Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Western New Mexico University does not offer all the classes listed in this catalog every semester or every year.

The following pages provide brief descriptions of course offerings. Course listings are subject to change. Each semester the university publishes a schedule of classes which provides a detailed listing of courses offered and the times and places of instruction. Courses listed in the

schedule of classes are subject to change.

EXPLANATORY NOTES

Numbering of Courses:

Course numbering is based on the content level of material presented in courses. Courses numbered: 100-299 . . . primarily for freshmen and sophomores. 175 & 275. . transfer General Education 300-499 . . . primarily for juniors and seniors.

500-599 . . . primarily for students enrolled in master’s degree programs or the equivalent. Undergraduate students may enroll if they have submitted and received approval on a Petition for Undergraduate Student to Register for Graduate Course form.

444/544,545 Courses are for professional development only, not degree credit.

Variable credit courses:

(1-3) indicates variable credit, the minimum and maximum credit limitations per semester are shown. An example:

MATH 580.Workshop in Mathematics. Theory and practical application of a relevant mathematics topic. (1-3)

Cross-listed courses:

Courses in which students may earn credit under either of two disciplines (e.g., SOC or HIST) for the same offering. Credit is only given once for each cross-listed course.

Corequisite:

A requirement which must be taken concurrently with another course.

Prerequisite:

A requirement which must be fulfilled before a student can enroll in a particular course. Permission of the instructor for a student to attend a class is implied when the student has met the prerequisites specified by the department. A student who has not fulfilled any prerequisites for a course may be dropped by the instructor of the course.

Cancellation of courses:

The university reserves the right to cancel courses that do not meet enrollment minimums or are not suitably staffed by qualified faculty.

KEYS TO SYMBOLS

Course descriptions include a variety of (symbols conveying essential information. The following standard course description with explanation of symbols serves as a model:

BSAD 333. Cost Accounting. The costs of production processing and construction of manufactured goods; designed to show how accounting can serve as a means of control. Prerequisites: BSAD 230 and 231. Fall only. (3)

BSAD . . . . . . . . . . .department name

333 . . . . . . . . . . . .course number Cost Accounting. . .course title “The costs of...’’. . . .explanation of course

content Prerequisite: BSAD 230 . .required to be taken before a student can enroll in a particular course Fall only . . . . . . . . .taught Fall semester

(3). . . . . . . . . . . . . .number of credits

Note: not all of the above information may be noted in each course.

Academic Studies and Honors Curriculum

ACAD 101. Student Success Seminar. A seminar for students who are new to WNMU. The course will familiarize the student with the university environment and will emphasize the development of critical thinking skills, the enhancement of study skills, and exploration of professional and career goals. (3)

ACAD 101H. Honors Freshman Seminar. A seminar for students entering the Honors Program. The course will emphasize the development of critical thinking skills, the enhancement of study skills, and encourage professional and career development. (1)

ACAD 198H. Honors Seminar. A lower division seminar for students enrolled in the Honors Program. The course will emphasize the continued development of critical thinking, enhancement of study skills, and encourage participation in campus activities. This course may be taken for credit up to four times. (1)

ACAD 398H. Honors Colloquium. An upper division seminar for students enrolled in the Honors Program. The course will emphasize integration of fields of study and enhancement of critical thinking skills. The course will encourage participation in campus activities. This course may be taken for credit up to four times. (1)

Anthropology

ANTH 201. Cultural Anthropology. Introduction to cultural anthropology including cross-cultural study of kinship, political, and economic systems. (NMCCN ANTH 2113)(Area IV). Writing Intensive. (3)

ANTH 202. Physical Anthropology & Archaeology. An introduction to the evolution of humans and their past cultures as well as how archaeologists and physical anthropologists approach the science of anthropology. (NMCCN ANTH 2213)(Area IV). (3)

Applied Technology

APLT 101. Manufacturing Processes. Introductory course in the process of manufacturing dealing with welding, machinery, foundry, casting, turing, and sheet metal. Analysis of plastic forming and molding with additional knowledge in tool and die making. Includes forming, joining and chip making tool processes projects. (4)

APLT 144. Professional Development in Technology I. Preparation of entry-level computer users to work in an applications setting. Designed to prepare students for direct entry into the work environment. This course is not part of WNMU’s approved programs, but may be used in an academic degree with prior approval from the academic advisor, and appropriate department chair. (1-3)

APLT 150. Business Practices. Subject matter shall include: personal development, goal setting, work ethics and principles, problem solving, communications, time management, customer service, safety in the work place, sexual harassment, dating in the work place, racial harassment, violence, resume and interviewing skills. (2)

APLT 244. Professional Development in Technology II. Advanced professional development for computer users who will work in an applications setting to support the information processing function. (1-3)

Art

ART 101. 2-D Design. The study of formal relationships focusing on two dimensional design. Fall only. (4)

ART 102. Color. Theory and application of color. Spring only (4)

ART 103. 3-D Design. Spatial dimension via planes, simple and compound curved surfaces, structure, straight and curved lines, geometric and organic masses. Spring only. (4)

ART 107. Drawing I. A full range of subject matter and media used by the student to develop basic technical skill and to increase visual awareness. (4)

ART 114. Graphic Design Software I. Introduction to computer basics software elements and applications using graphic design programs such as Painter and Photoshop. Prerequisite: for art majors and minors. Fall and Spring. (4)

ART 115. Electronic Imaging for Design. Focuses on creative approaches to working with electronic tools such as computers, scanners, printers and copy machines. Experimentation is the main emphasis on image manipulation, web page design and animation. Prerequisite: ART 101. Fall only. (4)

ART 205. Non-toxic Printmaking I. A basic survey of new non-toxic printmaking techniques. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 107. Fall only. (4)

ART 207. Drawing II. A continuation of the development of technical skills, and the perceptual objectives in drawing. Prerequisite: ART 107. Spring only. (4)

ART 210. Photography I. Introduction to basic photographic processes (exposure, development and printing), the camera and learning to see. Field trips will be included. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 101. (4)

ART 211. Art Appreciation. A survey of the meaning and methods of art: films, slides, exhibits, lectures, discussion, and some studio experiences are included. Fall, Spring, Summer. (NMCCN ARTS 1113)(Area V). (3)

ART 214. Graphic Design Software II. Further development of basic software for graphic design. Prerequisite: ART 114. Fall and Spring. (4)

ART 215. Design Portfolio Development. Students professionally present their artwork and artistic philosophy to the art community through an organized portfolio presentation consisting of slides, slide list, artistic statement and resume, and a record of learning. Fall only. (2)

ART 216. Business and Legal Issues for Artists. Principles of copyright and contract law as it applies to artists. The course will introduce the structure and operating principles for an arts related business. Required for graphic design majors. Prerequisite: BSAD 100 or 152 . Spring only. (3)

ART 221. Beginning Fibers I. Introduction to fiber arts techniques focusing on hand constructed forms and simple loom (inkle, frame) techniques. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 101. (4)

ART 230. Papermaking I. A survey of the history, theory, process and studio application of hand papermaking. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 101. Spring only. (4)

ART 241. Clay I. Introduction to clay as an art medium: hand building, decorating techniques, glazing and firing processes. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 103. (4)

ART 251. Painting I. Basic survey of contemporary and traditional painting techniques with a variety of media. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 101, 102, 107. (4)

ART 261. Sculpture I. Introduction to contemporary and traditional methods and aesthetics of sculpture. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 103 and ART 107. Fall only. (4).

ART 271. Web Design and Typography. Fundamentals of page and web design and typography. Projects will reflect the potential of Adobe's Creative Suite and application of page layout in creating effective, original and professional print design applications. Prerequisites: ART 101, 102, 114, 214. Spring only. (4)

ART 272. Graphic Design Studio. Individually tailored graphic design projects focusing on the synthesis of advanced techniques - design, development and presentation. Prerequisites: ART 115, 214, 215, 271. Spring only. (4)

ART 281. Internship in Art. The students first select an appropriate field for internship from the art community/industry. Students must negotiate a written contract and complete 90 hours in the field. This course may be repeated two times. Prerequisite: ART 271. Fall and Spring. (1-2)

ART 301. Life Drawing. Study of the human form in a variety of drawing media to develop technical, perceptual and aesthetic understandings. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 107. Spring only. (4)

ART 303. Electronic Art Imaging. This course focuses on creative approaches to working with electronic tools such as computers, scanners, printers and copy machines. Experimentation is the main emphasis as students explore image manipulation, web page design, and animation. Prerequisite: ART 101. Fall only. (4)

ART 306. Non-Toxic Printmaking II. Refined exploration into various new nontoxic printmaking techniques. Prerequisite: ART 205, or permission of the instructor. Fall only. (4)

ART 310. Photography II. A continuation of photography I refining technical skills (exposure, film development, and print development) with an emphasis on creating the “good print.” Prerequisite: ART 210. (4)

ART 321. Intermediate Fibers I. Floor and table weaving using loom and weaver controlled weaves. Prerequisite for art majors and minors: ART 101. (4)

ART 322. Intermediate Fibers II. Double weave, tubular weaving, applied three dimensional and other off loom techniques. Prerequisite: ART 221. (4)

ART 330. Papermaking II. Advanced skills in papermaking, basic skills in book-arts and letterpress. Prerequisite: ART 230. Spring only. (4)

ART 342. Clay II. Introductory study of wheel throwing, making of glazes and advanced decorating techniques. Prerequisite: ART 241 (4)

ART 352. Painting II. Further development of contemporary and traditional painting techniques using a variety of media. Prerequisite: ART 251. (4)

ART 362. Sculpture II. Development of aesthetics and skills in a selected medium of sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 261. (4)

ART 371. Computer Graphic Web Design. Advanced type and web design concepts, half-tone and line art preparation; production techniques using computers, scanners, advanced graphics and page layout software. Prerequisite: ART 271. Spring only. (4)

ART 378, 386, 387, 388, 389, History of World Art. ART 378: Women in Art; ART 386: Pre-Renaissance; ART 387: Renaissance and Baroque; ART 388: Contemporary Art; ART 389: Mexican Art. (3 each) One art history course is offered each semester on a two and a half year rotation.

ART 395. Tutorial Reading. (1-3)

ART 401. Mata Ortiz Study Trip. Travel to Juan Mata Ortiz and Viejo Casas Grandes, Mexico, for three days and two nights to visit potters, take part in a handson-workshop featuring the process which made the village and its potters world famous and visit the Paquime museum. (1-2)

ART 405. Non-toxic Printmaking III. Intensive approach to the non-toxic planographic and intaglio craft. Prerequisite: ART 306. (4)

ART 406. Non-toxic Printmaking IV. Advanced techniques with emphasis on experimental non-toxic printmaking processes. Prerequisite: ART 405 or permission of the instructor. (4).

ART 410. Photography III. Enhancing the negative and print controls leading to stronger images and presentations. Darkroom demonstrations and field trips. Prerequisite: ART 310. (4)

ART 411. Photography IV. Advanced darkroom and image development. Prerequisite: ART 410 or permission of the instructor. (4)

ART 421. Fiber Arts III. Advanced fiber exploration including in-depth research of area chosen by student with faculty guidance. Focus: two-dimensional or three-dimensional work. Prerequisite: ART 321 or ART 322. (4)

ART 425. Elementary Art Methods. Seeks an understanding of the art process, and the growth and development of children through art; includes teaching methods, philosophies, and media practiced on the elementary level. (3)

ART 430. Papermaking III. Continued advanced techniques in papermaking and bookart. Prerequisite: ART 330. Spring only. (4)

ART 431. Papermaking IV. Advanced techniques with an emphasis on the experimental. Prerequisite: ART 430. Spring only. (4)

ART 441. Clay III. Functional ceramics, production techniques, glaze formation and firing processes. Prerequisite: ART 342. (4)

ART 442. Clay IV. Continued advanced skill development of the wheel and sculptural applications. Prerequisite: ART 441. (4)

ART 450. Secondary Art Methods. Develops philosophical, psychological, theoretical and practical concepts in art education with an emphasis on form, media, and curriculum development for grades 7-12. Alternate Falls/odd numbered years. (3)

ART 451. Painting III. Advanced techniques. Prerequisite: ART 352. (4)

ART 452. Painting IV. Special experimental techniques. Prerequisite: ART 451 or permission of the instructor. (4)

ART 461. Sculpture III. Special techniques in sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 362. (4)

ART 462. Sculpture IV. Advanced special techniques in sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 461 or permission of the instructor. (4)

ART 471. Advanced Web Design. Web design and web site development or anyone who needs or wants to master the technical aspects of Adobe's Creative Suite. Prerequisite: ART 371. Spring only. (4)

ART 475. Art History Visual Thesis. Advanced research in Art History, relating research to their own artwork. Students will culminate his/her research with a public visual lecture of their findings. Prerequisite: BFA students with 12 cr. Art History. Spring only. (1)

ART 476. Portfolio. Prepares BFA students to professionally present their artwork and artistic philosophy to the art community through an organized portfolio presentation consisting of slides, slide list, artist statement, and resume. Prerequisite: two upper division studio Art courses. Fall only. (2)

ART 477. Seminar. This lecture/discussion course will unite BFA students from different areas of art specialization into a forum. Focus on pertinent issues in art through discussion, research and presentations. This course may be repeated three times. Prerequisite: two upper division studio Art courses. Spring only. (1)

ART 478, 479, 482, 483, 484, 486, 487, 488, 489. Studio Work. ART 478 Graphic Design, ART 479: Clay; ART 482: Fiber Arts; ART 483: Painting; ART 484: Printmaking; ART 486: Drawing; ART 487: Sculpture; ART 488: Photography; ART

489: Papermaking. These courses may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Limited to advanced students. Prerequisite for ART 478 is ART 471. (4)

ART 480. Art Workshop. Intensive workshops of varying length with visiting professors or of a specialized nature, including national/international travel study tours, to supplement the regular curriculum. Summer only. (1-4)

ART 481. Internship in Art. BFA students first select an appropriate field for internship from the art community/industry: professional artist apprentice, arts administration, museum studies, art marketing. Students must negotiate a written contract and complete 45 hours in the field. This course may be repeated three times. Prerequisite: BFA students only. (1)

ART 485. Directed Study. (1-4)

ART 490. Directed Research. (1-9)

ART 492. Assessment of Conceptual Development. Oral and visual presentations to the Art faculty and outside professionals which include written documentation that assesses students’ abilities, artistic identity, and future directions. Prerequisite: BFA students only. (1)

ART 493. BFA Exhibit & Final Portfolio Review. Graduating BFA students will present their final exhibition and be responsible for all aspects of the exhibition.

Students must compile and present their final BFA portfolio. Prerequisite: BFA students only. (1)

ART 495. Tutorial Reading. (1-3)

Automotive Technology

AUTT 103. Principles of Auto Electrical. Basic introduction in general electrical system; battery and service; starting system; charging system; repair and lighting systems diagnosis and repair. Lecture with lab. (5)

AUTT 111. Principles of Auto Brakes. Lecture and lab emphasizing diagnosis and repair of brakes, including anti-lock brake systems; covers such areas as basic hydraulic principles, drum brakes, parking brakes, disc and drum brake service, hydraulic system service, and operation of various brake equipment and tools. (5)

AUTT 137. Basic Gasoline Repair/Rebuilding. Lecture and lab emphasizing general engine diagnosis - removal and reinstallation; cylinder head and valve train diagnosis and repair; engine block assembly diagnosis and repair; lubrication and cooling system diagnosis repair. (5)

AUTT 139. Principles of Electronic Analysis. Lecture and lab on gauges, warning devices, and driver information systems diagnosis and repair; horn and wiper/washer diagnosis and repair; accessories diagnosis and repair. Prerequisite: AUTT 103. (5)

AUTT 141. Manual Transmission/Clutch and Axle. Lecture and lab on general drive train diagnosis; diagnosis and repair of clutch, transmission/transaxle, drive shaft and half shaft, universal and constant-velocity (CV) joint; ring and pinion gears and differential case assembly; limited slip differential; drive axle shaft; four-wheel drive/all wheel drive component diagnosis and repair. (5)

AUTT 190. Field Study I. Field work of variable units to provide the student with a variety of experiences to complement his/her program of study. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1-6)

AUTT 207. Emission and Ignition Control Systems. Lecture and lab on ignition and emission control system; emissions control systems diagnosis and repair/early fuel evaporation (intake manifold temperature) controls. . Prerequisites: AUTT 103,

139. (4)

AUTT 242. Principles of Suspension and Steering and Alignment. Lecture and lab on general suspension and steering systems diagnosis; steering systems diagnosis and repair; suspension systems diagnosis and repair/front suspension; suspension systems diagnosis and repair/rear suspension; suspension systems and diagnosis and repair/miscellaneous service; wheel alignment diagnosis, adjustment and repair; wheel and tire diagnosis and repair. (5)

AUTT 248. Principles of Auto Transmission and Transaxle. General transmission and transaxle diagnosis, maintenance and adjustment in-vehicle transmission and transaxle repair; off-vehicle transmission and transaxle repair/oil pump and converter; off-vehicle transmission and transaxle repair/gear train, shafts, bushings and case; off-vehicle transmission and transaxle repair/friction and reaction units. (5)

AUTT 250. Principles of Automotive Computers. Lecture on computerized engine controls diagnosis and repair. Lecture with lab. (3)

AUTT 252. Automotive Air-Conditioning & Heating Systems. Lecture and lab on A/C system diagnosis and repair; refrigeration system component diagnosis and repair/compressor and clutch; refrigeration system component diagnosis and repair/ evaporator, condenser, and related components; heating, ventilation, and engine cooling systems diagnosis and repair; operating systems and related controls diagnosis and repair; refrigerant recovery, recycling, and handling. Lecture with lab. (5)

AUTT 254. Principles of Auto Fuel Injection/Fuel Systems. Lecture on fuel, air induction, and exhaust systems diagnosis and repair. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: AUTT 103. (3)

Bilingual Education

BLED 255. Current Issues in Bilingual Education. This course will introduce students to the various areas, programs, terminology, and philosophies of bilingual education. (3)

BLED 352. The Secondary Teacher and the Bilingual Child. This course will survey the needs, orientation, and approaches teachers should consider in class instruction for appropriate teaching of Hispanic students in grades 7-12. (3)

BLED 401. Current Issues in Language Minority Education. This meets the requirement for a foundation course for the bilingual and TESOL endorsements. Recommended for all teachers, counselors, and educational administrators who work with language minority communities. (3)

BLED 414. Multicultural Education. This is an education foundations course for Teacher Education, Bilingual Education and English as a Second Language education students. Students will participate in multicultural classroom practices that are grounded in the lives of students, critical, anti-racist, pro-justice, participatory, experiential, visionary, academically rigorous, and culturally sensitive. (3).

