and the bilingual or bicultural child, or the elementary, secondary or adult student. This second level linguistics course prepares teachers to work in ESL instruction. (3)

BLED 531. Language Arts in Spanish. Survey of the needs, orientation, and approaches teachers should consider in class instruction for appropriate teaching of Spanish speaking students. Emphasis on Language Arts Instruction and Literacy Development. (3)

BLED 532. Language Arts in Zuni. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instruction for appropriate teaching of Zuni students. Emphasis on Language Arts Instruction and Literacy Development. (3)

BLED 533. Language Arts in Navajo. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instruction for appropriate teaching of Navajo students. Emphasis on Language Arts Instruction and Literacy Development. (3)

BLED 534. Content Literacy in Spanish. Specialized techniques used for teaching the Spanish speaking bilingual and bicultural child: emphasizes instruction in the content areas; required for the bilingual-bicultural programs. (3)

BLED 535. Content Literacy in Zuni. Specialized techniques used for teaching the Zuni bilingual and bicultural child: emphasizes instruction in the content areas; required for the bilingual-bicultural programs. (3)

BLED 536. Content Literacy in Navajo. Specialized techniques used for teaching the Navajo bilingual and bicultural child: emphasizes instruction in the content areas; required for the bilingual-bicultural programs. (3)

BLED 537. Teaching Reading in Spanish. Advanced course in teaching reading and writing in Spanish as a first or second language to children, youth or adults. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instructions for appropriate teaching of Hispanic students. (3)

BLED 538. Teaching Reading in Zuni. Advanced course in teaching reading and writing in Zuni as a first or second language to children, youth or adults. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instructions for appropriate teaching of Zuni students. (3)

BLED 539. Teaching Reading in Navajo. Advanced course in teaching reading and writing in Navajo as a first or second language to children, youth or adults. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instructions for appropriate teaching of Navajo students. (3)

BLED 541. English Language Acquisition & Development. The use of ESL techniques and strategies for the English language acquisition of English Language Learners; Required for TESOL endorsement. Recommended for Language Arts Endorsement and as an elective for all educators. (3)

BLED 545. ESL Methods for Content Literacy. Current trends, assessment, and sheltered instruction for literacy development of English Language Learners. Emphasis will be on meeting the standards and outcomes of the New Mexico TESOL endorsement for teaching content using ESL methods. (3)

Business

BSAD 500. Survey of Business I. A survey course in the basic concepts of accounting and finance. Each module of instruction is tested separately with proportionate weight to each topic for grading. (3)

BSAD 501. Survey of Business II. A survey course in business that includes 45 contact hours in marketing and management. (3)

BSAD 502 Survey of Math and Statistics for MBAs. A survey course of mathematics and statistics for those who do not have a strong mathematical background. This course will be optional at the discretion of the MBA advisor who may excuse engineers, math majors, science majors or others who have had adequate mathematical preparation as evidenced by their academic record. (3)

BSAD 510. Social Responsibility and Business Ethics. A study of selected contemporary issues facing American and international business and society via readings, discussions, research, and writing. A required course for the M.B.A. Summer only. (3)

BSAD 520. Business Negotiation. Provides the students with the diagnostic tools needed to choose effective bargaining strategies. Applies theory through case studies of read and simulated negotiations. Prerequisite: BSAD 350. An elective course offered summer only. (3)

BSAD 530. Advanced Managerial Accounting. An in-depth study of the information and reporting needs of contemporary management and the uses of accounting information in facilitating the planning, control and special decision-making functions of management. Prerequisites: BSAD 230, 231 or equivalent. A required course. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 535. Fraud Prevention and Detection. Explores various forms of employee and financial statement fraud. Identifies symptoms of fraud and measures management can use to prevent fraud. (3)

BSAD 540. Analysis for Marketing Planning. Marketing behavior of the firm, with emphasis on models of pricing, product development, and promotional decisions based on consumer demand analysis. Prerequisite: BSAD 340 or equivalent. A required course. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 542. Seminar in Marketing Management. An in-depth analysis of all phases of marketing and its role in the firm and in society. Prerequisite: BSAD 540. An elective course offered on occasion in the summer. (3)

BSAD 550. Management and Organizational Theory. Situational analysis of organizational variables such as goals, tasks, structure, technology/culture conflict communication, and power. Prerequisite: BSAD 350 or equivalent. A required course. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 551. Advanced Management. A case problem or project approach to the study of management focusing on the strengths, weaknesses, threats, and opportunities that many of today’s firms face; emphasizes contemporary management issues in multi-national as well as small business organizations. Prerequisite: BSAD 550. An elective course; offered on occasion in the summer. (3)

BSAD 552. Human Resource Management. A study of current theoretical and practical issues in human resource management to include areas of study such as equal employment opportunity, staffing the organization, training and developing employees, compensation and rewards program and unionization. A required course. (3)

BSAD 556. Production and Operations Analysis. The production function of business is defined. Production management models such as linear programming and TQM are applied to real situations through case analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 121, 221 and 321 or equivalent. A required course. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 560. Advanced Business Statistics. Applications of statistical techniques to business practices, including use of statistical packages with computers. Prerequisites: MATH 121, 221, and 321, or equivalent. A required course. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 562. Advanced MIS. Introduction to the concepts of MIS from a user’s perspective; a non-computer technical course; requires a research project in MIS. Prerequisite: CMPS 405 or equivalent. An elective course; offered occasionally in the summer. (3)

BSAD 570. Managerial Finance in Theory and Practice. Concepts and techniques employed in determination of optimal capital structures, procurement of resources, financial markets, and allocation of resources to productive investments. Prerequisite: BSAD 370 or equivalent. A required course Spring only. (3)

BSAD 571. Problems in Finance. A case problem approach to financial policy and strategy, emphasizing acquisition, allocation, and management of funds within the business enterprise. Prerequisite: BSAD 570. An elective course; offered on occasion in the summer. (3)

BSAD 578. Special Graduate Topics in Business. A seminar course on a specialized topic in business; offered when mutual interest exists for a member of the business faculty or an adjunct faculty member and sufficient number of graduate students; will not duplicate existing course offerings. An elective course; offered on occasion in the summer. (3)