BLED 416. Indo-Chicano Cultures and Pedagogy. Contrasting culture patterns including an introduction to historical and sociological aspects of Indigenous and Chicano cultures: prepares the teacher trainee to present units on history, culture, folklore, fine arts and native traditions to students in the Southwest. (3)

BLED 417. Mexican Culture and Pedagogy. The major aspects of historical Mexican values, contributions, current social studies, history, art, and literature. (Taught in Spanish). Required for the bilingual endorsement. (3)

BLED 419. Navajo Culture and Pedagogy. The major aspects of historical Navajo values, contributions, current social studies, history art, and literature (Taught in Navajo). Required for the bilingual endorsement. (3)

BLED 421. Zuni Culture and Pedagogy. The major aspects of historical Zuni values, contributions, current social studies, history art, and literature (Taught in Zuni). Required for the bilingual endorsement. (3)

BLED 424. Teaching Methods in Foreign Language. Specialized techniques of teaching foreign language skills in the elementary and secondary schools. (3)

BLED 427. Linguistics 1 for L2 Teachers. Linguistics 1 for Second Language teachers is a review of the components of language and how these relate to teaching and testing the second language learner. Required for bilingual and TESOL teachers to work in ESL instruction with children, youth and adults. Recommended for all teachers. (3)

BLED 428. Linguistics 2 for L2 Teachers. Linguistics 2 for Second Language teachers covers sociolinguistics and/or phonetics, articulatory phonetics, points and manner of articulation and how these relate to the second language learner, and the bilingual or bicultural child, or the elementary, secondary or adult student. This second level linguistics course prepares teachers to work in ESL instruction. (3)

BLED 431. Language Arts in Spanish. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instruction for appropriate teaching of Spanish speaking students. Emphasis on Language Arts Instruction and Literacy Development. Prerequisite: Spanish proficiency. (3)

BLED 432. Language Arts in Zuni. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instruction for appropriate teaching of Zuni students. Emphasis on Language Arts Instruction and Literacy Development. (3)

BLED 433. Language Arts in Navajo. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instruction for appropriate teaching of Navajo students. Emphasis on Language Arts Instruction and Literacy Development. (3)

BLED 434. Content Literacy in Spanish. Specialized techniques used for teaching the Spanish speaking bilingual and bicultural child: emphasizes instruction in the content areas; required for the bilingual-bicultural programs. (3)

BLED 435. Content Literacy in Zuni. Specialized techniques used for teaching the Zuni bilingual and bicultural child: emphasizes instruction in the content areas; required for the bilingual-bicultural programs. (3)

BLED 436. Content Literacy in Navajo. Specialized techniques used for teaching the Navajo bilingual and bicultural child: emphasizes instruction in the content areas; required for the bilingual-bicultural programs. (3)

BLED 437. Teaching Reading in Spanish. Advanced course in teaching reading and writing in Spanish as a first or second language to children, youth or adults. Survey of the needs, orientations, and approaches teachers should consider in class instructions for appropriate teaching of Hispanic students. Prerequisites: BLED 431 and Spanish proficiency. (3)

BLED 438. Teaching Reading in Zuni. Advanced course in teaching reading and writing in Zuni as a first or second language to children, youth or adults. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instructions for appropriate teaching of Zuni students. (3)

BLED 439. Teaching Reading in Navajo. Advanced course in teaching reading and writing in Navajo as a first or second language to children, youth or adults. Survey of the needs, orientations and approaches teachers should consider in class instructions for appropriate teaching of Navajo students. (3)

BLED 441. English Language Acquisition & Development. The use of ESL techniques and strategies for the English language acquisition of English Language Learners, Required for TESOL endorsement. Recommended for Language Arts Endorsement and as an elective for all educators. (3)

BLED 445. ESL Methods for Content Literacy. Current trends, assessment, and sheltered instruction for literacy development of English Language Learners. Emphasis will be on meeting the standards and outcomes of the New Mexico TESOL endorsement for teaching content using ESL methods. (3)

BLED 480. Bilingual Education Workshop. ESL Programs in current educational theory and practice for school personnel. (1-3)

BLED 485. Directed Study. This is to be used when the student wishes to study a subject not regularly offered. PERMISSION REQUIRED. Please see “Independent Study’’ heading in this catalog.

BLED 490. Directed Research. This is to be used when the student is performing research under the direction of a faculty member. PERMISSION REQUIRED. Please see “Independent Study’’ heading in this catalog.

BLED 495.Tutorial Reading. PERMISSION REQUIRED. Please see “Independent Study’’ heading in this catalog.

*Spanish proficiency means ability to participate in oral and written forms in a University course.

Biology

BIOL 101/103. Biology for General Education I & lab. Lecture and laboratory covering biological principles, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, taxonomy, and anatomy. The intention of this course is to promote an appreciation of the biological world in which we live. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. These courses do fulfill general education requirements but do not apply towards any science degree. BIOL 101 need not be taken prior to 102. (NMCCN BIOL 1113/1111)(Area III). (4)

BIOL 102/104. Biology for General Education II & lab. Lecture and laboratory covering biological principles, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, taxonomy, and anatomy. The intention of this course is to promote an appreciation of the biological world in which we live. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. These courses do fulfill general education requirements but do not apply towards any science degree. BIOL 101 need not be taken prior to 102. (NMCCN BIOL 1123/1121)(Area III). (4)

BIOL 120. Biology of the Southwest. A course for the study of natural areas around Silver City. It is not designed for science majors and minors. No major/minor elective credit or general education credit may be claimed for this course. (4)

BIOL 202/203. Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab. Introduction to plant biology: summarizes the major disciplines of botany and includes study of the more important plant groups: three lectures and one laboratory period per week. This course, BIOL 204, and BIOL 206 constitute the prerequisite for all biology related majors and minors. BIOL 202, 204 and 206 can be taken in any order. (NMCCN BIOL 1213/1211) (Area III). (4)

BIOL 204/205. Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab.

Introductory biology covering biological macromolecules, ecology, evolution, systematics, phylogeny, developmental biology, and a survey of major animal groups; three lectures and one two-hour laboratory a week. This course, BIOL 202, and BIOL 206 constitute the prerequisite for all biology related majors and minors. BIOL 202, 204, and 206 can be taken in any order. (NMCCN BIOL 1223/1221)(Area III). (4)

BIOL 206/207. Majors III: Intro Cell Biology & lab. Introductory biology for majors covering biological molecules, eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell form and function, cellular metabolism and mechanisms of heredity; three lectures and one two-hour laboratory a week. This course, BIOL 202 and 204 constitute the prerequisites for all biology related majors and minors. BIOL 202, 204, and 206 can be taken in any order. (4)

BIOL 210. Scientific Writing. Concentrates on the format and organization of scientific papers, as well as the ability to express ideas and concepts clearly and concisely. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203 and BIOL 204/205. (1)

BIOL 254/256. Anatomy and Physiology I & lab. A course to study both the structure and function of the human body. The mechanisms of homeostasis and the interrelationships of the various body systems will be emphasized. Three lectures and one laboratory per week; needs to be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Two years of high school biology or BIOL 101/103 or BIOL 102/104 or permission of the instructor. (NMCCN BIOL 2413/2411). (4)

BIOL 255/257. Anatomy and Physiology II & lab. A continuation of BIOL 254/256. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 254/256 or permission of the Instructor. (NMCCN BIOL 2423/2421). (4)

BIOL 301/303. Ecology & lab. The study of the interactions between organisms, their abiotic environment, and other biotic components of natural systems; the structure and function of biotic communities and ecosystems; three lectures and one laboratory or field period per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203 and BIOL 204/205. Offered every Spring. (4)

BIOL 310/312. Invertebrate Zoology & lab. Systematic study of invertebrate groups including taxonomy, ecology, anatomy reproduction and natural history of invertebrates; three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 204/205. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 311/313. Vertebrate Zoology & lab. Study of vertebrate animals, their evolution, morphology, and ecology: three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 204/205. Offered every Fall. (4)

BIOL 320. Animal Behavioral Ecology. Focuses on proximate and ultimate explanations for the diversity of behaviors exhibited by animals. Evolutionary consequences of behaviors are evaluated as hypotheses within an ecological context. Prerequisite: BIOL 204/205. Offered alternate years. (3)

BIOL 322/324. Dendrology & lab. Identification and natural history of North American trees, shrubs, and vines, with emphasis on species native to the Southwest. Considerable time spent in field study. Three major projects involving analysis and interpretation of field data collected by the class in lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, 204/205, and 206/207. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 331/333. Biology of Algae and Fungi & lab. Structure, taxonomy, evolution, and ecology of fungi and non-vascular plants; three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 202/203. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 332/334. Evolution and Diversity of Plants & lab. Anatomy, morphology, and evolutionary development of the vascular plants; three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 202/203. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 342. Comparative Physiology. Processes and functions related to the activities of plants and animals; encompasses all levels of organization from cell level to the entire organism; three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, and BIOL 204/205. Offered alternate years. (3)

BIOL 351/353. Plant Taxonomy & lab. Flowering plants and their classification, with emphasis on flora of the Southwest: three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 202/203. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 360/362. Cell Biology & lab. Structure and functional dynamics of living cells; three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 206/207 and either 202/203 or 204/205, and CHEM 151/153. (4)

BIOL 366/368. Genetics & lab. Methods and results of the transmission of hereditary characteristics; three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, 204/205 and BIOL 206/207. (4)

BIOL 371/373. Microbiology & lab. The structure, taxonomy, interaction between microbe and host, and applied microbiology will be studied; the laboratory emphasizes culturing, biochemical tests and the identification of an unknown species; three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: One of the following: BIOL 202/203, BIOL 204/205, BIOL 254/256, or BIOL 255/257, or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years. (NMCCN BIOL 2513/2511). (4)

BIOL 375/377. Principles of Wildlife Biology & lab. This course studies the application of wildlife principles to various animal species. Topics will include population dynamics, species introduction, predator-prey interactions, hunting and management techniques; three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, BIOL 204/205, and BIOL 301/303. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 410/412. Plant Physiology & lab. Course covers basic plant processes, including transport, water balance, nutrition, photosynthesis, defence mechanisms, sensory systems, and plant growth hormones. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, BIOL 204/205, and BIOL 206/207. Two lectures and one lab per week. (4)

BIOL 422. Evolution. The study of changes in natural populations of organisms and the dynamics underlying those changes. Evolutionary processes including mutation, genetic recombination, natural selection, migration, and genetic drift are reviewed, as well as their microevolutionary and macroevolutionary consequences; three lectures or discussion periods per week. Prerequisite: 15 credit hours of biology including BIOL 366. Offered alternate years. (3)

BIOL 425/427 Range Vegetation & lab. Focuses on plants of rangelands of the southwest, with emphasis on identification of range plants and ecology of rangeland plant communities. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203; BIOL 204/205 (4)

BIOL 432. Biogeography. An overview of the planet Earth. Studies of plant and animal distribution are based upon ecological, evolutionary, and physical factors. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours of biology. Offered alternate years. (3)

BIOL 442/443. Ornithology & lab. Introductory scientific study of birds, with emphasis on North American species; three lectures and one laboratory period per week; two Saturday field trips required. Prerequisites: BIOL 202, BIOL 204, and BIOL 311, or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 448/449. Herpetology & lab. The study of amphibians and reptiles will review the evolutionary history, phylogenetic relationships, global diversity, life history, and general biology of these important groups. Laboratory will focus on the identification of the regional herpetofauna; three lectures and one laboratory per week with at least one required weekend field trip. Prerequisites: BIOL 202, BIOL 204, and BIOL 311, or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 450. Methods of Teaching Secondary Science. A broad spectrum of practical instructional problems; design and implementation of laboratory exercises with emphasis on use of original materials; evaluation of current textbooks; ordering of supplies and equipment; practical use of various teaching tools; lesson, unit, and semester planning with testing problems and design; current legal problems and their implications for the science teacher. Offered alternate years. (3)

BIOL 451/453. Mammalogy & lab. The study of fur-bearing animals, including their structure, behavior, life histories, and taxonomic relationship; three lectures and one laboratory period per week; one weekend field trip required. Prerequisite: BIOL 202/203, 204/205, and 311/313 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years. (4)

BIOL 460. Cell Physiology. Focus primarily on cell metabolism, with emphasis on applications of thermodynamics in cell metabolism; enzyme structure, mechanism and regulations; oxygen-independent respiration (glycolysis, fermentation); aerobic respiration (Kreb cycle, electron transport system, chemiosmomosis); and photosynthesis. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, 204/205 and BIOL 206/207. (3)

BIOL 462/464. Comparative Chordate Anatomy & lab. Derivation and descriptive morphology of the major organ systems of chordate animals; three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 204; BIOL 311 recommended. Offered alternate years. (5)

BIOL 465/467. Molecular Genetics & lab. Focus on the molecular basis of inheritance, including nucleic acid chemistry, protein synthesis, DNA mutation and repair, control of gene expression, genetics of cancer, transposable elements, extranuclear inheritance and DNA technology; three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 366/368 or permission of instructor (4)

BIOL 471/473. Majors Microbiology & lab. The study of microbial biology with a focus on structure, metabolsim, taxonomy, and pathogenisis. This course is intended to give students a broad understanding of microbiology including the historical context of many advances in the field. Students will also become familiar with many commonly used laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, 204/205, and BIOL 206/207. (4)

BIOL 472. Readings in Science. An interdisciplinary introduction to the exploration and understanding of primary, scientific literature. Two scientific papers will be read and discussed each week. Outlines of scientific papers and participation in discussions are focal activities. Designed for the upper level undergraduate. Offered alternate years. (3)

BIOL 474. Virology. A broad view into the field of viral biology including animal and plan viruses. The course will describe viral morphology, taxonomy, reproduction, and viral-host interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, 204/205, 206/207. (3)

BIOL 475. Field Biology. Will develop the upper undergraduates ability to design, execute, and report biological field studies. Overnight camping required four nights per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and BIOL 204; BIOL 301/303 recommended. Summers only. (6)

BIOL 476/478. Immunology & lab. Will focus on the fundamentals of the mammalian immune system including innate, acquired, cellular, and humoral immunity. Vaccines, autoimmunity, and hematopoiesis will also be discussed. Prerequisites: BIOL 202/203, 204/205, and 206/207. (4)

BIOL 481. Practicum. For Forest/Wildlife majors only. This course involves 150 hours of volunteer work in the field with professional biologists that gives students practical educational experiences to help prepare them for their professional career. Student must apply to the Advisor of the Forest/Wildlife Program 4 months prior to the beginning of this course. (3)

BIOL 486. Senior Project. Individually tailored research course involving a synthesis of biology disciplines and requiring use of data gathering principles and library facilities; required of all senior students majoring in biology, botany, or zoology. (2)

BIOL 487, 488. Individual Scientific Investigations. Opportunity for independent study under the supervision of a faculty member; selection and execution of a field or laboratory project and preparation of the results in scientific form; may be repeated. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours of college-level biology or permission of the instructor. (3)

BIOL 496. Biology Seminar. Discussion of selected biological topics; devoted to a different subject each semester (as indicated in course schedules available at registrations). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. This course may be repeated up to three times for elective credit. (1)

Business and Office Technology

BOFT 102. Introduction to Keyboarding. Basic keyboard and computer functions. Emphasis is on developing mastery of the keyboard, skillbuilding up to 35 words a minute, and communication skills. Fall only. (3)

BOFT 110. Intermediate Keyboarding/Document Formatting. Beginning word processing features used for the production of all mailable business documents. Emphasis is placed on increasing keyboarding speed up to 45 words a minute and developing accuracy through skill building exercises. Prerequisite: BOFT 102 or equivalent skills. Spring only. (3)

BOFT 114. Records and Information Management. Introduction to the different methods of filing business records and information; emphasizes the life cycle of information within the office structure. Develop functions and concepts of database management systems to master the skills needed for MOS core certification. Fall only. (3)

BOFT 120.Word Processing I. Develop functions and concepts of information/word processing systems to master the skills needed for MOS core certification. Emphasis is on the document processing cycle from origination through distribution and storage using latest word processing software. Prerequisite: BOFT 110. Fall only. (3)

BOFT 123. Business Communications I. Focus on fundamentals of English and standards of usage as applied to business applications. Fall only. (3)

BOFT 124. Windows and the Web. Introduction to current Windows functions and available programs plus use of electronic searches. Emphasis on learning Windows functions, accessories programs, and performing electronic searches and electronic office skills. Prerequisite: BOFT 102. Fall only. (3)

BOFT 125. Business Communications II. Introduction to business writing skills to include writing mechanics and composition. Emphasis on business correspondence to include cross-cultural and international communications. Listening, nonverbal, and speaking skills are reviewed as well as communications for employment. Prerequisites: BOFT 102, 120, and 123. Spring only. (3)

BOFT 181. Internship. Field work to provide the student with a variety of experiences to complement the program of study; designed for students pursuing Associate of Science in Business and Office Technology. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3-6)

BOFT 194. Co-op Work Experience I. Practical work experience for vocational office students, job analysis, application interview, employer and employee relations, and general skill development. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1-6)

BOFT 202. Advanced Keyboarding/Business Applications. Methods for increasing production skills through proper organization and skill building through use of advanced techniques. Develop functions and concepts on automated text-editing software and computers to master the skills needed for MOS core certification. Some emphasis on speed and accuracy in document production. Prerequisite: BOFT 110 or equivalent skills or permission of the instructor. Fall only. (3)

BOFT 206. Office Procedures. Office principles and procedures used in today’s fast changing, computerized offices. Develop a foundation necessary for success in any office setting through real applications, discussion, individual and team projects, and Web research using current technological tools available. Develop functions and concepts on automated text-editing software and computers to master the skills needed for MOS core certification. Prerequisites: BOFT 110, 114, and 123. Spring only. (3)

BOFT 208. Human Relations in the Office. Develop effective human relations skills including teamwork, ethical behavior, critical thinking, and diversity for success in today’s technological office environment. Prerequisites: BOFT 102, 124. Fall only. (3)

BOFT 228. Business Presentation Applications. Develop functions and concepts on electronic presentation software to master the skills needed for MOS core certification. Project based activities applying electronic presentation and Web applications with emphasis on problem solving and using critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: BOFT 202. (3)

BOFT 234. Administrative Office Management. Introduces students to management philosophies and principles of modern administrative practices including human resources; enables the student to make intelligent and timely decisions as part of a management team. Spring only. (3)

BOFT 238. Word Processing II. Develop skills in performing advanced and specialized functions on automated text-editing software and computers to master the skills needed for MOS core certification. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving and critical thinking using advanced software features for document preparation and formatting on expert level projects. Prerequisite: BOFT 120. Spring only. (3)

BOFT 241. Business Computations. Instruction in the essentials of business arithmetic in fundamental computation and problem-solving. Develop functions and concepts of electronic spreadsheet management systems to master the skills needed for MOS core certification. Spring only. (3)

BOFT 248. Accounting Procedures I. Emphasis is given to problems in context of legal and medical professional offices using cash methods of accounting. Fall only. (3)

BOFT 250. Accounting Procedures II. Learn computerized accounting procedures. Prerequisite: BOFT 248 or permission of the instructor. Spring only. (3)

BOFT 285. Directed Study. Extension of knowledge and skills in office studies through independent self-paced studies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1-6)

BOFT 294. Co-op Work Experience II. Practical work experience for vocational office students; job analysis, application/interview, employer and employee relations, and general skill development. Prerequisites: BOFT 194 and permission of the instructor. (1-6)

Business and Public Administration

BSAD 100. Introduction to Business. Fundamental concepts and terminology in the field of business administration; covers areas such as management, marketing, accounting, personnel, and finance. Not acceptable for major credits for Business or Accounting majors. (NMCCN BUSA 1113). (3)

BSAD 152. Entrepreneurship. The process of creating or seizing an opportunity and pursuing it regardless of the resources currently controlled. Not acceptable for major credit for Business or Accounting majors. (3)

BSAD 230. Principles of Financial Accounting. An introduction to financial accounting concepts, including an emphasis on Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the accounting cycle, and basic accounting terminology. (NMCCN ACCT 2113). (3)

BSAD 231. Principles of Managerial Accounting. An introduction to managerial accounting concepts. It includes an introduction to the management process, including the function of planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and decision making. (NMCCN ACCT 2123). (3)

BSAD 300. Legal Environment for Managers. Commercial and government law as it relates to contracts, agencies, employers, employees, negotiable instruments, insurance, and assignments. (NMCCN BLAW 2113). (3)

BSAD 303. Risk and Insurance. Economics and social services of insurance; important principles and practices; typical fire, auto, liability, accident, health, workman’s compensation, and life insurance contracts. (3)

BSAD 306. Principles of Real Estate. Rights and obligations of the real estate agent, history of real estate, regulation of real estate, real estate law, real estate arithmetic, fundamentals of real estate finance, agency, contracts, and real estate applications. (3)

BSAD 331. Financial Accounting I. A detailed study of the various types of assets, liabilities and proprietorships, the making of statements from incomplete data, the use of comparative data, application of funds, and statement analysis. Prerequisites: BSAD 230 and BSAD 231. Fall only. (NMCCN ACCT 2133).(3)

BSAD 332. Financial Accounting II. A detailed study of the various types of assets, liabilities and proprietorships, the making of statements from incomplete data, the use of comparative data, application of funds, and statement analysis. Prerequisites: BSAD 230 and BSAD 231. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 333. Cost Accounting. The costs of production processing and construction of manufactured goods; designed to show how accounting can serve as a means of control. Prerequisites: BSAD 230 and BSAD 231. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 334. Accounting Systems. Processing consideration in the design and operation of accounting systems. Principles of internal control applicable to manual and automated accounting systems. Prerequisites: BSAD 230, BSAD 231, and CMPS 111. (3)

BSAD 336. Fraud Examination. Explores the various forms of fraud, determines how and why fraud is committed, and utilizes accounting information to determine the extent of fraud. Prerequisites: BSAD 230 and 231. (3)

BSAD 340. Principles of Marketing. Study and analysis of the elements of marketing and marketing strategy, stressing product-development policies, pricing strategies, promotion, and distribution strategies, and market structure. (NMCCN MKTG 2113).(3)

BSAD 341. Consumer Behavior. Basic perspectives of consumer behavior; interdisciplinary approach using the fields of economics, psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology as they relate to marketing; emphasizes the fundamental process of motivation, perception, and learning, as well as analysis of individual predispositions and group influences in marketing. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: BSAD 340 (with a C or better). Fall only. (3)

BSAD 342. Product Marketing. Existing and new product marketing management; emphasizes product related marketing concepts of demand forecasting, product differentiation, product development, market development, product life cycles, product management concepts and trends, societal considerations, and international product management. Prerequisites: BSAD 340 and MATH 321. (3)

BSAD 343. Product Promotion. Personal and non-personal promotion activities; emphasized promotion objectives, forecasting and budgeting, promotional components and their interrelation, assessing promotional efficiency and effectiveness, and development of campaigns and related components. Prerequisite: BSAD 340. (3)

BSAD 344. Product Pricing. Existing and new product pricing and management; emphasized pricing objectives, internal and external environment considerations, psychology of pricing, product life cycle considerations, market reaction, societal considerations, pricing strategies, and international marketing considerations. Prerequisites: BSAD 340 and MATH 321. (3)

BSAD 345. Product Placement. Product placement management; emphasizes strategies and their implementation by distribution channel members; includes procurement, handling, control, transfer of ownership of products, facility location and layout, merchandising, market determination, societal and legal considerations, and international product placement considerations. Prerequisite: BSAD 340. (3)

BSAD 350. Principles of Management. The basics of management principles, methods, fundamentals, functions, terminology, techniques, theories, trends, practices, and applications in the modern business organization. (NMCCN MGMT 2113). (3)

BSAD 355. Communication in Business and Industry. The role of organizational communication as a tool for effective management; learn the roles of communication in organizations, fundamentals of business writing, presentations including the use of computer presentations, interoffice communication including memos, e-mail, and other technologies. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: BSAD 350. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 370. Principles of Finance. The organization of corporations in modern business; growth of the business organizations; current financing, insolvency, receiverships, and reorganizations. Prerequisites: BSAD 230 & 231, ECON 201 & 202, CMPS 111, MATH 121, 221, and 321. Fall only. (NMCCN BFIN 2113). (3)

BSAD 430. Financial Accounting III. A continuation of the Financial Accounting sequence. Advanced topics include deferred taxes, pensions, leases, error analysis, and statement of cash flows. Accounting for partnerships is also covered. Prerequisites: BSAD 331 and BSAD 332. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 432. Financial Accounting IV. The conclusion of the Financial Accounting sequence. Special topics include SEC reporting, branch operation, business combinations, governmental entities, bankruptcies, and estates and trusts. Prerequisites: BSAD 331 and BSAD 332. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 433. Tax Accounting. Various state and federal taxes and their influence on the records of the business; emphasizes the federal income tax. Prerequisites: BSAD 230 and BSAD 331. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 434. Advanced Income Tax Accounting. Federal income tax laws with accounting problems in preparation of statements and reports for partnerships, corporations, estates and trusts, and gift taxes. Prerequisite: BSAD 433. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 435. Auditing. Auditing principles and procedures; preliminary considerations, planning types of audits, reports, legal responsibilities, problems, and cases. Prerequisites: BSAD 331 and BSAD 332 (with a C or better). Spring only. (3)

BSAD 437. VITA. The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program provides Federal and State personal income tax preparation help to low income individuals. Open only to accounting students authorized to enroll by the course instructor. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 441. Business Research. Research process and procedures as applied to business; includes problem statement, research methodology, and reporting through the use of cases and actual business problems. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: MATH

321. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 445. Marketing Strategy. Integration of the courses for the marketing concentration; uses the case analysis approach in developing marketing management decision-making and communications abilities. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: Senior-level. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 450. Methods, Materials, and Organization in Business Marketing Teacher Programs. A methods course designed to acquaint business marketing educators with programs, methods, and materials appropriate for such subjects as computer usage, office machines, office procedures, general business, economics, consumer economics, business principles and management, business law, business mathematics, business English, internship programs, bookkeeping, and accounting.

Prerequisite: Acceptance by the School of Education into a secondary education program in Business Marketing Education. Offered alternate years - Spring semester (3)

BSAD 451. Human Resources Management. An analysis and description of present day personnel practice; stresses such matters as source of labor supply, equal employment opportunity, selection of employees, training, collective bargaining, and judging effectiveness of the labor force. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: BSAD 350. (3)

BSAD 452. Organizational Behavior. Analysis of human behavior in organizations from both micro- and macro-orientations, including direct application of theory to management practices. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: BSAD 350. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 454. Decision Making in Environmental Management. A problem solving course analyzing the nature and application of managerial planning and decision making; focus on the design, formulation, implementation, and evaluation of problem solving in complex environments; includes uses and critiques of decision theories, tools, and techniques from entrepreneurs to strategic management. Prerequisite: BSAD 350. (3)

BSAD 456. Labor Relations. A review and analysis of organizational labor systems and the problems involved in their administration. Prerequisites: senior standing, BSAD 300 and 350. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 458. Environmental Policy Analysis. Survey and application of public planning, and evaluation, methods and techniques for increased productivity through quality control with a special emphasis upon local and state planning of policies, programs, personnel, and budgets. Prerequisite: BSAD 350. (3)

BSAD 461. Operations Management. An examination of the production function in service and manufacturing organizations. Qualitative and quantitative methods of improving both quality and efficiency of operations and output. Prerequisites: MATH 321 and BSAD 350. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 471. Intermediate Financial Management. Contemporary financial management theory using case studies; in-depth view of capital budgeting, the cost of capital, capital structure, working capital management, corporate financial decision-making, international finance, and special topics such as security valuation, firm valuation, mergers, and acquisitions, financial leverage, and leasing. Prerequisite: BSAD 370. Spring only. (3)

BSAD 475. Investments. Analysis of investments and the risks and rewards associated with various types of investments; includes portfolio analysis, selection and management of portfolios, valuation and analysis of equities and fixed interest securities, asset pricing, characteristics and the liquidity of securities, regulatory climate and legal issues, and alternative investments (stock options, warrants, commodities, convertible securities, and foreign investments and securities). Prerequisite: BSAD

370. Non-business majors: consent of the instructor. (3)

BSAD 481. Internship in Business. A work experience program directed by a business department faculty member and supervised by an approved cooperating business or government agency that allows the student on the job training. The course is open to students majoring in accounting, business management, and public administration. Requires 150 to 300 hours of work experience, closely supervised by the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (3-6)

BSAD 486. International Business. The international business environments within which business firms operate and the public policies and cultures which influence their activities; includes international finance, legal issues, management, and marketing considerations of the international, transnational, multinational, and global firms. Writing Intensive Prerequisites: BSAD 340, 350, 370, and MATH 321. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 487. International Accounting. Focuses on the world of international accounting and provides the student with both the background necessary to understand international accounting issues and the knowledge of how to resolve the issues. Writing Intensive Prerequisites: BSAD 230, 231, 331, 332 and 370. Fall only. (3)

BSAD 489. Economic Development. An intensive one-week course designed to provide training in the basics of economic development in accordance with curriculum requirements prepared by the American Economic Development Council. Subject material is both theoretical and practical with an emphasis on economic development and its place in New Mexico. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Summer only. (3)

BSAD 497. Business Policies and Management. Integration of various functional business and management areas in a context of policy-level decision-making and strategic analysis; emphasizes independent analysis through case problems. Writing Intensive Prerequisites: Second-semester senior standing or permission of instructor; completion of all other business core courses. (3)

BSAD 498. Special Topics. Content will vary depending upon the thrust of the business administration course that is offered under this course number and title. (3)

Career and Technical Teacher Education CTTE 403. Principles and Practices of Career and Technical Education.

Historical precedents and formative philosophies of career and technical education; effects of legislation on programs; trends and issues regarding contextual teaching and learning, career pathways, school-to-work (experiential learning), tech-prep, and partnerships with business and industry. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: EDUC 311. (3)

CTTE 422. Contextual Teaching and Learning in Career and Technical Education. Contextual teaching and learning in a standards based program that includes the integration of academics with career and technical content using technology; designed to assist pre-service teachers in developing a teacher work sample that includes planning, teaching, assessing, and reflecting on their work with students in their occupational area. Prerequisite: CTTE 403. (3)

CTTE 431. Coordinating Experiential Work-Based Education Programs. Learn to develop and promote effective experiential work-based (cooperative) education programs including the selection, orientation, and training of sponsors; the selection, related instruction, and evaluation of students; and the reporting, record keeping, and program evaluation. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: CTTE 403. (3)

CTTE 475. Methods of Teaching in Career and Technical Education. Develop, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional methods and techniques appropriate for instructing individuals or groups in the classroom, laboratory, job-site, or in a career and technical student organization (CTSO). Emphasis on incorporating content standards in various instructional settings that accommodate student learning styles. Managing student behavior, developing and evaluating learner performance, and communicating results and implications will be addressed. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: CTTE 422. (3)

CTTE 493. Practice Teaching in Career and Technical Education. Seventeen weeks of supervised classroom experience in an accredited secondary school with a reimbursed career and technical education program. The practice teacher will provide increasing responsibility for the instruction, assessment, supervision, and co-curricular activities of an identified group of learners in grades 9-12 in a full-time assignment with licensed educational personnel supervision. Attendance in a seminar is also a course requirement. Seminars will emphasize teaching methods, behavioral management, ethics, multiculturalism, and tutoring/coaching. Micro-teaching exercises will be used to enhance teaching skills. All core/professional courses must be taken prior to Practice Teaching. Writing Intensive Prerequisites: Permission required, taken concurrently with EDUC 436. (9)

Chemical Dependency

CHDP 201. Introduction to Addiction Counseling. This course provides the knowledge of the basic components to the field of addiction counseling. The following areas will be examined: models, functions, meanings, assessment, family, adult children, codependency, shame, intervention, co-occurring disorders, treatment, and prevention. Prerequisites: PSY 102 and SOC 101. (3)

CHDP 303. The Addictive Process. Introduction to the addictive process and looking at the basic characteristics of the addictive process.The course will examine the stages of the addictive process, addictive thinking, types of addictive behavior or compulsions, and the recovery process from the addictive process. Prerequisites: SOC 101 and CHDP 201. (3)

CHDP 304. Helping Skills in Chemical Dependency. An in-depth survey of the major concepts and practices of the contemporary therapeutic approaches. Prerequisites: CHDP 201 and 303. (3)

CHDP 305. Chemical Dependency and the Family. This course provides an understanding of the family dynamics in a chemically dependent family and the interventions which may lead to recovery for family members. It provides a clear understanding of healthy functional families. Prerequisites: CHDP 201 and 303. (3)

CHDP 306. Codependency. Provides the basic principles of codependency. It will develop an understanding of the etiology, symptomatology, and basic treatment techniques of the disordered codependent, from denial to long-term recovery. Prerequisite: CHDP 305. (3)

CHDP 307. Special Populations in Chemical Dependency. Basic knowledge of the special populations that exist in the field of chemical dependency. It will examine the sociocultural factors influencing chemical use among the special populations and the treatment and recovery processes for each special population. Prerequisite: CHDP 303. (3)

CHDP 322. Substance Abuse and Crime. An assessment of the relationship of substance abuse to crime and criminal justice administration. While emphasizing illicit drugs and alcohol, coverage will include a review of drug legislation, drug effects, theories of drug abuse, options for treatment and prevention of drug abuse, enforcement strategies, and analysis of controlled substance policy. Spring only. (3)

CHDP 403. Advanced Helping Skills in Chemical Dependency. Examines the helping relationship, including skills relevant to working with persons affected by chemical dependency. The course will examine qualities of a functional helping relationship and social-psychological issues involved in working with the chemically dependent person. Prerequisite: CHDP 304. (3)

CHDP 404. Professional Principles in Chemical Dependency. Provides an understanding of the professional principles of chemical dependency counseling; examines the 12 core functions, ethical and legal issues, and special issues essential for chemical dependency counseling. Prerequisites: CHDP 304, 306, and 307. (3)

CHDP 408. Annual Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors Institute. Provides state-of-the-art information, training, and techniques in the field of substance abuse counseling. Multiculturalism, gender, age, and other elements of diversity are stressed as is ethics, supervision issues, current research and clinical methods.This program is sponsored by both the National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) and the New Mexico Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors Association (NMADACA). Participation in the 30 hour “Annual WNMU Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors Institute” is required. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (limit to nine hours of credit toward graduation) (3 credits per Institute)

CHDP 421. Dual Diagnosis. Will examine the DSM-IV-TR as a tool for the initial assessment process. The course will examine psychiatric disorders, substances abuse disorders, and show how to diagnose co-occurring disorders. The course will examine treatment planning for dually diagnosed individuals. Prerequisites: CHDP 201, 303, 304, and 305. (3)

CHDP 465 Pharmacology. Will examine the ways that drugs affect the brain and behavior. The content will range from general principles of neurobiology and pharmacology to the actions of specific classes of drugs. The primary focus of the course will be neurobiological and behavioral effect of drugs. Prerequisites: CHDP 201, 303, PSY 315/316, and 412. (3)

CHDP 481. Internship in Chemical Dependency. A supervised field experience utilizing a variety of psychological counseling skills and applications in an appropriate counseling setting under the direction of a professional psychologist. Prerequisites: Minimum of 75 credit hours completed including at least 15 credit hours in chemical dependency and permission of the internship coordinator. (3-6)

CHDP 487. Group Dynamics. Provides the basic knowledge of group process, practice, and techniques used in chemical dependency counseling; examines the stages of development of group process and the techniques used in each stage. Prerequisite: CHDP 403. (3)

Chemistry CHEM 121/123. Chemistry for Life & lab. Introduction to chemistry covering general, and organic; can be used for general education and nursing requirements (Requires some algebra. This course is broader in scope but less intense and/or mathematical on specific topics than General Chemistry 151, 152). This course does not constitute a prerequisite for chemistry majors. (NMCCN CHEM 1113/1111)(Area III). (4)

NOTE: CHEM 121 cannot be taken after successful completion of CHEM 151.