BSAD 585. Directed Study in Business. Independent study of a special topic under the supervision of a member of the department’s graduate faculty. (3)

BSAD 586. Advanced International Business. A study of the international business environments within which business firms operate and the public policies and cultures which influence their activities; includes international finance, legal issues, management, and marketing considerations of the international, transnational, multinational, and global firms. A required course; offered in the spring. (3)

BSAD 589. Economic Development. An intensive one-week course designed to provide training in the basics of economic development in accordance with curriculum requirements prepared by the American Economic Development Council. Subject material is both theoretical and practical with an emphasis on economic development and its place in New Mexico. Summer only. (3)

BSAD 590. Directed Research in Business. Independent guided research on a topic under the supervision of a member of the department’s graduate faculty. (3)

BSAD 597. Managerial Policy and Strategy. The study of how to align the firm in a changing business environment; study of policies designed to coordinate all functions of business enterprise from the viewpoint of the chief operating executive; emphasizes appropriate tools of analysis and simplicity. This course cannot be taken until the student has completed twelve semester hours of the M.B.A. program. A required course. Spring only. (3)

Chemical Dependency

CHDP 503. Advanced Helping Skills in Chemical Dependency. Examines the helping relationship, including skills relevant to working with persons affected by chemical dependency. The course will examine qualities of a functional helping relationship and social-psychological issues involved in working with the chemically dependent person. Prerequisites: CHDP 304. (3)

CHDP 504. Professional Principles in Chemical Dependency. Provides an understanding of the professional principles of chemical dependency counseling; examines the 12 core functions, ethical and legal issues, and special issues essential for chemical dependency counseling. Prerequisites: CHDP 304, 306, and 307. (3)

CHDP 508. Annual Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors Institute. Provides state-of-the-art information, training and techniques in the field of substance abuse counseling. Multiculturalism, gender, age and other elements of diversity are stressed as is ethics, supervision issues, current research and clinical methods.This program is sponsored by both the National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) and the New Mexico Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors Association (NMADACA). Participation in the 30 hours “Annual WNMU Alcohol & Drug Institute’’ is required. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

CHDP 521. Dual Diagnosis. Will examine the DSM-IV-TR as a tool for the initial assessment process, psychiatric disorders, substances abuse disorders, and show how to diagnose co-occurring disorders. Treatment planning for dually diagnosed individuals. Prerequisite: CHDP 585 and permission of the instructor. (3)

CHDP 565 Pharmacology. Will examine the ways drugs affect the brain and behavior. The content will range from general principles of neurobiology and pharmacology to the actions of specific classes of drugs. The primary focus of the course will be neurobiological and behavioral effects of drugs. Prerequisite: CHDP 585 and permission of the instructor. (3)

CHDP 581. Internship in Chemical Dependency. A supervised field experience utilizing a variety of psychological counseling skills and applications in an appropriate counseling setting under the direction of a professional psychologist. Prerequisites: PSY 102 and permission of the instructor. (3-9, 12 hours maximum)

CHDP 585. Directed Study.

CHDP 587. Group Dynamics. Provides the basic knowledge of group process, practice, and techniques used in chemical dependency counseling; examines the stages of development of group process and the techniques used in each stage. Prerequisites: CHDP 403. (3)

Computer Science

CMPS 501. Introduction to Information Security. Concepts and principles of system and data security. Risks and vulnerabilities, policy formation, controls and protection methods, database security, encryption, authentication technologies, host-based and network-based security issues, personnel and physical security issues, issues of law and privacy. Discussions include firewall design and implementation, secure internet and intranet protocols, and techniques for responding to security breaches. Prerequisites: CMPS 505 or equivalent. (3)

CMPS 505. MIS for Managers. Concepts of MIS from a user’s perspective; explores the questions of: What is MIS? How do I use information as a manager? How do I use the MIS department to get the information I need in a form I can understand and use? This is a non-programming computer course. Prerequisites: BSAD 350, CMPS 110 or 111. (3)

CMPS 515. Advanced Concepts of Database. Databases are used by millions of users each day. However, competency in designing and creating databases has not increased with popularity. As databases provide core functionality for client-server applications for both business-to-business and business-to-consumer e-commerce applications, database design, development and administration are critical to information systems graduates, as well as, managerial personnel in today’s world of business technology. Prerequisites: CMPS 263. (3)

CMPS 525. Computer Forensics. Addresses the way organizations respond to computer crime incidents and discusses how to forensically examine and recover data from various operating systems and application system environments. Core forensic procedures for any operating or file system, and how to conduct forensically sound examinations to preserve evidence for admission and use in legal proceed

ings is addressed. Prerequisites: CMPS 111 or equivalent and CMPS 505 or equivalent. (3)

CMPS 535. e-Commerce. A ground up development of a web-based business will be undertaken. Tools and skills required for e-commerce will be developed and utilized. Online testing and practical experience are given essentials. Prerequisites: CMPS 263, CMPS 362, and CMPS 365. (3)

CMPS 540. Information Warfare. Overview of the working of Information Warfare in various settings, including, but not limited to, code (cipher) making and breaking, social engineering, hacking, denial of service, software nicking, nasty dealing, problem solving, web research and paper writing. This course is intended for upper-class Management Information Systems and Business majors and some other by instructor consent. No programming skills are required, although those who have certain skills may be given assignments to prepare and present to the class. Prerequisites: CMPS 505. (3)

CMPS 545. Cryptography: Algorithms & Applications. Introduction to the terms and concepts of Cryptography and the use of algorithms and applications in securing digital information. Prerequisite: CMPS 505. (3)

CMPS 567. Information Systems Networking. The essentials of networking will be covered from a management perspective. Practical examples and experience will be provided as course elements. Topologies and operations, monitoring and security issues will be studied in depth. Prerequisites: CMPS 505. (3)

Counseling

COUN/EDUC 500. Methods of Research. Acquaints the beginning graduate student with the nature and significance of research; enables the student to read, evaluate, and apply research results and techniques; gives some understanding of the meaning and spirit of research; gives some experience in studying and preparing research reports; required of all Master of Arts and Master of Arts in Teaching degree candidates. (3)