CHEM 151/153. General Chemistry I & lab. Introductory course in chemistry; three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). (NMCCN CHEM 1213/1211)(Area III). (4)

CHEM 152/154. General Chemistry II & lab. Second introductory course in chemistry; three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 151/153. (NMCCN CHEM 1223/1221)(Area III). (4)

CHEM 201/202. Analytical Chemistry & lab. Chemical equilibrium, volumetric and gravimetric analysis; two lectures and two labs per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 152/154. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. (4)

CHEM 301. Instrumental Analysis. Lectures and laboratory work on spectrophotometry (visible, ultraviolet, infrared, and atomic absorption), gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, refractometry, polarimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electroanalytical and radiochemical methods; two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 201/202, or 351/353 and permission of the instructor. Offered spring of even-numbered years.(4)

CHEM 351/353. Organic Chemistry I & lab. Introductory theory and practice of organic chemistry; three lectures and two labs per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 152/154. Offered fall of even-numbered years. (5)

CHEM 352/354. Organic Chemistry II & lab. Second introductory course on the theory and practice of organic chemistry; three lectures and two labs per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 351/353. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. (5)

CHEM 360. Introduction to Biochemistry. The molecules, metabolism, and molecular biology of living cells; three lectures per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 351/353. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. (3)

CHEM 401/403. Physical Chemistry I & lab. Chemical thermodynamics, phase equilibria, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, atomic and molecular structure, and kinetic theory of gases; three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 151/153, 152/154 (4)

CHEM 402/404. Physical Chemistry II & lab. Continued study of chemical thermodynamics, phase equilibria, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, atomic and molecular structure, and kinetic theory of gases; three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 401/403. (4)

CHEM 490. Directed Research. Original chemical research under faculty direction. Emphasis on laboratory work with library use and a written report. May be repeated. Prerequisites: CHEM 354 or equivalent and permission of the Instructor. (1-3)

Chicano Studies

CHIC 253. Introduction to Chicano Studies. A course designed to give students knowledge of the “roots” of the Chicano people, by beginning with the study of the Indian cultures in the Americas before the arrival of the Spaniards and tracing the history of the “Mestizo’’ in the Southwestern part of the United States to the 19th century. (3)

CHIC 353. Literature of the Chicana. A study of the literature of the Mexican American woman, including Chicano feminist literature of the 80’s and 90’s. (3)

CHIC 460. Language Issues of the Chicano. Examination of the various language issues in both English and Spanish which the Chicano has faced in the past and will continue to face into the 21st century. An introduction to qualitative and quantitative research methods to be used in the field for language study. (3)

Communication

COMM 110. Public Speaking. Study and practice of how to speak effectively, and with ease and confidence in a variety of public situations. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better. (NMCCN COMM 1113)(Area I). (3)

COMM 370. Interpersonal Communication. Study of interpersonal communication including nonverbal behavior, content, and relational aspects of messages, relationship development, self-disclosure, and conflict management. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN COMM 1213). (3)

COMM 400. Cross-Cultural Communication. Study of communication between people of differing cultural and sub-cultural backgrounds including the influence of culture on verbal and nonverbal behavior, world views, values, mores, tolerance, prejudices and stereotypes. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

Computer and Network Technology

CNET 100. Introduction to Operating Systems for Technicians. Basic components of modern PC operating systems. DOS, Windows 9.x, NT, 2000, and Linux will be the basis for hands-on exploration. Topics include installation, configuration, management and customization. Prepares students for CNET 120 and 125. Fall only. (3)

CNET 120. A+ Certification Preparation. Prepares the student for the Computer Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) A+ Certification examination. Topics include computer operations, software management of hardware resources, hard disk data storage and data recovery. Prerequisite: CNET 100, CMPS 111. (3)

CNET 130. Network+ Certification Preparation. Prepares the student for the Computer Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) Network+ Certification examination. Topics include networking standards and the OSI model, network protocols, networking media, network architecture, TCP/IP, the internet, and network security. Prerequisites: CNET 100 and CMPS 111. (3)

CNET 181. Internship. Internship. (1-6)

CNET 212. Linux+ Certification Preparation. Prepares the student for the Computer Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) Linux+ Certification examination. Topics include history and development of Linux, Linux file systems, Linux permissions and user account management, and managing network services. Prerequisites: CNET 100, 120, 130, and CMPS 111. (3)

CNET 245. Windows 2000 Professional. Core requirements for Windows 2000 Professional and prepares students for the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) exam 70-210, installing, configuring, and administering Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional. This course develops real world system support expertise by mastering the concepts, procedures and tasks measured by certification exam objectives. Prerequisite: CNET 132. Spring only. (3)

CNET 250. Windows Server I. Covers Section I of the core requirements for the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) Windows server exam. Topics include installing and configuring Windows server, unattended installations, Windows file systems, and active directory services. This course is divided into two sections, CNET 250 and CNET 255. Prerequisites: CNET 100 and CMPS 111. (3)

CNET 255. Windows Server II. Covers Section II of the core requirements for the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) Windows exam. Topics include administering Windows server, network protocols and services, routing and remote access service, and Windows network security. This course is divided into two sections, CNET 250 and CNET 255. Prerequisite: CNET 250. (3)

CNET 260. Windows Network Infrastructure I. Covers Section I of the core requirements for the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) Windows Network Infrastructure exam. Topics include understanding Windows server networks, understanding TCP/IP, monitoring and troubleshooting TCP/IP connections, and implementing a DNS infrastructure. This course is divided into two sections, CNET 260 and CNET 265. Prerequisites: CNET 100, 120, 130, 245, and CMPS 111. (3)

CNET 265. CCNA Certification Preparation I. Recommended for individuals seeking an understanding and knowledge of networking fundamentals including the OSI Reference model concept, TCP/IP DoD Model concept, network terminology and technologies. The course also provides basic knowledge and skills to configure CISCO IOS for internetwork (LANSs and WANs) connectivity. Prerequisites: CNET 100, 120, 130, and CMPS 111. (3)

CNET 270. Cabling Fundamentals. Is designed to teach Network Cabling concepts by providing detailed characteristics of the commonly-used cable types for voice and data. The course materials meet the requirements for the BICSI Installer Level I exam objectives. Prerequisite: CNET 120. (3)

CNET 271. Windows Network Infrastructure II. Covers Section II of the core requirements for the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) Windows Network Infrastructure exam. Topics include configuring DHCP servers and clients, routing with windows server, and managing network security. This course is divided into two sections, CNET 260 and CNET 271. Prerequisite: CNET 260. (3)

CNET 272. CCNA Certification Preparation II. Focuses on using CISCO Catalyst and routers connected in LANs and WANs typically found at small to medium network sites. Upon completion of the course, students will have acquired necessary knowledge and skills to select, connect, configure, and troubleshoot various CISCO internet-working devices. This course is recommended training for those individuals seeking CCNA certification. Prerequisites: CNET 100, 120, 130, 165, and CMPS 111. (3)

CNET 275. Security+ Certification Preparation. Students will acquire the knowledge of current security technologies and policies, and the skill to effectively combat hackers, attacks, and security threats. Emphasis will be on five areas: general security concepts, communication security, infrastructure security, basics of cryptography, and operational and organizational security. Prerequisites: CNET 100, 120, 130, and CMPS 111. (3)

CNET 281. Internship in Technical Computer Support. A technically supported internship in a location approved by the University. This internship may or may not be a paid position. In addition, students meet once a week in the classroom to share work experiences and exchange ideas. Communication skills with the customer is emphasized. (1-6)

Computer Science

CMPS 110 Computer Literacy - MacIntosh. Overview of computer hardware, computer operation, use of computer software; word processors, data bases, spread sheets, etc; offered for students who are not majors or minors in computer science. Macintosh. Credit will only be given once, for CMPS 110 or CMPS 111, but not both. (NMCCN BCIS 1113) (3)

CMPS 111. Computer Literacy - PC. Introduces the student to the elements of the computer and management information systems in the business setting; emphasized personal computers and popular business packages. Credit will only be given once, for CMPS 110 or CMPS 111, but not both. (NMCCN BCIS 1113). (3)

CMPS 118. FORTRAN Programming Language. Introduction to FORTRAN programming; develops the FORTRAN computer language in sufficient detail to permit students to write simple programs and to solve problems as applied to various subject fields. (3)

CMPS 140. Introduction to Computer Science. An overview of the Computer Science field including data/information flow, elementary data structures, problem analysis and algorithm design; conceptual foundation for logical structures, control structures, arrays, design considerations, I/O operations and others. Introduction to structural programming, object-oriented programming, the use of scripting languages, and an introduction to a programming development environment. (3)

CMPS 161. COBOL Programming Language. A study of the Common Business Orientation Language; program formation, coding, testing, and documentation developed through computer programs, with application to business problems. (3)

CMPS 170. Computer Programming Fundamentals. The logical and numerical basis of computer operation, control of information flow, elementary data structures, problem and algorithm design, structural programming, numeric and non-numeric applications using a subset of one or more high-level languages; for majors and minors of computer science. Prerequisite: MATH 111 or permission of the instructor. (3)

CMPS 240. Problem Solving. Development of top-down design; further investigation of arrays, records, file processing, recursion, and pointers. Prerequisite: CMPS 170. (3)

CMPS 260. Computer Applications. A continuation of Computer Literacy covering advanced topics such as desktop publishing, internet usage, networking, and elementary programming. No credit for CMPS majors or minors. Prerequisites: CMPS 110, CMPS 111 or permission of the instructor. (3)

CMPS 263. Databases. The system analysis concepts applied to the overall design of long term databases. Analysis, design, and processing of real databases. Prerequisite: CMPS 110 or CMPS 111. (3)

CMPS 265. eCommerce Application Development. Application of programming skills in the eCommerce environment including networking and database processing concepts used in eCommerce and eBusiness. Course includes the analysis, design, and implementation of an eCommerce system. Prerequisites: CMPS 111, 170, and 263. (3)

CMPS 270. System Administration, Software Integration and Planning. Exploration and skill development of Lights-Out computing and integration of Off the Shelf software products as part of hardware and software configuration management. Prerequisites: CMPS 170 and 263. (3)

CMPS 296. Associate Degree Project. Students are required to propose and create an individual project of appropriate focus, size, and complexity, and to write a project document that discusses the project in a narrative form. Upon completion of the project, both the project and project document must be approved by the department. Prerequisites: CMPS 240, 265, and 270. (3)

CMPS 320. Architecture and Assembly Language. Fundamentals of digital computer design including gates, flip-flops, Karnaugh maps, state tables, elementary circuit design, register transfer instructions, machine and assembly language, assemblers and computer memories. Prerequisite: CMPS 170. (3)

CMPS 323. Programming Languages. A study of the essential questions concerning implementation and behavior of high level programming languages; compares many languages, both historically and morphologically. Prerequisite: CMPS 240. (3)

CMPS 330. Platform Independent Programming. Introducing the concept of a virtual machine and its associated programming language. The object-oriented classes supporting the graphical user interface of the virtual machine are examined in the syntactical context of the programming language. Prerequisite: CMPS 240. (3)

CMPS 333. Data Analysis. Use of spreadsheets in business data analysis. Prerequisite: CMPS 111. (3)

CMPS 350. Data Structures. Introduction to the concepts of stacks, linked lists, binary trees, and queues; covers the programming techniques necessary for using these structures. Prerequisite: CMPS 240. (3)

CMPS 354. Networking and Communications. Communications media, data codes, interfaces, protocols, modems, multiplexers, network hardware, and network management. Prerequisite: CMPS 240. (3)

CMPS 362. Systems Analysis and Design. An in depth study of the systems development lifecycle. Analysis tools for each cycle phase will be studied and used in sample cases. Analysis, planning and communication in the project environment will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CMPS 260. (3)

CMPS 365. Programming for MIS. Study of planning, analysis, construction, implementation, processing, and maintenance of computer software systems using a modern visual programming language. Prerequisite: CMPS 260. (3)

CMPS 370. Application Development Techniques. An exploration of a development environment for software applications including user interface design, library utilization and operating system considerations. Prerequisite: CMPS 240. (3)

CMPS 403. Desktop Publishing. An introduction to desktop publishing using a hands-on approach. Topics of interest include integration of text, graphics, and page layouts. Course assignments will include projects such as posters, curriculum vitae, and newsletters. (3)

CMPS 405. MIS for Managers. Concepts of MIS from a user’s perspective; explores the questions of: What is MIS? How do I use information as a manager? How do I use the MIS department to get the information I need in a form I can understand and use? This is a non-programming computer course. Prerequisite: BSAD 350, CMPS 110 or 111. (3)

CMPS 410. Analysis of Algorithms. The study of fundamental techniques used to design and analyze efficient algorithms; time and space complexity; searching and sorting algorithms; complexity and NP-complete problems. Prerequisites: CMPS 240 and MATH 171. (3)

CMPS 415. Advanced Concepts of Databases. Analysis, design, processing, and administration of real databases. Prerequisite: CMPS 263. (3)

CMPS 420. Operating Systems. Multiprogramming and multiprocessing, memory management, systems accounting, interprocess communications, interfaces, and feedback. Real world contact with modern operating systems. Prerequisite: CMPS

240. (3)

CMPS 430. Computer Graphics. An investigation of the methods of computer graphics including hardware, coordinate systems, two-dimensional transformations, graphics data structures, windows and viewports, three-dimensional projections, perspective, and hidden line removal. Prerequisite: CMPS 240. (3)

CMPS 435. e-Commerce. A ground up development of a web-based business will be undertaken. Tools and skills required for e-commerce will be developed and utilized. Online testing and practical experience are given essentials. Prerequisites: CMPS 263, CMPS 362, and CMPS 365. (3)

CMPS 440. Information Warfare. Overview of the workings of Information Warfare in various settings, including, but not limited to, code (cipher) making and breaking, social engineering, hacking, denial of service, software nicking, nasty dealing, problem solving, web research and paper writing. Intended for upper-class Computer Science and Business majors and some others by instructor consent. No programming skills are required, although those who have certain skills may be given assignments to prepare and present to the class. Prerequisite: CMPS 405. (3)

CMPS 450. Advanced Object-Oriented Programming. An introduction to current techniques and methods of object oriented programming, including class libraries, inheritance, data hiding, object creation, polymorphism, and exceptions. Prerequisite: CMPS 330. (3)

CMPS 460. A-B-C Seminar in Computer Science. Independent projects in computer science under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: six hours of upper-division CMPS. (1 each)

CMPS 467. Information Systems Networking. The essentials of networking will be covered from a management perspective. Practical examples and experience will be provided as course elements. Topologies and operations, monitoring and security issues from an organizational perspective will be studied in depth. Prerequisites: CMPS 362 and 365. (3)

CMPS 470.Topics in MIS. Selected topics in MIS will vary from offering to offering. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (3)

CMPS 496. Senior Project and Seminar. A culmination of the computer science major with a full semester project bringing together the various concepts of computer science. The student(s) will meet with the faculty in a seminar format to choose a project, make progress reports and make a final presentation detailing the project with documentation and performance results. (3)

Construction Technology

CNST 101. Introduction to Building Trades. Orientation to building materials, fasteners, adhesives, and hand and power tool applications. Lecture with lab. (3)

CNST 104. General Construction Application. Basic introduction to construction math, blueprint reading, and rigging practices. (3)

CNST 106. Construction Safety and Tools. Safety concepts illustrating the use and maintenance of basic hand and power tools. (2)

CNST 112. Framing Floors and Walls. Basic procedures and the construction of wood floors, walls, and ceilings; to include layout, framing rough openings, and sheathing applications. Lecture with lab. (4)

CNST 114. Print Reading and Site Layout. Overview of blueprint reading and specifications related to drawings; to include the principles of site layout and distance measurement. (3)

CNST 120. Site Built and Manufactured Concrete Forms. Covers the construction of various types of concrete and the application of manufactured concrete forms. Lecture with lab. Prerequisites: CNST 101, 104, 106, 112, and 114. (4)

CNST 124. Exterior Finishing and Roofing Applications. Covers the installation of exterior siding, gutters, and downspouts. Applications of various types of roofing and venting, with an emphasis on safety. Lecture with lab. Prerequisites: CNST 101, 104, 106, 112, and 114. (5)

CNST 126. Principal Layouts of Roofs, Windows and Doors. Introduction in the layout and construction of hip, valley, and gable roofs and procedures used in installing windows and doors. Lecture with lab. Prerequisites: CNST 101, 104, 106, 112, 114 or permission of the instructor. (4)

CNST 128. Fundamentals of Concrete, Reinforcing, Foundations and Flatwork.

Describes the properties and characteristics for various types of concrete, procedures for concrete volume estimates and reinforcement materials. Demonstrations of concrete forming methods for different job site projects. Prerequisites: CNST 101, 104, 106, 112, 114 or permission of the instructor. (2)

CNST 230. Handling and Placing Concrete. Covers the reinforcement, equipment, handling, and placement of concrete with an emphasis on finishing and safety. Lecture with lab. Prerequisites: CNST 120, 126, and 128. (4)

CNST 232. Techniques in Installing Drywall and Insulation. Covers the installation of insulation vapor barriers, gypsum board fastening and finishing tools. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: CMPS 230. (4)

CNST 234. Building Commercial and Residential Stairs. A basic and advanced program in stair layout and finishing. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: CNST 106 or permission of the instructor. (3)

CNST 236. Framing with Metal. Introduction to the installation of metal framing assembly techniques; to include walls, windows, roofs, and door placements. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: CNST 126 or permission of the instructor. (3)

CNST 238. Interior Finishes. Covers tools, methods, and materials used in interior finishing; includes doors, suspended ceilings, trim, and cabinet installation. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: CNST 106 or permission of the instructor. (4)

CNST 240. Advanced Roof, Floor and Wall Systems. Introduces the student to various types of roofing and roof structures; various types of concrete floor, slab, deck systems, and the methods for installing them; covers advanced and different wall systems and general methods used in their construction. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: CNST 232 or permission of the instructor. (4)

CNST 246. Preparation of Job Site Equipment Management. Covers the principles, equipment, and methods used to perform the site layout tasks; includes light equipment maintenance and operation. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: CNST 106 or permission of the instructor. (3)

CNST 262. Construction Supervision. Lecture designed to instruct those building technology students wishing to obtain a “GB 98” General Contractor’s License: emphasizing efficient use of labor, money, and materials and an extension of framing and roofing. Prerequisite: CNST 108. Spring only. (3)

Criminal Justice

CJUS 101. Law Enforcement Training Academy I. The spring semester portion of a program covering training topics and skills which must be mastered in order to become eligible for certification as a police officer in the State of New Mexico. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Spring only. (14)

CJUS 102. Law Enforcement Training Academy II. The summer session portion of a program covering training topics and skills which must be mastered in order to become eligible for certification as a police officer in the State of New Mexico. Prerequisites: CJUS 101 and permission of the instructor. Summer only. (10)

CJUS 111. Introduction to Criminal Justice. An examination of the structural framework of the criminal justice system in the United States. The function, role, and practices of the police, the courts, and corrections will be explained and career opportunities in the administration of justice explored. Fall only. (NMCCN CRJI 1113). (3)

CJUS 175. Field Study I. A field work course of variable units to provide the student with a variety of experiences to complement the program of study; designed for students pursuing an Associate of Science in Criminal Justice. (1-3)