COUN 501. Introduction to the Profession of Counseling. This is an introductory counseling course covering some of the basic issues which will confront the beginning practitioner. Much time will be spent examining the ethical and legal concerns of the profession. An emphasis will be placed upon effective counselor characteristics, basic communication skills and counseling theories and techniques relevant to diverse population. (3)

COUN 505. Multicultural Counseling. This course is designed to assist students in understanding, valuing, and becoming effective in counseling diverse populations. It is based upon the promotion of cultural awareness and will assist students to identify their cultural assumptions in relation to people different from themselves. It will also enable students to identify and practice cross cultural counseling techniques. (3)

COUN 525. Child and Adolescent Development and Counseling. Introduces the student to the developmental stages of children and adolescents, to the challenges faced by children and adolescents as well as specific counseling intervention strategies for working with children and adolescents. It also focuses on the importance of the family and how the family must be included in the work of the mental health professional when addressing children and adolescent issues. (3)

COUN 531. Theories and Techniques of Counseling. An intensive course in counseling theories, techniques, and methods, stressing the procedures appropriate to different stages of the counseling process, the use of assessments, evaluation, and other materials in counseling, and counseling with a variety of individuals and problems. (3)

COUN 532. Program Development and Management. The course is devoted to the planning, development, organization and administration of counseling and other human service programs. It will include information and exercises in developing needs assessments, grant writing, fund raising, community organization, and other aspects of program development, as well as covering a broad range of program management responsibilities and techniques. The course will require participation and the development of related proposals and/or materials. It will provide for as much experiential based learning as possible. Students take COUN 532 or 555 depending on their area of interest. (3)

COUN 534. Life Themes and Stages. The student will be introduced to the developmental approach to counseling in both the school and community setting. Community resources will be explored in the context of a developmental counseling program. Developmental theory will be related to preventive strategies assigned to keep the child mentally healthy. It will also present appropriate interventions for those individuals whose normal developmental processes have been affected by adverse internal or external forces. (3)

COUN 536. Working with Drug Abusers. This course is concerned with the special knowledge and techniques for successfully working with drug abusers. (1)

COUN 546. Working with the Elderly. The course is concerned with the special knowledge and techniques for successfully working with elderly persons. (1)

COUN 548. Working with Abused Persons. The course is concerned with the special knowledge and techniques for successfully working with abused persons. (1)

COUN 555. School Counseling. This course introduces the student to the roles and responsibilities of a school counselor. The course provides an overview of the functions and skills critical to delivering a Comprehensive Competency Based Guidance program to all students in grades pre-K-12, based on the American School Counseling Association national standards. Students will take COUN 555 or COUN 532 depending on their area of specialization. Prerequisites: COUN 501, COUN 534 (3)

COUN 578. Topics in Counseling. A seminar type class in which a variety of currently relevant issues and topics will be explored. Research into areas of concern and interest will be shared and discussed. In addition to certain competency areas, other current topics may be examined. Course may be repeated for credit when topic is different. (3)

COUN 581. Internship in Counseling. In this entry level 150 clock hour field experience course, the student utilizes a variety of counseling skills and applications in an appropriate counseling setting under the direction of a professional counselor.

Prerequisites: COUN 501 plus 9 additional hours of counseling courses and advisor approval. (3)

COUN 582. Advanced Internship in Counseling. In this exit level 300 clock hour field experience course, the student utilizes a variety of counseling skills and applications in an appropriate counseling setting under the direction of a professional counselor.

For each three hours of Internship, 150 clock hours of experience is required. Only six hours are required for a Masters degree but the course may be repeated up to a total of 12 credits. Prerequisites: COUN 581 and advisor approval. (3-6).

COUN 586. Vocational Guidance/Career Development. A systematic study of career development theories and practices, as well as occupational information. The course focuses on counseling methods and strategies that are appropriate for working with clients in many settings. (3)

COUN 587. Seminar in Group Processes. This course will focus on current thought in group counseling theory and practice. Group techniques for use with clients in a broad spectrum of settings will be reviewed and demonstrated; students will have the opportunity to develop group leader skills by participating in a counseling group as both a leader and a group member. Prerequisites: COUN 501, COUN 531 or advisor approval. (3)

COUN 588. Psychopharmacology for Counselors and Therapists. Tools for understanding psychotropic medications in the mental health continuum. Topics covered will be brain anatomy, neurotransmission, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, students will be provided information on clinical syndromes and medications for depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders and psychotic disorders. Special consideration will be given to diagnosis and treatment implications for special populations such as children and adolescents, and geriatric clients. Prerequisite: PSY 512 and COUN 501. (3)

COUN 596. Marriage and Family Counseling. This course is designed to introduce students to a knowledge base which will include current theories, assessments, research, and ethical considerations relating to a systems approach of marriage and family counseling. Demonstrations and role playing of various techniques and strategies will be used for clarification and practice. Prerequisites: COUN 501, COUN 531 or advisor approval. (3)

Criminal Justice

CJUS 517. Frontier Law Enforcement. An examination of the law enforcement officer on the Western Frontier. The responsibilities, experiences, tactics, political environment, challenges and day-to-day life of the frontier sheriff with particular emphasis given to Arizona and New Mexico Territories. (3)

Economics

ECON 500. Economic Analysis. Microeconomics and Macroeconomics for graduate students with limited preparation in economics. Mircroeconomics topics include supply and demand, consumer theory, resource markets, production and costs and market structure. Macroeconomics topics include national income accounting, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy and international trade. Prerequisite: College Algebra or equivalent. (3)

ECON 512. Comparative Analysis Using Managerial Economics. Application of microeconomic theory to problems confronting managers and the business firm; estimation and forecasting for demand, cost, production; output and price determination and capital budgeting. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202. A required course. Fall only. (3)

ECON 580. Economics Workshop. Theory and practical application of a relevant economics topic. (1-3)

Education

EDUC/COUN 500. Methods of Research. This course will acquaint the beginning graduate student with the nature and significance of research; enables the student to read, evaluate, and apply research results and techniques; give some understanding of the meaning and spirit of research; give some experience in studying and preparing research reports. This course is required of all Master of Arts and Master of Arts in Teaching degree candidates. (3)

EDUC 503. Action Research. This course is designed to assist graduate students in education programs to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for beginning action researchers to engage in small-scale school based projects. The course includes theoretical and practical skills in developing proposals for action research projects. (1-3).