CJUS 205. Substantive Criminal Law. An introductory study of criminal law that addresses the classification of crime, the elements and parties to a crime, defenses against criminal responsibility, concepts related to jurisdiction, and pertinent judicial decisions. Crimes against persons and property will be analyzed. Fall only. (NMCCN CRJI 2053). (3)

CJUS 210. Police and Society. A comprehensive look at police in America ranging from the historical evolution of police systems to an analysis of the work of police officers. Law enforcement jurisdiction will be explored along with issues related to police discretion, deviance, use of force, selection, socialization, and stress. Spring only. (NMCCN CRJI 2103). (3)

CJUS 222. Constitutional Criminal Procedure. An examination of the constitutional principles relating to the investigation of crimes, arrest, confessions, and pretrial processing of offenders. The focus will be on individual rights found in the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution and the comparable provisions of the New Mexico Constitution. Fall only. (3)

CJUS 230. Introduction to Corrections. An examination of the history, philosophy, and practices associated with the correction of persons convicted of crimes in the United States. Criminal sentencing, probation, incarceration, parole and community-based corrections will be explored and critical issues discussed. Fall only. (NMCCN CRJI 2303). (3)

CJUS 232. Criminal Investigation. An introduction to the investigative process and techniques associated with crime scene searches, development of information, interviewing and interrogation, proactive investigation, and case reporting and courtroom preparation. Principles of evidence and investigative steps associated with specific crimes will be addressed. Fall only. (3)

CJUS 250. Courts and the Criminal Justice System. A theoretical and practical examination of America’s court system as one of several different methods of resolving disputes in society. Considerable emphasis will be placed on courtroom procedures and concepts of evidence. The functions and roles of prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, police, and probation officers will be examined. Spring only. (NMCCN CRJI 2503). (3)

CJUS 251. Institutional Corrections. A detailed exposure to correctional facilities used for the punishment of those convicted of crimes. The evolution of the penal institution, levels of custodial security, and issues relating to custody, treatment, and programs within penal institutions will be explored. Field trips to correctional facilities will be included in this course. Prerequisite: CJUS 230 or permission of the instructor. Spring only. (3)

CJUS 260. Juvenile Justice and Delinquency. A study of the historical, philosophical, and practical aspects of juvenile justice administration in the United States. An interdisciplinary focus on factors and theories of delinquency, concepts of treatment, and programs aimed at delinquency prevention are offered. Spring only. (NMCCN CRJI 2603). (3)

CJUS 311. Police Administration and Management. A survey of the complexities of organizing and managing a police agency. A variety of topics are covered including principles of organizing and operating police agencies, leadership, policy formulation, and human resource management. Traditional and non-traditional management principles are addressed. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: CJUS 210 or permission of the instructor. Fall only. (3)

CJUS 314. Sex Crimes and Serial Killers. This course explores the methods and

motives behind serial killers and those who commit sex crimes. (3) CJUS 315. Profiling Violent Crimes. Profiling or criminal investigation assessment is an educated attempt to determine the type of individual committing violent crimes. This course will explore different profiling methods that are utilized by police to either predict future crimes or identify possible offenders. (3)

CJUS 321. Criminal Justice and Minorities. The relationship of minorities, crime, and criminal justice administration is analyzed by focusing on minorities as employees of the criminal justice system, as crime victims, and as accused and convicted criminals. Improved understanding and cooperation between minorities and criminal justice practitioners is explored by analyzing selected minority groups. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: CJUS 111. Fall only. (3)

CJUS 331. Corrections Law. An analysis of the legal principles related to the rights and status of persons convicted of crimes in the United States. Constitutional principles related to sentencing probation, incarceration, and parole; legal obligations and liabilities of corrections agencies and their employees. Prerequisite: CJUS 230 or permission of the instructor. Spring even-numbered years. (3)

CJUS 342. Community Policing. While emphasizing the need for a strong police-community partnership, this progressive and proactive approach to policing society will emphasize problem solving in communities, alternative policing methods, policing special populations, and implications for traditional assumptions about the police role. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: CJUS 210 or permission of the instructor. Spring only. (3)

CJUS 347. Response to Terrorism and Natural Disasters. This course will give First Responders a realistic understanding of what to expect following a terrorism incident or natural disaster and how local and state agencies should plan for such incidents. Students will examine the similarities and differences in planning for different types of incidents and the resources necessary for an adequate response. (3)

CJUS 352. Corrections Administration and Management. A survey of theory and practice in corrections management. Principles of organization and operation of correctional centers will be addressed with emphasis on program development, leadership and supervision, decision-making, policy formulation, planned change, and human resource management. Prerequisites: CJUS 230, 251. Offered occasionally. (3)

CJUS 361. Community Based Corrections. A detailed analysis of community corrections with particular emphasis on the theory and practice of probation and parole. The philosophical basis of community corrections will be explored in the context of diversion, pretrial release programs, restitution and community service, halfway houses and programs for juveniles. Prerequisite: CJUS 230 or permission of the instructor. Fall only. (3)

CJUS 362. Community Resources in Correction. Exposure to existent resources useful in developing corrections programming along with practical application of resource development skills. Stress is placed on developing an inventory of services useful in corrections, identifying offender needs, and referring offenders to services. Prerequisite: CJUS 230 or permission of the instructor. Offered occasionally. (3)

CJUS/SWK 370. Child Welfare. Familiarizes the student with issues, policies, procedures, basic competencies, and proficiencies pertaining to child welfare and permanency planning. It provides an overview of child abuse and neglect, family preservation and reunification, out-of-home placements, and the consequences of long-term maltreatment. (3)

CJUS 417. Frontier Law Enforcement. An examination of the law enforcement officer on the Western Frontier. The responsibilities, experiences, tactics, political environment, challenges, and day-to-day life of the frontier sheriff with particular emphasis given to Arizona and New Mexico Territories. (3)

CJUS 422. Victimology. An introduction to the extent and nature of victimization, victim characteristics, theories of victimization, and governmental response.This will include an examination of the literature to acquaint the student with the history and philosophy of the study of victimization. Prerequisite: CJUS 111 or SOC 331, or permission of the instructor. Offered occasionally. (3)

CJUS 431. Ethics and Liability. Examines various ethical systems and their application to ethical choices faced by criminal justice professionals. Decision-making is assessed further by examination of criminal and civil liability of improper conduct. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: CJUS 222 or 331 or permission of the instructor. Spring odd-numbered years. (3)

CJUS 432. American Crime Policy. A critical review of crime policy in the United States that analyzes both conservative and liberal prescriptions for crime control and the administration of justice.Through the encouragement of thinking and debate on issues, and with general guidance offered, the process of policy development and implementation is realized. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: CJUS 111 or SOC 331 or permission of the instructor. Fall only. (3)

CJUS 441. Organized Crime. A detailed look at organized crime in the United States from both the traditional and non-traditional perspective. Criminal syndicates ranging from the Mafia and drug trafficking syndicates to motorcycle gangs; enforcement strategies and public crime policy with respect to this form of criminal behavior. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: CJUS 111 or SOC 331. Fall odd-numbered years. (3)

CJUS 462. Corrections Methods and Procedures. Indoctrination in corrections procedures and techniques useful in providing treatment and programming for offenders. Investigative approaches, interviewing strategies, offender assessment and treatment plans, classification models, counseling models, case management issues, and prediction tools are introduced and utilized. Prerequisite: CJUS 230. Offered occasionally. (3)

CJUS 481. Internship in Criminal Justice. A planned program of observation and practical experience in a selected agency which is directly or indirectly involved in the administration of criminal justice. Emphasis is on providing the student with the opportunity to obtain work experience and to apply criminal justice concepts and

theory in practice. Writing Intensive Prerequisites: Minimum of 75 credit hours completed including at least 15 credit hours in criminal justice and permission of the internship coordinator. (3-6)

CJUS 498. Seminar in Criminal Justice. A special offering that addresses an area of criminal justice administration. Courses offered will be taught by visiting lecturers and regular faculty, and will focus on topics of special concern to those administering criminal justice in communities. Prerequisites: Established as needed. six credits maximum applicable to CJUS program requirements. Offered occasionally (1-3)

Developmental Studies

DVSM 101. Developmental Math. A review of mathematical computations and problem solving for the student whose background in basic arithmetic skills needs strengthening. (3)

DVSM 102. Developmental Algebra. Introduces algebra to the student with little or no algebra background. Prerequisite: DVSM 101 or appropriate placement score. (3)

DVSR 101. Developmental Reading I. Improve vocabulary and reading comprehension through sentence and paragraph analysis of literature in preparation for DVSR 102. Outlining, charting, and notetaking are also covered. (3)

DVSR 102. Developmental Reading II. Analysis of literature essays in order to improve comprehension, vocabulary, and critical thinking in preparation for ENGL

101. (3)

DVSW 101. Developmental Writing I. Basic writing concepts for students going on to DVSW 102; with literature as models, emphasizes basic grammar, sentence construction, topic sentences, and the organization of the paragraph. (3)

DVSW 102. Developmental Writing II. Basic writing concepts for students planning to enroll in English 101; with literature as models, emphasizes basic organization, topic sentences, paragraph construction, and the development of a thesis. (3)

NOTE: Developmental Studies courses do not meet General Education requirements or count towards degree completion in any way. Students who place into a developmental course must complete it with a C or better before moving to the next course and before enrolling in General Education courses in those areas.

Digital Media Communication

DMC 105. Digital Film Editing w/ Final Cut Pro I. This hands-on course introduces students to the primary feature set and basic interface of Final Cut Pro. Students will learn to perform basic editing functions such as: edit in the timeline, trim techniques, how to set markers, capture video and audio as well as how to apply transitions and importing and exporting video, graphics, animations and text. Topics include basic setup, adjusting and customizing preferences and settings, capturing video and audio, various editing and trimming techniques, ripple, roll, slip and slide tools, audio editing and audio creation, finishing, and final output. (3)

DMC 110. Image Editing w/ Photoshop I. Students will familiarize themselves with image editing using Photoshop. Students will use Photoshop tools for painting, retouching, and enhancing images. Students will learn to work with layers and layer selections. Target Student: Students who want to create and design graphics using Photoshop for Multimedia output. Photoshop is an industry standard for companies, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies large and small. Photoshop is widely used in the creative media, advertising agencies, and production houses. Prerequisite: Basic computer skills are necessary to complete this course. (3)

DMC 115. Motion Graphics & Visual Effects w/ Adobe After Effects I. Students explores the After Effects working environment and examine how to set up an After Effects composition. Students will create motion graphics and visual effects for film, video, DVD, and the Web. Students will learn to composite 2D and 3D layers. Students will discover how to paint on layers with built-in vector painting tools similar to the (still) image vector painting of Photoshop. This course will introduce students to animation of still images, movies, and vector artwork by setting key frames for layer properties. (4)

DMC 120. Digital Film Editing w/ Final Cut Pro II. This hands-on course introduces students to the advanced feature sets of Final Cut Pro. Students will learn to perform multiple editing functions such as: insert edits in the timeline, trim techniques, organizing markers, capture video and audio for larger projects. Students will apply advanced transition and effects and further import and export video, graphics, animation, and text. Topics include basic setup, adjusting and customizing preferences and settings, capturing video and audio, various editing and trimming techniques, ripple, roll, slip and slide tools, audio editing and audio creations, finishing and final output. Prerequisite: DMC 105. (3)

DMC 125. Image Editing w/ Photoshop II. Students advance their working knowledge of advanced image editing using Photoshop. Students will use Photoshop tools for more difficult methods of digital composition tools including; painting, retouching, and enhancing analogue and digital images. Students will learn to work with increased numbers of layers and layer selection. Prerequisite: Basic computer skills are necessary to complete this course. Prerequisite: DMC 110. (3)

DMC 130. Motion Graphics & Visual Effects w/ Adobe After Effects II. Students learn to explore the advanced tools of Adobe After Effects. Students will create advanced motion graphics and visual effects for film, video, DVD, and the Web. Students will master 3D compositions and layers. Students will further learn how to paint on layers with built-in vector painting tools similar to the (still) image vector painting of Photoshop. Prerequisite: DMC 115. (4)

DMC 200. Macromedia I. Students design and develop interactive experiences. Using the applications of Macromedia Studio 8, students design and develop interactive media, applications, presentations and mobile content. This course introduces the students to the software environment of the leading development tools of Studio 8 including Flash Professional, Firworks, Contribute, and FlashPaper. These are advanced tools to create and collaborate in the production of multimedia. Prerequisite: Intermediate computer skills are necessary to compete this course. (3)

DMC 205. Digital Field Production I. Students complete assigned readings, view demonstrations, and complete hands-on exercises focused on techniques and methods of field production of electronic sound and image. The course has an emphasis on video field production and digital acquisition for successful nonlinear editing. (3)

DMC 210. Audio Production I. The student will complete assigned readings, view demonstrations, and complete hands-on exercises focused on techniques and methods of audio production of electronic sound. The course has an emphasis on audio for video production. Students are expected to function in a digital acquisition (production) and postproduction environment for successful nonlinear audio editing. (3)

DMC 215. Adobe Illustrator I. Adobe Illustrator is a sophisticated graphics program capable of creating complex and attractive illustrations and type effects. Students may use Adobe Illustrator to create logos, advertisements and other illustrations. The student with little or no experience with Illustrator, creating complex illustrations can be overwhelming. The student will start by drawing and manipulating simple shapes to create logos. The student will also combine graphics and text. Students will learn to create complex illustrations and enhance their appearance and go beyond the basic. The student will control colors across a range of devices and control how illustrations print and appear on the screen and online. (3)

DMC 220. Macromedia II. Students design and develop advanced interactive experiences. Using the applications of Macromedia Studio 8, students design and develop interactive media, applications, presentations and mobile content. This course introduces the students to the software environment of the leading development tools of Studio 8 including Flash Professional, Firworks, Contribute, and FlashPaper. Students familiarize themseleves with Studio 8 software tools to produce, create, and collaborate in the production of multimedia. Prerequisites: Intermediate computer skills are necessary to complete this course. Prerequisite: DMC 200. (3)

DMC 225. Digital Field Production II. Students will complete assigned readings, view demonstrations, and complete hands-on exercises focused on techniques and methods of field production of electronic sound and image. The course has an emphasis on digital audio and video field production and digital acquisition for nonlinear editing. Prerequisite: DMC 205. (3)

DMC 230. Audio Production II. Students will complete assigned readings, view demonstrations, and complete hands-on exercises focused on techniques and methods of audio production of digital audio. The course has an emphasis on audio for video production but is also applicable for radio and pod casting. Students are expected to function in a digital acquisition (production) and postproduction environment for successful nonlinear audio editing. Prerequisite: DMC 210. (3)

DMC 235. Portfolio Review. Individual production projects in film or video facilitated by instructor or WNMU graduate committee critiques. Students enrolled in Portfolio Review are expected to refine already completed work and prepare it for presentation to advanced academic (e.g. graduate school) and/or professional career objectives. (4)

Drafting and Design Technology

DFDT 111. Introduction to AutoCAD. Explore basic drawing concepts within the AutoCAD drawing software. Both 2D and some 3D drawing applications will be covered. Hands on drawing with AutoCAD is required for this class. Fall only. (3)

DFDT 115. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems W/ArcMAP.

Geographic Information System (GIS) is a computer-based data processing tool used to manage and analyze spatial information. Introduces students to the theory and techniques of GIS including spatial data capture, management and analysis, and cartographic output. Emphasis is placed on the use of technical analysis and software in order to provide students with skills and a conceptual base on which they can build further expertise in GIS. Especially useful for Geography, Environmental Science, Economics, and land-use planning majors. Prerequisite: DFDT 111 and MATH 111. (3)

DFDT 116. Elementary Architectural AutoCAD. Fundamentals of drafting for residential and light building construction; use of instruments, scales, lettering, multiview projection and basic drafting practice as applied to architectural drawings; covers principles of design and preliminary planning for a modern residence, and the generation of a set of working drawings in accordance with local codes and minimum FHA standards. The use of computer aided design will be employed in this class. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fall only. (3).

DFDT 117. Commercial Architectural AutoCAD. Continuation of elementary architectural AutoCAD. In-depth study of Architectural style and planning with a closer look into each part of the working drawings. Also covered will be loads and weights. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Spring only. (3)

DFDT 120. Civil AutoCAD. This area of Drafting will provide the student with technical information on interpreting surveyor’s notes and maps, using map scales and measurements, appropriate use of standard symbols and abbreviations, legal land descriptions and hands on application of map drafting procedures and principles. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Spring only. (3)

DFDT 183. Brief Guide to AutoCAD. Provides methods to enable students to learn to use AutoCAD in the easiest possible manner. They should understand the basics for using the software and then apply this to their own areas of expertise. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fall only. (3)

DFDT 185. Directed Study. Students initiated, independent self-paced study in drafting and design. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1-6)

DFDT 201. Mechanical/Electrical AutoCAD. Basic concepts of electronic symbols and an overall view of drawing types plus a study of perspective drawings and axonometric drawings; basic line shading techniques as applied to single parts, as well as exploded parts and assembly. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fall only. (3)

DFDT 210. Strength of Materials. Introduces the basic principles of classification, behavior, fatigue failure, magnetic and stress properties of cements, concrete, woods, polymers, and metals. Prerequisite: MATH 111. Spring only. (3)

DFDT 215 Printing/Plotting in AutoCAD. This course is intended for AutoCad users. It is designed and structured for class and real world applications using the latest technology in Printing and Plotting. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Spring only. (3)

DFDT 275. 3-D Drafting with AutoCAD. In depth development of 3-D images from 2-D drawings. A basic introduction to 3-D modeling will also be included. Will demonstrate the ability to present 3-D objects using a number of different shading and rendering techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Spring only. (3) DFDT 281. Internship in Drafting & Design. For advanced students who have completed the majority of the course curriculum in Drafting and Design. Will enable students to use skills acquired in real world applications within the community/workplace. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (3)

DFDT 285. Directed Study. Student initiated, independent study in drafting and design. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1-6)

Early Childhood Education and Family Support

ECED 100. Entry Level in Early Childhood Education (45 hours). An introduction to the field of early childhood education and family support. Developmentally appropriate expectations and practices and the New Mexico competency areas in early childhood education will provide the foundation for this course. (3)

ECED 101. Introduction to the Child Development Associates Credential.

Introduces the student to the CDA process as defined by the Child Development Associates Consortium. Individuals will receive advising and will develop a plan and time line for completion of the requirements leading to the CDA Certificate. (1)

ECED 102. CDA Portfolio Development. Assists the student in preparing a portfolio according to the guidelines and requirements defined by the Child Development Associates Consortium. CDA Advising and limited observation will be included in this course. (1)

ECED 103. CDA Assessment. Assists the student to prepare for CDA Assessment by providing advising and limited observation. Students will prepare all CDA materials into an organized professional portfolio and will prepare for the CDA Assessment visit. (1)

ECED 120. Professionalism. Provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics, and advocacy are introduced. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined. (NMCCN ECED 2152). (2)

ECED 125. Family and Community Collaboration I. Covers the current issues and trends affecting families, strategies for designing programs, and policies that welcome all families to the early care setting. Emphasis on building mutual partnerships with families is emphasized. (NMCCN ECED 1133). (3)

ECED 181. Internship in Early Childhood Education. (For declared ECED. Majors only) Supervised internship under the direction of WNMU faculty and site coordination in an approved setting. Students are required to have on file a criminal background check within the first 3 weeks of this course. (Information about criminal background checks may be found at La Familia, 505-538-6344). (3)

ECED 201. Curriculum Development and Implementation. Methods of implementing a developmentally appropriate curriculum in an early childhood setting with a focus on ages birth through age 8. Issues of inclusion, diversity, and responsive environments will be covered in this course. (3)

ECED 208. Guiding Young Children. Social emotional development of young children, self concept development, theories of guidance, issues of child and family stress and group management strategies are covered.Techniques for observing and recording child behavior are covered. (NMCCN ECED 2183). (3)

ECED 211. Health, Safety & Nutrition. Focuses on physical and mental health, safety, nutrition in the early childhood learning environments, and as these issues relate to curriculum for young children. Students will learn how environment design enhances safety, behavior, and learning. Procedures for responding to child abuse and neglect will be covered. (NMCCN ECED 2122). (2)

ECED 215. Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development. Provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. An integrated language arts perspective and an interdisciplinary approach as it addresses developing writing, reading, and oral language in the home and school contexts will be addressed. (3)

ECED 221. Designing Curriculum for Diversities in Early Childhood Ed. An introduction to issues, trends, and practices related to special needs, diversity, inclusion, culture, and language as it related to early care, education, and family support. This course will cover the early care and education professional’s responsibilities regarding the laws that have impacted practices in early care and education. (3)

ECED 225. Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs I. Considers principles and practices of administration and supervision. Introduces human resources management, maintenance of programs, regulations, policies, implementation, fiscal management, grant writing, interagency cooperation, community development, and advocacy. (NMCCN ECED 1143). (3)

ECED 231. Child Growth, Development and Learning. A survey of the major developmental theorists. The period from birth through age 8, and how developmental theory relates to early childhood practices is the emphasis, including developmentally appropriate expectations and practices as well as on-going reference to the New Mexico Competencies for the Early Childhood License. (NMCCN ECED 1113). (3)

ECED 232. Curriculum Development and Implementation I. Will address content that is relevant for children birth through age 8 as well as developmentally appropriate ways to integrate content into teaching and learning experiences for all children in an inclusive early childhood environment. Corequisite: ECED 281. (NMCCN ECED 2163). (3)

ECED 235. Field Experience. As the early childhood education AA student nears completion of the degree, the semester prior to graduation will provide the field experience placement. The student will be placed in WNMU’s Child Development Center or another approved program. The student will work as a member of the early childhood education team in a classroom/center setting. The student will be responsible for developing a portfolio demonstrating developing competence in the 7 areas of the New Mexico Early Childhood License. (6)

ECED 236. Curriculum Development and Implementation - Part II. Will address various curriculum models as well as teaching and learning strategies. Designing and implementing experiences and the environment in an early childhood setting will be an important criteria addressed in this course. Corequisite: ECED 282. (NMCCN ECED 2173). (3).

ECED 275. Confident Parenting. To enhance the skills and knowledge of parents and other child care givers. Topics for discussion will address the physical, social/ emotional, and cognitive development of the child. Issues will include such things as typical child development, positive guidance, communication, self-esteem, and the role of the parent in meeting children’s needs. (1)

ECED 281. Curriculum Development and Implementation Practicum - I.

Provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from Curriculum Development and Implementation - Part I. The student will develop skills in planning developmental appropriate learning experiences for young children from birth through age eight, including young children with special needs. Corequisite: ECED 232. (NMCCN ECED 2162). (2)

ECED 282. Curriculum Development and Implementation Practicum - II.

Provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from Curriculum Development and Implementation - Part II and develop skills in planning learning environments and implementing curriculum in programs serving young children, birth through age eight, including those with special needs. Corequisite: ECED

236. (NMCCN ECED 2172). (2)

ECED 315. Teaching Reading and Writing. Prepares early childhood professionals for teaching reading and writing in the early primary grades. The course focuses on reading as a complex, interactive, constructive process. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses: 1) the integration of theory and research with the practice of teaching children to read and write, including children with special needs, 2) the organization of effective reading and writing instruction, 3) the sociocultural contexts in which children learn to read and write, 4) culturally, linguistically and developmentally appropriate literacy curricula, and 5) assessment and evaluation. Builds upon indicators of competence established at the lower division (AA) level. Prerequisite: ECED 215. (3)

ECED 321. Family and Community Collaboration II. Prepares prospective teachers for working effectively as partners with family and community members to facilitate the development and learning of children birth through age 8, including children with special needs. It focuses on diverse family types that include various family structures, lifestyles, linguistic, cultural, and ethic groups. The complexity and dynamics of families as systems will be included, and community resources to support families will be identified. The course builds upon indicators of competence established at the lower division (AA) level. Prerequisite: ECED 125. (2)

ECED 325. Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs II. Builds upon student understanding of the connections among learning, teaching, assessment, and strategies for evaluating programs. Assessment, identification, and monitoring of typical and atypical development in the cognitive, motor, affective, and social domains will be explored. Multiple and diverse assessment approaches, including responsiveness to cultural and linguistic differences, will be emphasized. The course builds upon indicators of competence established at the lower division (AA) level. Prerequisite: ECED 225. (3)

ECED 331. Research in Child Growth and Development. This advanced course in child growth, development, and learning builds upon the foundational material covered in the basic course. An integration of major theories of child development is provided by focusing on contemporary research in all aspects of development, including bioecological, social-affective, congnitive-learning, language-cultural, and methodological aspects of research in early childhood development and education. This course focuses on preparing early childhood professionals to use empircally-based research to inform their teaching of young children. This advanced course builds upon indicators of competence at the lower division (AA) level. Prerequisite: ECED 231. (3)

ECED 381. Teaching Reading and Writing Practicum. Provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from the course Teaching of Reading and Writing. In kindergarten through 3rd classrooms, students will develop skills in organizing a literature rich environment, planning effective reading and writing instruction and assessment, and implementing culturally, linguistically, and developmentally appropriate literacy curricula. The course builds upon indicators of competence established at the lower division (AA) level. Prerequisite: EDEC 215. (1)

ECED 423. Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum. Focuses on developmentally appropriate content, learning environments, and curriculum implementation for children birth to age 5. It emphasizes integration of content areas (the arts, literacy, math, health, science, social studies, adaptive learning) and the development of rich learning environments for infants, toddlers, and preschool children. This course builds upon indicators of competence established at the lower division (AA) level. For each course objective (core competency), students will demonstrate the indicators of competence established for the bachelor's level. Prerequisite: ECED 232. (3)

ECED 472. Methods and Materials for the Early Primary Grades. Focuses on developmentally appropriate content, learning environments, and curriculum implementation for children in K-3rd grade. It emphasizes integration of content areas (the arts, literacy, math, health, science, and social studies) and the development of rich learning environments for the early primary grades. The course builds upon indicators of competence established at the lower division (AA) level. Prerequisite: ECED 282. Corequisite: ECED 482. (3)

ECED 481. Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum Practicum. Provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum and develop skills in planning and implementing developmentally appropriate learning experiences, integrated curriculum, and learning environments for children from birth to age 5. Curriculum will include all content areas: the arts, health/wellness, literacy, math, social studies, science, and adaptive living skills for children with special needs. The practicum experience will be divided equally between a classroom serving 0-3 and a classroom serving 3-5 year old children. Prerequisite: ECED 236. (2)

ECED 482. Methods and Materials for the Early Primary Grades Practicum.

Provides opportunities for students to develop, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate and integrated learning experiences for children in K-3rd grade. Students will gain experience creating learning environments that are developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive for children in the early primary grades. The practicum builds upon indicators of competence established at the lower division (AA) level. Prerequisite: ECED 236. (2)

ECED 491. Early Childhood Education Student Teaching. The student teaching experience in early childhood education includes placement and assigned tasks in an early childhood classroom with a mentor teacher and a weekly seminar to review and reflect on teaching practices, make connections between theory and practice, study topics of interest, conduct self-evaluation and contribute to group discussions. Prerequisite: ECED 482. (12)

Economics

ECON 200. Basic Economics: Private Enterprise. Basic economic concepts and principles of the private enterprise system from a non-technical view; includes current economic occurrences and problems as the examples for learning and applying the concepts. (3)

ECON 201. Principles of Macroeconomics. The theory of national income accounting and aggregate income determination in the American economy; monetary theory; functioning of financial institutions, monetary and fiscal policy; and international trade and payments. (NMCCN ECON 2113)(Area IV). (3)

ECON 202. Principles of Microeconomics. Theory of markets: supply and demand, consumption and production, competition and monopoly, resources, equity, and efficiency. (NMCCN ECON 2123)(Area IV). (3)

ECON 350. Labor Economics. The American labor movement, wage, theory, labor market demand, and labor supply. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202. (3)

ECON 360. Intermediate Microeconomics. Analysis of supply and demand in competitive markets, theoretical foundation of demand theory, production and cost theory as related to short and long run supply, market structure, and resource markets. Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202 and MATH 121. (3)

ECON 370. Applied Business Economics. This course reinforces critical thinking skills by developing and applying micro and macroeconomic theory and empirical methods to real problems faced by private and public sector organizations. Writing Intensive Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202. Spring only. (3)

ECON 400. Women and the World of Work. A study of the increased economic, political, and social involvement of women in the work world; investigates the place and acceptance of women in our social system today and the evolutionary processes of the past, present, and future. Spring only. (3)

ECON 403. Public Finance. A study of government expenditures, principles of taxation, government borrowing and indebtedness, and federal, state and local interrelationships. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202. (3)

ECON 407. History of Economic Thought. An analysis of economic thought from the mercantilists to the present; the materials selected are evaluated both as reflections of their times and as contributions to contemporary thought. Writing Intensive (3)

ECON 410. Government and Business. A study of the growing importance of governmental activities in our economic life; special attention will be given to trends in legislation and court decisions. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202. (3)

ECON 420. International Economics. Theory of international trade and policy, tariffs and quotas, balance of payments, exchange rates, foreign investments, trade related monetary and fiscal policies and ethical issues. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202. (3)

ECON 425. Money and Banking. Study of financial markets and institutions, theories of interest and asset demand, money supply and the Federal Reserve System, monetary theory and policy. Recommended Prerequisite: ECON 201. (3)

ECON/HIST 430. Mid East: Past, Present & Future. Introduces the student to the historical review of the major countries of the Mid East as a background for understanding of the major political and cultural problems of these countries in the present. At the end of the course the student will be literate in the political, cultural, military, social and economic problems of the major Mid East countries and will have a good understanding of their historical roots. Writing Intensive Prerequisites: six hours of course work in economics or history. Summer only. (3)

Education

EDUC 311. Foundations of Education. Historical, sociological, philosophical, and legal aspects of the elementary and secondary schools in American culture; includes multilevel multidisciplined field experience. Writing Intensive. (4)

EDUC 402. Computers in the Classroom. The use of microcomputers and other technologies in the school curriculum as an instructional tool; prepares elementary and secondary teachers for making decisions about purchasing microcomputer software and hardware systems; incorporates a culturally responsive integrated program. Prerequisite: CMPS 110, 111 or 140. EDUC 311 may be taken concurrently. (3)

EDUC 404. Kindergarten/Primary Methods. This course deals with the curriculum of early childhood, using methods and materials based on current theories of early childhood learning; emphasizes the learning needs of the child of the Southwest. Prerequisites: EDUC 311, and Admission to Teacher Education Program. (3)

EDUC 414. Elementary Instructional Planning & Assessment. Provides theory and practical aspects of instructional planning and assessment for elementary teachers. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program. (2)

EDUC 423. Early Childhood Education. Theory and research on the development of children, early learning, current practices of early childhood education, innovative programs, and trends will be addressed. Requires laboratory work (see EDUC 425). Prerequisites: EDUC 311 and admission to Teacher Education Program. (3)

EDUC 425. Early Childhood Education Laboratory Experience. This required lab experience is to be taken concurrently with EDUC 423 and is a structural observation of young children in a variety of educational environments relating educational and child development theories studied in reading/discussions in EDUC 423; lab consists of 30 hours of field experience, averaging 2 hours per week and is individually arranged. Corequisite: EDUC 423. (1)

EDUC 436. Classroom Management. This course focuses on preparing prospective teachers to manage their classroom. Through instructor facilitation and group discussion, preventative and curative methods in classroom management will be

taught, and utilized in the concurrent practice teaching experience (EDUC 492, 493, or 494). Permission required. All core/professional courses must be taken prior to Classroom Management. Prerequisites: EDUC 311 and EDUC 471 or 473. (3)

EDUC 471. Secondary Curriculum and Instruction. Examination of historical backgrounds of curricular trends and the significance of curricular design. Provides practical experience in designing curricula that meet community needs and state mandates; includes 30 hours field experience in teaching field. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: EDUC 311 and admission to Teacher Education Program. (3)

EDUC 472. Elementary Methods and Curriculum I. Focuses on examination of elementary school curriculum and methods for social studies, language arts, fine arts, and career readiness. Provides experience in designing curricula to meet NM Standards and Benchmarks and community needs. Includes 15 hours field experience. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: EDUC 414 (3)

EDUC 473. Elementary Methods and Curriculum II. Focuses on examination of elementary school curriculum and methods for Mathematics, Science, Health, and PE. Provides experience in designing curricula to meet NM Standards and Benchmarks and community needs. Includes 15 hours field experience. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: EDUC 414 (3)

EDUC 474. Classroom Assessment. Prepares teachers to assess student classroom performance from a curriculum/instruction perspective, including informal evaluations, teacher-made tests, authentic and portfolio assessments, and nationally normed and standardized tests. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: EDUC 311 and EDUC 471. (2)

EDUC 480. Education Workshop. Programs in current educational theory and practice for school personnel in elementary or secondary education. Permission required. (1-3)

EDUC 492. Practice Teaching - Elementary. One semester (17 weeks) of supervised classroom experience as an intern teacher in a public elementary school; involves a full time assignment with licensed educational personnel supervision. Attendance of a seminar is also a course requirement. Seminars will emphasize teaching methods, behavioral management, ethics, multiculturalism, and tutoring/coaching. Micro-teaching exercises will be used to enhance teaching skills. Writing Intensive.

Permission required. To be taken concurrently with EDUC 436. All other core/ professional courses must be taken prior to Practice Teaching. (2-9)

EDUC 493. Practice Teaching - (K-12). One semester (17 weeks) of supervised classroom experience as an intern teacher in a public elementary school; involves a full time assignment with licensed educational personnel supervision. Attendance of a seminar is also a course requirement. Seminars will emphasize teaching methods, ethics, multiculturalism, and tutoring/coaching. Micro-teaching exercises will be used to enhance teaching skills. Writing Intensive. Permission required. To be taken concurrently with EDUC 436. All core/professional courses must be taken prior to Practice Teaching. (2-9)

EDUC 494. Practice Teaching - Secondary. One semester (17 weeks) of supervised classroom experience as a practice teacher in a public secondary school; involves a full time assignment with licensed educational personnel supervision. Attendance of a seminar is also a course requirement. Seminars will emphasize

teaching methods, ethics, multiculturalism, and tutoring/coaching. Permission required. To be taken concurrently with EDUC 436. All core/professional courses must be taken prior to Practice Teaching. (2-9)

Electrical Technology

ELT 121. Basic Electrical Construction Math. Basic addition to multiplying fractions to the electrical trade made in NCCER curriculum. Course covers whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, square roots, algebraic operations, basic equations, graphing, vectors, units, dimensions, significant figures, and use of electrical calculator. Prerequisites: knowledge of basic algebra and permission of the instructor. (3)

ELT 123. Basic Electrical Tools and Safety. Introduction to hand tools, power tools, basic rigging tools, electrical safety, maintenance instructions, and safety tips. (3)

ELT 124. Introduction to NEC Safety and Plans. Introduction to basic general job safety to include respiratory, personal protective equipment, and construction task safety. Introduction to floor and site plans. Use of current codebook. (3)

ELT 125. Electrical Theory, Blueprints and Conductors. Introduction to theory I & II series, parallel circuits calculations, and electrical blueprints. Applications of conductors and proper wiring techniques. Prerequisite: ELT 121. (3)

ELT 126. Electrical Application and Wiring Methods. Applying code tech to commercial or residential wiring and incorporating the use of raceways and fasteners. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: ELT 124. (4)

ELT 127. Introduction to A/C Current, Motor Theory, NEC Application.

Alternating current and its applications. Ohm’s Law and A/C and D/C motor and

code application. Prerequisites: ELT 121 and ELT 125. (3) ELT 128. Basic Bending, Cable Tray and Construction Installation. Introduction to conduit bending up to 2 inches. Introduction to cable tray and conductor installation. Lecture with lab. (4)

ELT 129. Basic Conductor Termination and Grounding. Applications of grounding

including boxes and fittings, conductor terminations, contractors, and relays. (3) ELT 130. Electrical Service Installation. Methods of service installation, circuit breakers/fuses and principles of installation of electrical lighting. Lecture with lab. Prerequisites: ELT 121, 123, 124, 125, 128, and 129. (4)

ELT 230. Welding Machines. Basic operations of welding machines including

types of electrical welding. Lecture with lab. (4) ELT 235. Conductor Load Calculations and Overcurrent Protection. Calculations of branch circuits including conductor insulation and circuit breakers. Prerequisites: All ELT 100-199 courses or permission of the instructor. (3)

ELT 236. Distribution, Systems, Raceways, and Ballasts. Introduction to transformer types, distributor equipment, specific lamps and ballasts and raceways. Prerequisites: All ELT 100-199 courses or permission of the instructor. (3)

ELT 237. Motor Operation and Controls. Motor calculations, maintenance, troubleshooting, and motor control operations. Lecture with lab. Prerequisites: All ELT 100-199 courses or permission of the instructor. (4) ELT 239. Electronic Theory and Wiring Methods. Basic electronic theory, hazardous locations, and wiring devices. Prerequisites: All ELT 100-199 courses or permission of the instructor. (3)

ELT 241. Commercial and Residential Load Calculations. Basic calculation procedures, fire alarm control units, calculating specialty transformers to include current transformers, and shield transformers. Prerequisites: All ELT 100-199 courses or permission of the instructor. (3)

ELT 242. Advanced Motor Controls and Lighting. Operating principles of solid state controls, HVAC systems, and lighting systems. Prerequisites: All ELT 100199 courses or permission of the instructor. (3)

ELT 243. Introduction to Emergency Systems and High Voltage Applications.