EDUC 505. Exploratory Field Experience - Elementary. Multi-level, multi-discipline field experience; includes a weekly seminar. Take after or concurrently with EDUC 506. (1-3)

EDUC 506. History and Philosophy of Education. A survey of the rise of educational practice as it has been interrelated with changes in social and educational philosophy, research, and cultural conditions in the United States. Take prior to or concurrently with EDUC 505 or 507 or 564. (3)

EDUC 507. Exploratory Field Experience - Secondary. Multi-level, multi-discipline field experience; includes a weekly seminar. Take concurrently with EDUC 506. (1-3)

EDUC 514. Elementary Instructional Planning & Assessment. Provides theory and practical aspects of instructional planning and assessment for elementary teachers. Prerequisites: admission to Teacher Education Program. (2)

EDUC 534. Integration of Technology into Curriculum. Focus on technology as a vehicle for creating culturally responsive student-centered learning environments. Areas of discussion will be content, skills and ways to use a variety of technology to supplement and enhance school curriculum. Prerequisite: EDUC 402 or other computer class as approved. (3)

EDUC 536. Classroom Management. Focuses on preparing prospective teachers to manage their classroom. Through instructor facilitation and group discussion, preventative and curative methods in classroom management will be taught, and utilized in the concurrent practice teaching experience (EDUC 592 or 594). Permission required. All core/professional courses must be taken prior to Classroom Management. Prerequisites: EDUC 506 and EDUC 570 or 571. (3)

EDUC 545. Professional Development - Intensive Writing. Designed to assist entering graduate students improve their analytical writing skills. The course helps under-prepared students master the skills necessary for writing intensive courses. (3)

EDUC 564. TEP Field Experience. Multi-level, multi-discipline field experience and seminar concerning the Teacher Education Program. Must be taken prior to or concurrently with EDUC 506. (1)

EDUC 570. Elementary Curriculum and Instruction. Examination and exploration of elementary curriculum to influence understanding and behavior. Provides practical experience in designing curricula to meet state mandates as well as community needs. Includes field experience and supervision. Prerequisite: EDUC 505 or 564, EDUC 506 and admission to Teacher Education Program. (6-8)

EDUC 571. Secondary Curriculum and Instruction. Exploration of the influence of curriculum on understanding and behavior. Examination of historical settings and significance of curricular design. Provides practical experience in designing curricula to meet community needs and state mandates. Includes 30 hours field experience in teaching fields. Prerequisites: EDUC 506, EDUC 507 or 564 and admission to Teacher Education Program. (3)

EDUC 572. Elementary Methods and Curriculum I. Focuses on examination of elementary school curriculum and methods for Social Studies, Language Arts, Fine Ars, and Career Readiness. Provides experience in designing curricula to meet NM Standards and Benchmarks and community needs. Includes 15 hours field experience. Prerequisites: EDUC 505 or 564, 506 and admission to Teacher Education Program. (3)

EDUC 573. Elementary Methods and Curriculum II. Focuses on examination of elementary school curriculum and methods for Mathematics, Science, Health, and PE. Provides experience in designing curricula to meet NM Standards and Benchmarks and community needs. Includes 15 hours field experience. Prerequisites: EDUC 572. (3)

EDUC 574. Classroom Assessment. Course focuses on preparing teachers to assess student classroom performance from a curriculum/instruction perspective, including informal evaluations, teacher-made tests, authentic and portfolio assessments, and nationally normed and standardized tests. Prerequisites: EDUC 506, EDUC 507 or 564 and admission to Teacher Education Program. (3)

EDUC 580. Education Workshop. Workshops are provided in current educational theory and practice for school personnel in the areas of elementary or secondary

education. (1-3)

EDUC 592. Practice Teaching - Elementary. This is a one semester course of supervised classroom experience as a practice teacher in a public elementary school and involves a full time assignment with licensed educational personnel supervision. Attendance of a seminar is also a course requirement. Seminars will emphasize teaching methods, ethics, multiculturalism, and tutoring coaching. Permission required. All Core Professional courses must be completed prior to registering for Practice Teaching. (1-6)

EDUC 594. Practice Teaching - Secondary. A one semester course of supervised classroom experience as a practice teacher in a public secondary school and involves a full time assignment with licensed educational personnel supervision. Attendance of a seminar is also a course requirement. Seminars will emphasize teaching methods, behavioral management, ethics, multiculturalism, and tutoring.

Permission required. All Core/Professional courses must be completed prior to registering for Practice Teaching. (1-6)

EDUC 598. Education Thesis. (6)

Educational Leadership

EDL 520 Curriculum, Instruction, and Program Leadership. Fundamentals of curriculum and program development for national/state accreditation, including criteria to guide decision making, using specific models and processes emphasizing action research in curriculum pedagogy, assessment, and technology. (3)

EDL 523 Professional Development and Assessment. An intensive process that focuses on the educational leader’s role in faculty professional development, collaboration, performance assessment, and coaching for improved student achievement. (3)

EDL 524 Characteristics of Effective Leadership. Emphasis is placed upon leadership across and among cultures. A thorough review of leadership styles, habits, personal attributes, and potential for professional leadership will be experienced. (3)

EDL 525 Education in a Pluralistic Society. A review of the educational perspectives, intent, practices, and issues in a multicultural society will be examined, including but not limited to, race, language, culture, ethnicity, gender, and special needs. (3)

EDL 526 Educational Leadership in the Public Domain. The evolution of education practices, organizations, governance, politics, and technology is examined. Emphasis is placed upon the inter-relationship of culture, governance, and community relations. Problems and issues in developing an effective educational environment, including conflict resolution and communication skills are addressed. (3)

EDL 530 Resource Management. Identifies the responsibilities of educational leaders in the management of financial, physical, and human resources that support educational objectives, including grant writing and funding proposals. (3)