Overview of code requirements for higher voltage terminations, heat tracing, motor maintenance, and emergency systems. Prerequisites: All ELT 100-199 courses or permission of the instructor. (3)

English Language and Composition

ENGL 101. Composition and Rhetoric I. Extensive practice in the skills involved in clear and effective writing. Placement according to ACT score, COMPASS, or successful completion of DVSW 102. (Developmental Writing II) and placement according to COMPASS reading score or successful completion of DVSR 102 (Developmental Reading II). All students will take an exit exam, which will be scored pass/fail by English faculty. Failure of the exam will lower the course grade one grade. (NMCCN ENGL 1113)(Area I). (3)

ENGL 102. Composition and Rhetoric II. Continuation of English 101; deals with longer papers, research; may include a brief introduction to literature. . All students will take an exit exam, which will be scored pass/fail by English faculty. Failure of the exam will lower the course grade one grade. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 with a grade of C or better. (NMCCN ENGL 1123)(Area I). (3)

ENGL 200. Poetry. An intensive study of American and British poetry and poetics designed to acquaint students with the essential components of poetic composition and to develop the analytical and interpretive skills necessary for the fullest appreciation of poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN 2313)(Area V).(3)

ENGL 201. Introduction to Literature. Introduction to the basic concepts and vocabulary of literary analysis for consideration of poetry, fiction, and drama; emphasizes the writing of effective critical essays. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2213)(Area V)(3)

ENGL 205. Hispanic American Literature. A survey of the literature of United States citizens of Hispanic descent, with particular focus on the Mexican American, Cuban American and Puerto Rican. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2723)(Area V). (3)

ENGL 225. The Short Story. A detailed study of short stories. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2343)(Area V).(3)

ENGL 240. Native American Literature. Exploration and analysis of selected texts by Native American writers incorporating fundamentals of history, art, and music with a focus on cultures of indigenous peoples of North America. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2733)(Area V). (3)

ENGL 265. World Literature. Exploration of literatures outside the American and British traditions with focuses on diversity, multicultural approaches, and critical thinking, encouraging comparisons and connections within the framework of the global perspective. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2613)(Area V). (3)

ENGL 293. English Literature I. A survey of English literature from its beginnings through the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2413)(Area V). (3)

ENGL 294. English Literature II. A survey of English literature from the beginning of the Romantic period to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2423)(Area V). (3)

ENGL 296. American Literature I. Major American writers before the Civil War. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2513)(Area V).(3)

ENGL 297. American Literature II. Major American writers since the Civil War. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2523)(Area V). (3)

ENGL 300. Heroic Myth and Legend. A study of the nature and function of myth and its expression through the literature, legend, and folklore of particular cultural traditions. Examines the heroic code, legendary heroes and heroines, gods and goddesses, and mythic archetypes. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 304. History of the English Language. The structural essentials of the English language, with attention given to the historical development from Old English to Modern English, and to grammar, vocabulary, and style. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 305. Drama as Literature. A detailed study of plays from the eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 316.Traditional Grammar and Usage. Intensive grammar study designed primarily for the English major or minor; required for students seeking New Mexico teacher licensure in English. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 and Junior or Senior standing. (3)

ENGL 320. Creative Writing. Practice in original composition for students who have shown creative ability; requires a strong background in mechanics of English composition. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 325. American Life and Thought. A search for keys to understanding the American character and the uniqueness of the American experience as reflected by dramatists, novelists, poets, essayists, and short-story writers through readings in primary literary sources and secondary social, intellectual, and political commentaries. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 353. The Novel. Readings in a broad range of novels from the eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (NMCCN ENGL 2323).(3)

ENGL 404. Early English and European Literature. Offers a historical survey of English and European literature from the Middle Ages through the early Renaissance. Emphasizes the significant cultural changes marking the transition from Medieval to Renaissance life, as well as the important differences between English and continental writers. Authors to be studied may include (but need not be limited to) Chaucer, Dante, Boccaccio, Marie de France, Margery Kemp, and Julian of Norwich. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 410. Advanced Creative Writing. Advanced practice in original composition with a focus on research and publication within a chosen genre; demands a sophisticated understanding of the English language, an application of critical thought, and a commitment to creativity. Prerequisite: ENGL 320. (3)

ENGL 415. Life and Literature of New Mexico. A study of the fiction, travel, memoirs, and folklore of New Mexico with an emphasis on those writings which reflect the cultural heritage and literary accomplishments of the area. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 418. Studies in English Literature. Advanced study in a particular period, author, theme, or genre in English literature; serves as an in-depth follow-up to the most recently offered English literature survey course. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 419. Advanced Composition. Intensive work in expository writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 420. Studies in American Literature. Advanced study in a particular period, author, theme, or genre in American literature; serves as an in-depth follow-up to the most recently offered American literature survey course. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 438. Women as Writers. Examination of selected writings by English and American women from the sixteenth to twentieth centuries, with special consideration given to the ways in which women portray women’s experience, image, self-concept, and role in society. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 440. Shakespeare. Study of the major plays, including representative tragedies, comedies, and histories, with emphasis on language and theme. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 442.The Enlightenment. Acquaints the student with the significant changes in ideas and values which swept Europe and the Americas in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 450. Secondary English Methods. Techniques and texts appropriate to the high school classroom. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. Offered every third semester. (3)

ENGL 451. Literature of the American West. A survey of the literature of the West, with emphasis upon historical narratives, folk literature, nature writing, and fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

ENGL 465. Critical Approaches to Literature. An intensive study of literatures through the application of various insights and knowledges from other fields that can reveal more about the literatures as well as more about the students exploring the literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 201. (3)

ENGL. 470. Feminist Theories of Literature. Highlights women’s issues and women’s literature, and investigates theoretical approaches to all literature, building on students’ understanding of the literary canon, women’s social and historical issues, and literary theory, with emphasis on extensive research and writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 201. (3)

Financial Services

FNSV 101. Business Ethics I. Introduction to ethical behavior with an emphasis on communication and customer service skills and a background to important elemental ethical matters including interviewing skills, grooming and hygiene, time management, and other business responsibilities. (3)

FNSV 102. Business Ethics II. Continuation of Business Ethics I. Strengthens concepts of ethical behavior in the workplace with emphasis on conflict management, motivation, employee handbooks, policy and procedures, and teamwork. Prerequisite: FNSV 101. (2)

FNSV 103. Personal Finance. Course instruction deals with financial planning, career planning, tax planning, financial recordkeeping, budgeting, banking services, and consumer credit. (3)

FNSV 105. Services Marketing. Will give students an overview of the marketing strategy in order to understand the role of marketing in the service industry, with an emphasis on the target customer, advertising and sales, new product development, and customer buying behavior. (3)

FNSV 107. Service Industry Accounting and Bookkeeping. This course gives an overview to accounting systems, with an emphasis on financial statements and records management. (3)

FNSV 110. Basic Office Suite. Gives students a working knowledge of basic office technology with an emphasis in Microsoft Word, Excel spreadsheets, and Microsoft Access. (3)

FNSV 201. Business Ethics III. Continuation of Business Ethics I and II. This course introduces students to the legal aspects of the workplace. Focus is on labor laws and standards plus the importance of organizational goals and objectives. Prerequisites: FNSV 101, 102. (2)

FNSV 203. Money Value. Traces the history of money from the beginning to the use of paper money, the money cycle and flow, the Federal Reserve System, economic cycle, and the value of money. Prerequisite: ECON 200. (3)

FNSV 205. Sales. Gives students the fundamentals for selling service products. Emphasis is given to identifying sales opportunities, asking for the sale, handling objections, and following through to cross-selling other products. Prerequisite: FNSV 105. (3)

FNSV 209. Principles of Investments. Provides an overview of investment options including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, retirement plans, and various insurance investments. Focus is also given to ethical decisions based on consumer needs. Prerequisite: BSAD 230. (3)

Geography

GEOG 201/211. Physical Geography & lab. Contemporary physical geography, including concepts needed to understand our physical environment. Laboratory must be taken concurrently with lecture section. Spring only. (NMCCN GEOG 1113/1111)(Area Ill). (4)

GEOG 202. Human Geography. An introduction to the ways in which geographers approach their studies using case studies and hands-on applications. Basic geographic concepts, problem solving, and analytical techniques are emphasized. Fall only. Writing Intensive. (NMCCN GEOG 1213)(Area IV) (3)

GEOG 205. World Regional Geography. An introduction to geography as a synthesizing field of study. The goal of this class is to increase understanding of regions of the world by examining the characteristics of places, discovering the relationships among humans and their environments, and explaining patterns of location and spatial interaction. Spring only. Writing Intensive. (3)

GEOG/HIST/POLS/PSY/SOC 297. Logic & Methods in the Social Sciences. An introduction to the logic and methods used in the social sciences with an emphasis on exposure to the components of research and scholarly literature. Prerequisite: ANTH 201, GEOG 202, HIST 111, POLS 201, PSY 102, SOC 101, or SOC 102. (1)

GEOG/SOC 300. Older Women’s Issues. An interdisciplinary examination of the social, economic, and health issues facing older women in the United States. (3)

GEOG/SOC 323. Social Statistics. An introduction to the application of statistical techniques for social sciences; use of computers to aid in statistical problem-solving. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: GEOG 202, PSY 102 or SOC 101, and MATH 111. Fall only. (3)

GEOG 340. Geography of Latin America. An examination of Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America from a geographic point of view; special focus on issues of population growth and economic development. (3)

GEOG/SOC 342. Social Geography. Social relationships are rooted in places and spaces that, in turn, profoundly influence how people interact with one another. This course explores the unavoidable linkages between social relationships and geography through the examination of such issues as class, race, gender, ethnicity, and age. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: successful completion of at least one other course in GEOG or SOC. (3)

GEOG 382. Urban Geography. Examination of urban systems and the internal structure of cities with emphasis on the North American city. (3)

GEOG/SOC 400. Population Analysis. Study of population size, composition, and distribution as well as basic concepts and techniques used to analyze populations; involves data manipulation, analysis, and case studies from around the world. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: GEOG 202 or SOC 101. Offered Alternate Springs. (3)

GEOG 401. Human-Environmental Interactions. Interactions between human beings and the planet on which we live from a variety of perspectives with a focus on current environmental problems. Prerequisite: GEOG 201/211 or permission of the instructor. (3)

GEOG 403. Economic Geography. A study of the spatial distribution of economic systems. Prerequisite: GEOG 202 or permission of the instructor. (3)

GEOG 496. Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences. The Senior Seminar is designed as a capstone experience for majors and/or minors in the Social Sciences. It brings together critical thinking, research and communication skills in an interdisciplinary context. A major research project is an important component of this course. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: declared major or minor in one of the Social Science disciplines, Junior or Senior status and must have completed at least 21 hours (for majors) or 15 hours (for minors). (3)

Geology

GEOL 101/103. General Geology I & lab. Physical geology; study of Earth materials and processes and their effects on mankind; laboratory periods frequently used for field trips; three lectures and one laboratory per week. GEOL 101 recommended before 102. (NMCCN GEOL 1113/1111)(Area III). (4)

GEOL 102/104. General Geology II & lab. Historical geology; study of historical development of the Earth and its life forms; laboratory periods frequently used for field trips; three lectures and one laboratory per week. GEOL 101 recommended before 102. (NMCCN GEOL 1213/1211)(Area III). (4)

GEOL 201/203. Environmental Science & lab. Application of physical and biological principles to understanding the environment and environmental issues. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. (NMCCN ENVS 1113/1111)(Area III). (4)

GEOL 301/303. Rocks and Minerals & lab. Origin, occurrence, and physical properties of common minerals and rocks; introduction to crystallography and mineralogy; identification of common rocks and minerals in the laboratory and field; three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: GEOL 101/103 or equivalent. (4)

GEOL 305/307. Introduction to Weather & lab. Introduction to properties of the atmosphere, interactions between the atmosphere and other Earth systems, and the principles that control weather and climate. (4)

GEOL 311/313. Natural Resources & lab. The characteristics and origins of mineral and energy resources. Techniques of exploration, extraction, and reclamation. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: GEOL 101/103 or equivalent. (4)

GEOL 315. Geology of New Mexico. The rock types, structures, and tectonic

history of New Mexico; one three-hour lecture per week. (3) GEOL 331/333. Sedimentology & lab. Sediments and sedimentary rocks; their properties, classification, and origin. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: GEOL 102/104 or equivalent. (4)

GEOL 340/342. Field and Research Methods & lab. Understanding and creating geologic maps and cross-sections. Introduction to tools and techniques of field mapping. Development of a research proposal. Presenting field data and communication results. Lectures and field work. Prerequisite: GEOL 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years. (4)

GEOL 401/403. Hydrogeology & lab. The hydrologic cycle. Principles of surface and ground water flow.Water quality and resource management.Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: MATH 131 and GEOL 101/103 or CHEM 151/153. (4)

GEOL 450. Inquiry Methods in Science. Inquiry methods in science education including theory and rationale. Development and implementation of inquiry activities and assessment of activities. Prerequisite: 3 science courses or permission of the instructor. (3)

GEOL 480/580. Geology Workshop for Teachers. A workshop designed to increase understanding of and familiarity with geological materials, phenomena, theories, and techniques of interpretation through a combination of lectures, slides, hands-on exercises, and field trips. (3-4)

History

HIST 111. World Civilization I. A survey of the history of world civilizations from

ancient times to 1600. (NMCCN HIST 1053)(Area V). Writing Intensive. (3) HIST 112. World Civilization II. A survey of the history of world civilizations from 1600 to the present. (NMCCN HIST 1063)(Area V). (3)

HIST 201. American History I. A history of the United States from the colonial

period through the Civil War. (NMCCN HIST 1113)(Area V). (3) HIST 202. American History II. A history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. (NMCCN HIST 1123)(Area V). (3)

HIST 208. African American History. Political, socio-economic study of the devel

opment of African American history in the growth of the nation. (3) HIST 221. History of the American Indian. The American Indian from the historian’s point of view; covers most of the North American Indian tribes; emphasizes Indians of the American Southwest. (3)

HIST/GEOG/POLS/PSY/SOC 297. Logic & Methods in the Social Sciences. An introduction to the logic and methods used in the social sciences with an emphasis on exposure to the components of research and scholarly literature. Prerequisite: ANTH 201, GEOG 202, HIST 111, POLS 201, PSY 102, SOC 101, or SOC 102. (1)

HIST 300. History of New Mexico. Covers the time span from Cabeza de Vaca through statehood; includes the Spanish period, the Mexican period, and the territorial phase under the United States. (NMCCN HIST 2113). (3)

HIST 303. Survey of Far-Eastern History. A survey of the diplomatic history of China, Japan, and other Far-Eastern nations and their present foreign policy with regard to relations with the United States from 1800 to present. (3)

HIST/POLS 310. History and Politics of Colonial Mexico. Major focus is upon Mexico’s Indian past; the discovery, conquest, and colonization of New Spain; the emergence and role of the Catholic Church and the Independence Movements. (3)

HIST/POLS 311. History and Politics of Modern Mexico. An interpretive and analytical review of the History and Politics of Mexico from the Advent of the Mexican Revolution of 1910-20 to contemporary times. Inter Alia, we shall focus upon the outbreak of the Revolution; the chaotic Civil War among the revolutionary elements; the success of the insurgency; consolidation; and the contemporary political conditions in Mexico. Writing Intensive. (3)

HIST 312. Contemporary American History. The United States since World War I, including its relations with the major countries of the world. Prerequisite: HIST 202 or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 315. Contemporary European History. Europe since World War I, including the major developments within the leading states, their relations with one another and with the world in general. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: HIST 112 or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 340. The American Revolution. The American Revolution, its background causes, and its progress to 1783. (3)

HIST 347. Latin-American History and Politics: Colonial Period. Survey of Latin-American history and politics from the pre-Columbian period through the Wars of Independence. (3)

HIST 348. Latin-American History and Politics: Modern Period. Survey of the history and politics of the Latin-American republics from independence to the present. (3)

HIST 350. History of America’s National Parks. A history of the National Park system from its founding through the present. This course will include the study of selected National Parks, Monuments, Seashores, and Historical Parks; administration and management of the system; and modern challenges to the Parks. Prerequisites: HIST 201 or 202 and ENGL 101 and 102. (3)

HIST 365. Nazi Germany and Holocaust. The purpose of this course is to explore through films, readings, and individuals the history of National Socialism and the systematic killing of people –The Holocaust. (3)

HIST 400. Colonial American History. History of Colonial North America. Prerequisite: six hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 405. Seminar in Modern European History. History of a recognized period of European history falling between 1789 and the present, following regular seminar techniques. This course provides an in-depth examination of events and trends in the two most recent centuries of European history, beginning with outbreak of the French Revolution and fall of the Old Regime and provides students with an opportunity for advanced research on individual topics in modern European history, including its political, economic, social, and cultural aspects. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST/POLS 406. American Political Thought. The origin and evolution of American political ideas from the early colonies to the present. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 407. History and Historians. A study of historical writings from ancient times to the present with in-depth readings in the works of specific historians and social scientists. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: 9 hours of history. (3)

HIST 408. Introduction to Museum Work. A study of the theory and techniques involved in the administration of history museums, includes practical hands-on experience in exhibit preparation and interpretation. Prerequisite: 6 hours history, sciences, education, or art in any combination. (3)

HIST 409. Seminar in Local History. Research opportunities and writing experience in studying topics of local history. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 414. History of the Southwest. Westward expansion and frontier movements in the Southwest under Spain, Mexico and the United States. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 421. The Contemporary North American Indian. Some of the major problems confronting the American Indian today, including significant historical, anthropological, and sociological issues leading up to them; exploration and discussion of possible solutions to these problems; includes a study of acculturation and the present status of North American Indian society. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 422. Indians of the Southwest. An analysis and comparison of aboriginal cultures of the southwest region of North America, including coastal tribes; emphasis on New Mexico. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST/ECON 430. Mid East: Past, Present & Future. To introduce the student to the historical review of the major countries of the Mid East as a background for understanding of the major political and cultural problems of these countries in the present. At the end of the course the student will be literate in the political, cultural, military, social, economic problems of the major Mid East countries, and will have a good understanding of their historical roots. Prerequisite: 6 hours of course work in economics or history. Summer only. (3)

HIST 435. The Civil War and Reconstruction. An in-depth analysis of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras considering the political, economic and social currents. Prerequisite: HIST 201 or permission of the instructor. (3).