EDL 545 Current Educational Trends and Issues. This course is designed for Educational Leadership candidates to pursue selected trends and issues in education via a seminar arrangement. Leadership candidates will have the opportunity to apply prior educational knowledge of content with “think tank” seminar experiences to reach solutions/alternatives to current and future issues in education. (3)

EDL 560 Legal Aspects of Education. Focus will be on the legal principles and practices relevant to education at the national, state, and district level. (3)

EDL 581 Beginning Internship in Educational Leadership. An initial field experience of at least 90 hours in an approved educational setting facilitating the synthesis of educational theory and practice, including, seminars, pre-assessment of leadership performance, goal statements, action plan, and development of the Master of Arts Comprehensive-Assessment Portfolio. Prerequisite: Internship candidates must have successfully completed at least six of the required EDL courses and the internship application process prior to enrolling. (3)

EDL 582 Advanced Internship in Educational Leadership. A culminating field experience of at least 90 hours in an approved educational setting facilitating the synthesis of educational theory and practice, including biweekly seminars. A collaborative, summative assessment by the EDL candidate, clinical faculty (on-site mentor), and the WNMU professor will be conducted, including successful completion of the Master of Arts Comprehensive-Assessment Portfolio. (3)

English

ENGL 504. Early English and European Literature. A historical survey of English and European literature from the Middle Ages through the early Renaissance. Emphasizes the significant cultural changes marking the transition from Medieval to Renaissance life, as well as the important differences between English and continental writers. Authors to be studied may include (but need not be limited to) Chaucer, Dante, Bocaccio, Marie de France, Marery Kemp and Julian of Norwich. (3)

ENGL 507. Modern Continental Literature. Studies, in translation, of recent literary works of continental writers which thematically and stylistically supplement and illuminate the work of modem British and American writers. (3)

ENGL 510. Advanced Creative Writing. Advanced practice in original composition with a focus on research and publication within a chosen genre; demands a sophisticated understanding of the English language, an application of critical thought, and a commitment to creativity. Prerequisite: ENGL 320. (3)

ENGL 511. The American Novel. Readings in American fiction from 1945 to the present. (3)

ENGL 515. Life and Literature of New Mexico. A study of the fiction, travels, memoirs, and folklore of New Mexico with emphasis on those writings which reflect the cultural heritage and the literary accomplishments of the area. (3)

ENGL 518. Studies in English Literature. Advanced study in a particular period, author, theme, or genre in English literature; serves as an in-depth follow-up to the most recently offered English literature survey course. (3)

ENGL 519. Advanced Composition. Intensive work in expository writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 520. Studies in American Literature. Selected studies in periods, genres, and figures in American literature; appropriate areas of study selected by teachers and students. (3)

ENGL 521. The British Novel. Studies in the history and development of the British novel; an analysis and interpretation of the socio-economic conditions which it reflects. (3)

ENGL 530. Contemporary British Literature. Readings in British literature from 1945 to the present. (3)

ENGL 538. Women as Writers. Examination of selected writings by English and American women from the sixteenth to twentieth centuries, with special consideration given to the ways in which women portray women’s experience, image, self-concepts and role in society. (3)

ENGL 540. Shakespeare. Study of the major plays, including representative tragedies, comedies, and histories, with emphasis on language and theme. (3)

ENGL 542.The Enlightenment. Acquaints the student with the significant changes in ideas and values which swept Europe and the Americas in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 550. Secondary English Methods. Techniques and texts appropriate to the high school classroom. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. Offered every third semester. (3) ENGL 551. Literature of the American West. A survey of the literature of the west with emphasis upon historical narratives, folk literature, nature writing, and fiction. (3)

ENGL 565. Critical Approaches to Literature. An intensive study of literatures through the application of various insights and knowledge from other fields that can reveal more about the literatures as well as more about the students exploring the literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 and ENGL 201. (3)

ENGL 570. Feminist Theories of Literature. Highlights women’s issues and women’s literature, and investigates theoretical approaches to all literature, building on students’ understanding of the literary canon, women’s social and historical issues, and literary theory, with emphasis on extensive research and writing. (3).

ENGL 598. English Thesis. (6)

Geology

GEOL 550. Inquiry Teaching Methods in Science. Inquiry methods in science education including theory and rationale. Development and implementation of inquiry activities and assessment of activities. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

GEOL 580/480. Geology Workshop for Teachers. A workshop designed to increase understanding of and familiarity with geological materials, pheonomena, theories, and techniques of interpretation through a combination of lectures, slides, hands-on exercises, and field trips. (3-4)

History

HIST 500. Colonial American History. History of Colonial North America. (3)

HIST 505. Seminar in Modern European History. History of a recognized period of European history falling between 1789 and the present, following regular seminar techniques. (3)

HIST 507. History and Historians. A study of historical writing from ancient times to the present with reading in depth in the works of specific historians. (3)

HIST 509. Seminar in Local History. Provides research opportunities and writing experience in studying topics of local history. (3)

HIST 510. Cultural Perspectives of the Far East. Concerned with the music, art, architecture, literature, history, and religion of many Far Eastern countries; major emphasis on China and Japan, but also includes India, the Philippines, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Malaysia. (3)

HIST 514. History of the Southwest. Westward expansion and frontier movements in the Southwest under Spain, Mexico, and the United States. (3)

HIST 521. The Contemporary North American Indian. Some of the major problems confronting the American Indian today, including significant historical, anthropological, and sociological issues leading up to them; exploration and discussion of possible solutions to these problems; includes a study of acculturation and the present status of North American Indian society. (3)

HIST 522. Indians of the Southwest. An analysis and comparison of aboriginal cultures of the southwest region of North America, including coastal tribes; emphasis on New Mexico. (3)

HIST 535. The Civil War and Reconstruction. The Civil War and Reconstruction era are analyzed in depth, considering the political, military, economic, and social currents. (3)

HIST 541. Ancient Civilizations. A study of the civilizations of the ancient Near East and Mediterranean area from the earliest beginnings in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Anatolia, and Crete through Greece and the Roman Empire. (3)

HIST 542. Medieval Civilizations. A study of the civilizations of the Mediterranean and Western Europe from the decline of Rome to A.D. 1500. (3)

HIST 543. Early Modern Europe. An examination of the history of Europe from the Renaissance to the Enlightment, concentrating on the political, social, religious, and intellectual developments of the period. (3)

HIST 556. Social/Intellectual History to 1865. The history and influence of such institutions and issues as religion, slavery, immigration, and war and peace with reference to appropriate literature. (3)

HIST 557. Social/Intellectual History since 1865. The history and influence of such institutions and issues as ``Reconstruction,’’ Industrialism, and The ``New Immigration’’; the impact of World War I and World War II on current thought; the impact of labor and the military industrial complex; references to appropriate literature. Prerequisite: HIST 201, HIST 202, or Permission of the Instructor. (3)

HIST 576. World War II. A study of the origins, course, and consequences of the Second World War, both in European and Pacific theaters of operations. The course will examine the social, political, economic, and technological aspects of the war as well as the military. (3)

HIST 595. Tutorial Reading in History. Examines and analyzes a given area of history by the reading of selected books on the period or topic, and regular consultations with a professor. (1-3)

HIST 598. History Thesis. (6)

Mathematics

MATH 502, 503, 504. Computer Literacy for in-service Teachers. Introduction to the use of computer hardware and software for computer use in the classroom, computer assisted instruction, and computer maintained instruction. (1 each)

MATH 505. Desktop Publishing. An introduction to desktop publishing using a hands-on approach. Topics of interest include integration of text, graphics, and page layouts using PageMaker software. Course assignments will include projects such as posters, curriculum vitae, and newsletters. (3)

MATH 508. Mathematics and Computers for Teachers. A course to update in-service teachers in modern algorithms with the computer; also, the mathematics and use of the computer on various statistical problems encountered by teachers. (3)

MATH 510, 511, 512. Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher I, II, III. These courses serve to update the elementary teacher in mathematics. Such topics as logic, sets, number systems and their properties, and geometry are considered as they pertain to elementary school mathematics. (3 each)

MATH 515, 516, 517. Mathematics for the Secondary Teacher I, II, III. These courses serve to update and broaden the math backgrounds of secondary teachers of mathematics. Topics considered are modern algebra, number theory, set theory, geometry, and a study of functions. (3 each)

MATH 580. Mathematics Workshop. Theory and practical application of a relevant mathematics topic. (1-3)

Movement Sciences

MVSC 506. Advanced Psychology of Movement Sciences. Information on the brain and central nervous system to provide a background for better understanding and application of psychological principles as they relate to physical education and sport; includes personality, arousal, attribution, motivation, stress, cognitive styles, and aggression. (3)

MVSC 515. Legal Aspects of Movement Sciences and Athletics. A study of the role of the teacher and the school in responsibility for accidents and injuries; emphasis upon student and teacher rights and responsibilities, and the administrative and organization principles which contribute to the reduction of teacher liability. (3)

MVSC 520. Selected Topics in Exercise Science. Designed to explore current developments in exercise science as applied to the performance and training of athletes and the general population. Includes topics primarily in biomechanics, anatomical kinesiology and exercise physiology. (3)

MVSC 522. Mechanical Aspects of Motor Skills. Muscular and biomechanical analysis of motor activities to determine their relationship to the laws of physics concerning motion, force, levers, and stability. (3)

MVSC 532. The Movement Sciences Curriculum. A study of the relationship of curriculum and American culture, with special emphasis placed on the role of movement sciences; principles, problems, and procedures in the development of a movement sciences curriculum. (3)

MVSC 533. Philosophy of Movement Sciences. A study of four philosophic disciplines and their influence on contemporary physical education; includes differences between and among Pragmatism, Idealism, Realism, and Existentialism to be interpreted as they help form objectives, the program, evaluation, values and concepts of the learner. (3)

MVSC 538. Supervision in Movement Sciences. Principles and practices for the supervision of activities and programs in elementary and secondary schools. (3)

MVSC 540. Problems in Movement Sciences. A study of current problems in physical education as reflected from critical study and analysis of contemporary professional literature. (3)

MVSC 545. Advanced Sport Sociology. An in-depth study of the topic of sport and its cultural context. Emphasis is on application of theory to situations encountered during field study. (3)

MVSC 550. Laboratory Assessment of Human Work Capacity. Instruction and practice in the use of modern laboratory equipment, techniques, and tests for the evaluation of human work capacity. (3)

Music

MUSC 500. Applied Music. One credit hour is given for one twenty-five minute private lesson per week and two credit hours are given for fifty minute lessons. Two credit hours requires concurrent registration and participation in the Applied Music Laboratory and in a major ensemble. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1-2).

MUSC 500A Applied Music - Piano 1-2 MUSC 500B Applied Music - Piano 1-2 MUSC 500C Applied Music - Organ 1-2 MUSC 500D Applied Music - Flute 1-2 MUSC 500E Applied Music - Woodwinds 1-2 MUSC 500F Applied Music - High Brass 1-2 MUSC 500G Applied Music - Low Brass 1-2 MUSC 500I Applied Music - High Strings 1-2 MUSC 500J Applied Music - Low Strings 1-2 MUSC 500K Applied Music - Guitar 1-2 MUSC 500L Applied Music - Voice 1-2 MUSC 500M Applied Music - Voice 1-2 MUSC 500N Applied Music - Voice 1-2 MUSC 500O Applied Music - Composition 2 MUSC 500P Applied Music - Percussion 1-2

MUSC 502. Applied Music Laboratory. Performance in a workshop format providing guidance and support as the students gain valuable experience. (0).

MUSC 521. Counterpoint I. (3)

MUSC 522. Counterpoint II. (3)

MUSC 580 Music Workshop. Treatment of current theory and practice in programs related to the music and music education disciplines. (1-3)

MUSC 591. Advanced Harmony I. (3)

MUSC 592. Advanced Harmony II. (3)

Psychology

PSY 501. Comparative Multicultural Social Studies. Hands-on experience with Mexican, Mexican-American, American Indian and rural Anglo cultures. Particular focus is placed on human and social services, education, and agency approaches toward mental and physical health as well as legal issues. The academic perspective involves social psychology, clinical, counseling, and educational frameworks. Individual, group, and inter-group interactions are explored. An intense week-long exploration of selected cultures is offered. Interaction with college students from other areas in the U.S. is part of the experience. Prerequisites: SOC 101 for

Sociology Majors, PSY 101 for Psychology Majors; and permission of the instructor. (3)

PSY 505. Psychology of Learning. Principles of learning theory directly applicable to effective teaching and counseling; considers the worth of learning theories of the recent past and relates them to good teaching and counseling methods; provides a framework in which the student may apply theories of learning. Prerequisite: PSY 102. (3)

PSY/SOC 506. Social Psychology. Introduction to social psychology from a symbolic interaction perspective. The course focuses on how humans make sense of and interpret their social world and react to the symbolic meanings attached to social life. Topics include: the self, identity, social construction of reality, human use of symbols, cognitive and social structure, ambiguity and conflict in social interaction. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

PSY 512. Psychopathology. A course based upon DMS-IV-R with a focus on the major categories of psychological pathology. Focus will be placed on the characteristics and requirements, as prescribed by N.M. statutes, relevant to the seriously emotionally, behaviorally disturbed child and youth. Assessments, evaluations, diagnoses, and treatment strategies will be discussed in detail. (3)

PSY 520. Diagnostics and Evaluation. Relationship of assessment/evaluation to making responsible; scientific diagnosis and subsequently developing corresponding treatment plans are is stressed in this course. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual clinical syndromes are explored as are measures used in assessment and evaluations. Statistics relevant to test assessments, reliability, and validity will be examined. Supervised administration of basic diagnostic measures within the schools and testing ethics will be part of this course. (3)

PSY 521. Advanced Clinical Seminar. An advanced level graduate or postgraduate course addressing the following clinical issues: comprehensive childhood and youth assessments; psychopharmacology; clinical neuropsychology; forensic psychology; and significant CLINICAL syndromes including multiple diagnosis. Student will also be exposed to relevant test procedures, assessments, evaluations, diagnosis, and report writing. Supervised field experiences in the schools is required. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

PSY 523. Child Clinical Psychology. Acquaints the graduate student with the neurophysiology and behavioral components of development from conception up until late adolescence and the completion of neurodevelopment. The mix of genetics and socialization relevant to normal and abnormal (characterologic and clinical) behaviors is explored, as well as, a host of assessments and treatment modalities, including behavioral interventions, significant other training, and psychopharmacology. Critical contemporary school/family/community youth issues will be addressed --- including: child abuse and neglect, delinquent and gang behaviors, substance use/abuse, youth pregnancies, youth violence (suicide and homicide) --- and how these factors relate to the child and adolescent social and neurophysiological development. Permission of the Instructor. (3)

PSY 525.Theories of Personality. Presents the major theories of personality from Freud to more contemporary figures. Personality assessment is stressed as well as the relationship of these measures to other areas of psychology including industrial/organizational psychology, employment assistance programs, marriage and the family, and clinical/counseling/school psychology. School assessments are part of the course requirements. (3)

PSY 526. Introduction to School Psychology. A survey course on the role of the school psychologist including a discussion of the licensure and certification process and exposure to the diversity of social, clinical, legal and ethnic issues facing the school psychologist.The course will also cover: (a) history and foundations of current issues in school psychology, (b) APA and NASP ethics, (c) the consultant role, and

(d) parent/community/school interaction. Permission of the instructor. (3)

PSY 530. Psychology of Gender. Review of research findings on sex differences between males and females. These findings will be used in discussions and student activities concerning areas where differences between males and females are found. (3)

PSY 535. Human Motivation. Examination of different biological, social, learning, and cognitive approaches to the topic of motivation. The key theories of motivation will be reviewed and applied. Contemporary issues will be analyzed from a motivational perspective. (3)

PSY 580. Psychology Workshop. Current theory and practice in programs related to the general discipline. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3-9)

PSY 581. School Psychology Internship I. Two semesters of 1200 contract hours of (600 each semester) full time experience with a school psychologist in an approved elementary, middle or high school setting. Students will be provided the opportunity to test, assess, evaluate, diagnose and treat children and youth with supervision. Parent/school inter-action and communication is also stressed. Weekly seminars will address critical school psychology topics throughout the internship. The desired result is a suitable and capable science practitioner. Prerequisites: completion of all course work and passage of the NASP (NCSP) exam at the required state cutting score. Offered only under special circumstances. (1 to 12 hours per semester)

PSY 582. Advanced Internship in Psychology. A supervised field experience utilizing a variety of psychological counseling skills and applications in an appropriate counseling setting under the direction of a professional psychologist. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3-12, 12 hours maximum)

PSY 598. Psychology Thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (6)

Reading Education

RDG 510.Teaching of Reading. This course provides an exploration of specialized techniques and materials for the teaching of reading in the elementary school and provides an overview of the nature of the developmental reading process; has a field experience. Prerequisites: EDUC 505 or 564 and EDUC 506 and Admission to Teacher Education Program. Permission Required. (3)

RDG 511. Corrective Reading Instruction. This course will provide diagnostic and instructional techniques for teaching children with reading problems in the regular classroom; course requires field experience and development of a case study. Prerequisite: RDG 510 with a grade of “C” or higher. Permission Required. (3)

RDG/SPED 512. Diagnosis and Prescription of Reading for Diverse Learners.

The course identifies theoretical and practical aspects of using formal and informal diagnostic procedures; selecting appropriate test batteries, prescribing instructional materials, and using appropriate teaching techniques. Permission Required. (3)

RDG 514. Theoretical Models of Reading. Theories of language acquisition, reading models, research, and current instructional issues related to theoretical models of reading will be examined. Permission Required. Summer only. (3)

RDG 515. Remedial Reading. This course is for advanced students in reading and investigates diagnosis of reading problems and their causes and remediation. The course includes actual work in diagnosis, prescription, and instruction of public school students experiencing reading problems and includes field experience. Permission Required. Spring (even numbered years). (3)

RDG 517. Early Childhood Reading. Course will focus on reading readiness, emergent literacy and early reading development research and instructional practices relating to nursery school, kindergarten, and the primary school; course includes field experience. Permission Required. Spring (odd numbered years). (3)

RDG 537. Literacy:Teaching Applications. The course will utilize a multi-disciplinary approach of theoretical nature with application of information during field experience Academic counterpart will explore the economical, the political, the sociological, and the moral issues facing society; includes 60 hours field experience. (3)

RDG 560. Reading Skills in Secondary Education. The course is designed to help secondary pre-teachers gain insight into the reading process in various content areas generally offered in the public secondary school; course includes investigation of methods and procedures for assisting students in the improvement of reading and study skills in the content areas and has a required field experience.

Prerequisites: EDUC 506 or 564, and EDUC 507 and Admission to Teacher Education Program. Permission Required. (3)

RDG 579. Seminar in Reading. This changing topical seminar will address current research and movements in reading education and includes discussion of issues determined by topics reflected in recent field related publications. Permission Required. (3)

RDG 581. Practicum in Reading. This capstone course is a supervised field experience that provides practice, demonstration, self-evaluation, and validation of competencies gained in the reading program. Permission required. (3)

Sociology

SOC/PSY 506. Social Psychology. Introduction to social psychology from a symbolic interaction perspective. The course focuses on how humans make sense of and interpret their social world and react to the symbolic meanings attached to social life. Topics include: the self, identity, social construction of reality, human use of symbols, cognitive and social structure, ambiguity and conflict in social interaction. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 550. Environmental Sociology. This course investigates the societal causes and cures of environmental deterioration. We will examine population, water, pollution, toxic racism, global climate change, energy, politics, globalization, environmental movements, and sustainable development. Students in this course are asked to think critically about societal impact on the environment and social inequality and the environment. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 560. Social Movements/Social Change. This course examines social movements and social change form a theoretical perspective. The goal is to understand the process of social movement emergence, development and outcomes. We will ask such questions as why movements emerge, who joins or supports movements, how are movements organized, what tactics do movements use, and what do movements accomplish. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 570. Sociology of Religion. This course is designed as an introduction to the sociological study of religion. We will ask questions such as: How has religion influenced society? Politics? Economics? Gender inequality? How has society influenced religion? Why do people participate in religion? The course includes both classic readings in the sociology of religion and contemporary work done in the field. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

Special Education

SPED 508. Introduction to Exceptional Children. An introduction to the various exceptionalities, procedures and processes of identifying and placing children with special needs into special remedial or accelerated programs, and of staffing those programs; emphasizes New Mexico programs, standards and guidelines, as well as issues presented in IDEA and other state and federal mandates. (3)

SPED/RDG 512. Diagnosis and Description of Reading for Diverse Learners.

The course identifies theoretical and practical aspects of using formal and informal diagnostic procedures; selecting appropriate test batteries, prescribing instructional materials, and using appropriate teaching techniques based upon individual diagnosis will be emphasized. Permission Required. (3)

SPED 528. Curriculum and Methods in Special Education. Provides teachers of students with disabilities with basic background in methods, materials, IEP and curriculum development; emphasizes the analysis and selection of curricula, instructional methods, and the use of materials in the educational process for children with disabilities. Thirty (30) hours of field work are required during this course. Prerequisites SPED 508, EDUC 506, 505 or 507 or 564 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. (3)

SPED 541. Practice Teaching - Special Education. One semester of supervised classroom experience as a practice teacher in a public school; involves a full-time assignment of one academic semester with licensed educational personnel supervision. Attendance of a weekly method seminar is also a course requirement. Seminars will emphasize teaching methods, behavioral management, ethics, multiculturalism, and tutoring/coaching. Permission Required. All core/professional courses must be completed prior to registering for practice teaching; including EDUC 536 which can be taken concurrently with SPED 551. (1-6)

SPED 551. Behavioral Management Approaches with Exceptional Children.

Emphasizes the use of behavior management strategies for children with special needs. Prerequisites: SPED 508, 528. Currently with SPED 541. Fall, alternate Summers. (3)

SPED 552. Families, School, Community Relations and the Exceptional Child. Prepares special education teachers to work effectively with the parents of children with special needs by providing information on a variety of issues dealing with parent-teacher relationships. Some of the issues are: value clarification, conferencing skills, assertiveness training, problem solving, establishing open communications, working with community agencies, discipline and legality. Spring, alternate Summers. (3)

SPED 554. Evaluation and Assessment of Exceptional Children. Familiarize special education teachers with the field of assessment, including methods, diagnostic instruments, and techniques for evaluating exceptional children.Prerequisites: SPED 508, 528. (3)

SPED 556. Culturally Diverse Exceptional Children. Theory and practice in bilingual/multicultural special education, with emphasis on language and culture, assessment practices, and learning styles of exceptional bilingual children. Fall, alternate Summers. (3)

SPED 569. Nature and Needs of Persons with Mental Retardation. Course is designed to assist teachers in understanding the nature of mental retardation from an interdisciplinary perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the educational significance of different theoretical perspectives as they relate to the needs of the intellectually disabled. (3)

SPED 570. Nature and Needs of Persons with Learning Disabilities. This course provides teachers with information which will assist them to understand the nature of learning disabilities from an interdisciplinary perspective. The focus will be on the identification, characteristics, and education of children with learning disabilities. Fall, alternate Summers. (3)

SPED 576. Nature and Needs of Persons with Emotional & Behavioral Disorders. This course provides teachers with information which will assist them to understand the nature of behavior disorders from an interdisciplinary perspective. The focus will be on the identification, characteristics, education and needs of children identified as emotionally disturbed. Spring, alternate Summers. (3)

SPED 581. Practicum in Special Education. This field experience consists of 180 clock-hours of supervised work with handicapped populations in public schools, residential facilities or clinical settings. Research activities may also be allowed as part of the course requirements. Students must meet all prerequisites before applying for this field work. This course is designed primarily for graduate students or students who have completed student-teaching field experience and are seeking advanced skill in working with handicapped persons. Prerequisites: SPED 508, 551, 528 and 554. Permission Required. (3)