HIST 441. Ancient Civilizations. A study of the civilizations of the ancient Near East and Mediterranean area from the earliest beginnings in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Anatolia, and Crete through Greece and the Roman Empire. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 442. Medieval Civilizations. A study of the civilizations of the Mediterranean and Western Europe from the decline of Rome to A.D. 1500. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 443. Early Modern Europe, 1350-1750. An examination of the history of Europe from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, concentrating on the political, social, religious, and intellectual developments of the period. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: HIST 112 or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 450. Secondary Teaching Methods. Methodology for secondary teachers of social studies. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 451.The West in American History. A study of the westward movement and its influence upon national development from colonial times to 1900. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 456. Social/Intellectual History to 1865. The history and influence of such institutions and issues as religion, slavery, immigration, war, and peace with reference to appropriate literature. Prerequisite: HIST 201 or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 457. Social/Intellectual History Since 1865. The history and influence of such institutions and issues as ``Reconstruction,’’ industrialism and the ``new immigration;’’ the impact of World War I and World War II on current thought; the impact of labor and the military industrial complex; references to appropriate literature. Prerequisite: HIST 202 or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 462. Modern Britain. A study of the history of Great Britain from the defeat of Napoleon to the present, tracing its political, economic, and social developments. Prerequisite: HIST 112 or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 475. World War I. A study of the causes, course, outcome of the First World War, concentrating on the social, political, economic, and technological aspects

of the war a well as the military. Prerequisite: HIST 112 or permission of the instructor. (3)

HIST 476. World War II. A study of the origins, course, and consequences of the Second World War, both in European and Pacific theaters of operation. The course will examine the social, political, economic, and technological aspects of the war as well as the military. Prerequisites: HIST 112 or permission of instructor. (3)

HIST 485. Directed Study. In History. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (1-3)

HIST 495. Tutorial Reading. In History. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (1-3)

HIST 496. Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences. The Senior Seminar is designed as a capstone experience for majors and/or minors in the Social Sciences. It brings together critical thinking, research, and communication skills in an interdisciplinary context. A major research project is an important component of this course. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: declared major or minor in one of the Social Science disciplines, Junior or Senior status and must have completed at least 21 hours (for majors) or 15 hours (for minors). (3)

HIST/POLS 497. History and Politics of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. A review of the U. S. Civil Rights Movement, from its cautious inception during the 1930s, through the bold and turbulent years from 1955 to 1975. Emphases will be placed upon the early precursors, as well as the more prominent contemporary leaders; the different tactics and strategies employed; the nature and methods of the resistance; the slow but steady support from the U.S. government; major successes and failures of the Movement; and projections for the future of Civil rights in American. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (4)

HIST/POLS 498. History and Politics of the Vietnam War. A historical review and analysis of the mergence of a Vietnamese Nation and its eventual colonization by the French. Members will address the “First” Vietnam War (against the French), following by the achievement of independence and unification after the eventual withdrawal of the American military (the “Second” Vietnam War). Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (4)

Mathematics

MATH 105. Mathematics for the Liberal Arts I. The concepts of mathematics for students outside of the fields of mathematics, business, and the sciences. Placement according to COMPASS math score or successful completion of DVSM 102 (Developmental Algebra). (3)

MATH 106. Mathematics for the Liberal Arts II. The concepts of mathematics for students outside of the fields of mathematics, business, and the sciences. Placement according to COMPASS math score or successful completion of DVSM 102 (Developmental Algebra). (3)

MATH 111. Intermediate Algebra. Basic Algebra for the student of algebra whose background needs strengthening. Placement according to COMPASS math score or successful completion of DVSM 102 (Developmental Algebra). (3)

MATH 112. Music, Rhythm, and Mathematics. A study of harmonious connections between mathematics and music. This course explores how mathematics can be used to quantify concepts in music such as beat, the tone, as well as studying connections between geometry and musical composition. (3)

MATH 121. Mathematics for Business Applications I. Mathematical applications in business, including linear models, linear programming, non-linear models, and mathematics of finance. Prerequisite: Math 111 or equivalent. (3)

MATH 125. Mathematics for Health Occupations. Students from the health care programs (particularly nursing students at this time) will benefit from the use of mathematics concepts applied to situations in the health care field, drug dosage calculations as an example. Also the vocabulary and nomenclature used will be appropriate to the health care field. (3)

MATH 131. College Algebra. Essential concepts of algebra and algebraic functions that are needed for further study in mathematics. Uses appropriate technology such as a graphing calculator. Prerequisite: 2 years of high school algebra, or MATH 111, or permission of the dept. chair. (NMCCN MATH 1113)(Area II). (3)

MATH 132. Trigonometry. Essential concepts and skills of trigonometry and other non-algebraic functions are needed for further study of mathematics. Uses appropriate technology such as a graphing calculator. Prerequisite: 3 years of high school mathematics, or MATH 131, or permission of the dept. chair. (NMCCN MATH 1213). (3)

MATH 171. Calculus I. Review of functions and their multiple representations. Development of the fundamental concepts of calculus using graphical, numerical, and analytic methods for functions of a single variable; covers limit processes, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications. Uses appropriate technology such as a graphing calculator and/or computer algebra system. Prerequisite: 3 years of high school mathematics, MATH 131 and MATH 132, or permission of the dept. chair. (NMCCN MATH 1615)(Area II). (5)

MATH 172. Calculus II. Continuation of MATH 171; covers more techniques of integration including numerical techniques, applications of the definite integral, improper integrals, an introduction to differential equations, Taylor polynomials and series. Uses appropriate technology such as a graphing calculator and/or computer algebra system. Prerequisite: MATH 171. (NMCCN MATH 1624)(Area II). (4)

MATH 210. Foundations of Mathematical Thinking. Introduction to logic, methods of proof, and mathematical structures, with applications to set theory, relations, functions and analytic geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 171. (3)

MATH 221. Mathematics for Business Applications II. Calculus with applications in business, including derivatives, indefinite and definite integrals and functions of two or more variables. Prerequisite: MATH 121 or MATH 131. (3)

MATH 243. Discrete Mathematics. Introduction to logic, proofs, algorithms, recurrence relations, graph theory, and trees with applications to computer science. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or equivalent. (3)

MATH 271. Calculus III. A numerical, graphical, and analytic approach to multivariable calculus; covers representations, differentiation and integration of scalar functions of two and three variables, vectors, optimization, parametric curves , and surfaces. Uses appropriate technology such as a graphing calculator and/or computer algebra system. Prerequisite: MATH 172. (NMCCN MTH 2614). (4)

MATH 301. Understanding Elementary Mathematics I. The study of the arithmetic of real numbers, measurement, geometry, and problem solving. This course does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the University’s proficiency requirements for mathematics. (3)

MATH 302. Understanding Elementary Mathematics II. Continuation of the study of graphs, probability, statistics, logic, and problem solving. This course does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 301. (3)

MATH 304. Mathematics for the Secondary Teacher. Various approaches to the teaching of mathematics for preparation to teach secondary school mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 171. (3)

MATH 312. Computational Linear Algebra. Beginning linear algebra with a relatively concrete approach; covers computational matrix algebra, vectors, linear independence, bases, linear transformations, characteristic roots, and characteristic vectors; applications to solving systems of difference equations. Uses appropriate technology such as MATLAB and/or a computer algebra system. Prerequisite: MATH 172. (3)

MATH 321. Statistics. Analysis and collections of data; measures of central tendency; measures of variability; standard error; standard scores; correlation predictive indices; measures of reliability; practical applications in mathematics, science, business, education, and social sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 111, or equivalent. (NMCCN MATH 2113). (3)

MATH 323. Differential Equations. Analytical, numerical and graphical methods of solving ordinary differential equations; covers single equations and systems of equations with applications to various fields of science emphasizing a modeling approach. Uses appropriate technology such as MacMath and/or a computer algebra system. Prerequisites: MATH 271 and 312. (NMCCN MATH 2814). (3)

MATH 327. Survey of Geometry. Euclidean geometry, geometry of dimensions, and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 171. (3)

MATH 410. Abstract Mathematics. An introduction to group theory, real analysis, and topology. Prerequisite: MATH 210 or 243. (3)

MATH 417. Introduction to Numerical Analysis. Solutions of linear equations; solutions of equations, both algebraic and transcendental; systems of linear equations, interpolation by difference method. Prerequisite: MATH 172. (3)

MATH 421. Advanced Applied Statistics. An application of statistics in Estimation and Hypothesis Testing in two sample problems, Chi-square distributions, Analysis of Frequencies Contingency Tables, Analysis of Variance Multiple Comparisons, Data Transformations, Nested Analysis of Variance, Simple and Multiple Regression Analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 321. (3)

MATH 423. Introductory Complex Analysis. An introduction to functions of a complex variable; the complex number system and its properties, analytic functions, elementary function, power functions, integrals, conformal mapping, and applications of these topics. Prerequisite: MATH 271. (3)

MATH 431. Mathematical Modeling. Introduction to mathematical modeling; covers continuous, discrete, and probabilistic models along with dimensional analysis and sensitivity analysis. Uses appropriate technology such as a graphing calculator and/ or computer algebra system. Prerequisites: MATH 271, 312, and 323. (3)

MATH 450. Teaching of Secondary Mathematics. Materials and methods of instruction of secondary mathematics, including issues of student teaching; does not count as part of the major or minor in mathematics. (3)

MATH 461. Advanced Calculus I. Definite integrals, space integrals, elliptic functions and integrals, beta and gamma functions, Fourier series, and vectors. Prerequisite: MATH 271. (3)

MATH 462. Advanced Calculus II. Continuation of MATH 461. Prerequisite: MATH 461. (3)

MATH 471. Probability and Statistics I. Probability spaces, discrete and continuous random variables, expectations and the limit theorems, estimation, hypotheses testing, and confidence intervals. Prerequisite: MATH 172. (3)

MATH 472. Probability and Statistics II. Continuation of MATH 471. Prerequisite: MATH 471. (3)

MATH 485. Directed Study in Mathematics. Allows a student to work with a professor in an area of mathematics not covered in any of the department offerings. (1-3)

MATH 496. Senior Project and Seminar. A culmination of the mathematics major with a full semester project bringing together the various concepts in mathematics. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (3)

Movement Sciences Activity Courses

MVSC 103 Walkacise/Lifetime Wellness 1
MVSC 104 Advanced Walkacise (Prerequisite: MVSC 103) 1
MVSC 105 Weight Training/Lifetime Wellness 1
MVSC 106 Self-Defense 1
MVSC 107 Kickboxing 1
MVSC 108 Group Strength 1
MVSC 109 Circuit Training/Lifetime Wellness (special fee) 1
MVSC 112 Beginning Archery 1
MVSC 113 Intermediate Archery 1
MVSC 114 Pilates 1
MVSC 115 Yoga 1
MVSC 118 Beginning Golf (special fee) 1
MVSC 119 Intermediate Golf (special fee) 1
MVSC 120 Modern Dance 1
MVSC 121 Outdoor Experiences (special fee) 1
MVSC 123 Tap Dancing 1
MVSC 124 Beginning Badminton 1
MVSC 125 Intermediate Badminton 1
MVSC 126 Aqualatis 1

MVSC 127 Activity for Students w/ Disabilities I/Lifetime Wellness 1 MVSC 128 Activity for Students w/ Disabilities II 1 MVSC 129 Salsa 1 MVSC 132 Belly Dancing 1 MVSC 133 Mexican Folk Dance 1 MVSC 134 Beginning Tennis 1 MVSC 135 Intermediate Tennis 1 MVSC 136 Softball/Baseball 1 MVSC 137 Beginning Racquetball 1 MVSC 138 Intermediate Racquetball 1 MVSC 139 Water Aerobics (special fee) 1 MVSC 140 Beginning Swimming (special fee) 1 MVSC 141 Intermediate Swimming (Prerequisite: MVSC 140) (special fee) 1 MVSC 143 Lifeguarding (special fee) 1 MVSC 144 Water Safety Instruction (Prerequisite: MVSC 143) (special fee) 2 MVSC 145 Soccer 1 MVSC 146 Handball 1 MVSC 147 Volleyball 1 MVSC 148 Basketball 1 MVSC 151 Social Dance 1 MVSC 152 Folk Dance 1 MVSC 153 American Country Dance 1 MVSC 157 Step Aerobics/Lifetime Wellness 1 MVSC 158 Hip-Hop Jazz 1

MVSC 213. First Aid. Development of skills and knowledge necessary in an emergency to help sustain life, reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until more advanced medical care arrives. Successful completion of course includes American Red Cross certification. (2)

MVSC 214. Clinical 1: Orientation to Athletic Training. This course will focus on the overall responsibilities of daily operation of a functional athletic training facility. Topics include event scheduling, coverage, facility setup, and sanitation measures.

Prerequisites: MVSC 213, 215, and NUR 170. Corequisites: BIOL 254/256 and MVSC 220. (1)

MVSC 215. Basic Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries. Familiarizes students with common athletic injuries as well as first aid procedures for common and life threatening injuries. Prerequisite: MVSC 213. (3)

MVSC 216. Clinical 2: Taping/Bracing. The student will learn and perfect various taping and bracing methods and applications. Prerequisites: MVSC 214, 220. Corequisites: BIOL 255/257 and WELL 300. (2)

MVSC 218. Introduction to Coaching. An introduction to coaching as a career. Emphasis on planning and implementing a program based upon the sports sciences. Field experience required. (3)

MVSC 220. Advanced Athletic Training. Advanced study in the recognition, evaluation, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic-related injuries.The course will also emphasize the education and counseling of athletes as well as the organization and administration of a training program. Prerequisites: MVSC 213 and 215. (3)

MVSC 240/242. Anatomical and Physiological Kinesiology & lab. A study of the basic and applied structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and endocrine systems (approved for general education requirement in lab sciences), (3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab). (4)

MVSC 245. History and Philosophy of Movement Sciences. Provides an understanding and appreciation of contemporary movement sciences based upon knowledge of past social forces, conditions, movements, and philosophies which have shaped the present. Prerequisite: MVSC 240/242. (2)

MVSC 250. EMT Basic. Course includes bandaging, soft-tissue injuries, circulatory, nervous, and respiratory systems; cardiopulmonary resuscitation, common medical emergencies, emergency childbirth, lifting and moving patients; muscle and skeletal systems, emergency care of upper and lower extremities; hazardous material management, use of M.A.S.T. pants and extrication and disentanglement procedures. (6)

MVSC 302. Teaching Outdoors & Initiative Activities. Designed to prepare professionals to teach outdoor and cooperative/initiative/adventure activities. Prerequisites: MVSC 213, 227, and 245. (2)

MVSC 303. Teaching Individual & Team Sports. Designed to prepare professionals to teach the development of skills and game strategies for soccer, volleyball, golf, badminton, and tennis. Prerequisites: MVSC 103 and 213. (3)

MVSC 312. Clinical 3: Equipment Fitting. This class will present the various components associated with proper techniques of fitting, reconditioning, and fabrication of athletic equipment. Prerequisites: MVSC 216. Corequisite: MVSC 341/342, WELL 350 and 361. (2)

MVSC 318. Movement and Wellness for Young Children. Includes theory and practical application of movement and wellness experiences appropriate for young children. (3)

MVSC 322. Clinical 4: Manual Muscle Testing. The student will develop an understanding of how to manually test various muscles throughout the body. Special emphasis is placed on muscles commonly associated with athletic injury. Prerequisites: MVSC 240/242 and 312. Corequisites: MVSC 324 and 343. (3)

MVSC 324. Clinical 5: Special Testing. The student will develop special skills in determining the extent of injury by learning and performing various assessment tests over portions of the anatomy. Prerequisites: MVSC 240/242, 312, and 341/342. Corequisites: MVSC 322 and 343. (3)

MVSC 327. Pedagogy in Movement Sciences. Designed to develop basic teaching skills of future professionals in movement sciences. Prerequisites: MVSC 103 and 213. (3)

MVSC 341/342. Physiology of Exercise & lab. A study of the physiological effects of exercise with primary emphasis on bioenergetics, neuromuscular functions, cardio-respiratory considerations, and physical training (3 hours lecture and 2 hours lab). Prerequisites: MVSC 213, 240/242. (4)

MVSC 343. Biomechanics. The study of stability, motion, force, and leverage principles as they apply to basic patterns of human movement; emphasizes the optimization of motor performance through the use of mechanical analysis. Prerequisites: MVSC 341/342. (3)

MVSC 381. Internship - Sports Medicine. Field experience including 135 hours of internship in athletic training settings supervised by qualified medical personnel. Prerequisites: MVSC 215 and 220. (3)

MVSC 400. Motor Behavior. A study of how individuals learn and perform motor skills with special emphasis on mental and psychological aspects of learning and practical applications to teaching and coaching. Prerequisite: MVSC 343. (3)

MVSC 402. Adapted Movement Sciences. Basic scientific principles of physical education for the disabled child; areas of concentration include deviations from the normal, and selection and adaptation of activities to suit the needs of the disabled. Field experience required. Prerequisites: MVSC 343. (3)

MVSC 406. Sports Psychology. Provides an understanding of the psychological issues related to sport and coaching. (3)

MVSC 408. Assessment in Movement Sciences. The practical use and value of tests and measurements in movement science evaluation; includes a survey of literature, followed by a variety of laboratory and field assessment. Prerequisite: MVSC 400. (3)

MVSC 410. Therapeutic Exercises. The student will become familiar with the principles of therapeutic exercise as well as have an opportunity to develop rehabilitation programs for athletic injuries. Prerequisite: MVSC 343. Corequisites: MVSC 422 and WELL 464. (3)

MVSC 422. Clinical 6:Visitation. Field experience including 135 hours of internship in athletic training settings supervised by qualified medical personnel. Prerequisite: MVSC 343. Corequisites: MVSC 410 and WELL 464. (3)

MVSC 423. Physical Education for the Elementary Classroom Teacher.

Designed to prepare elementary classroom teachers to be effective physical education teachers. Includes delivery of developmentally appropriate activities, assessment, and curriculum development related standards and benchmarks. (3)

MVSC 425. P-12 Movement Sciences Curriculum. The purpose of this course is to provide future P-12 physical educators with the theoretical background, movement experiences, management skills, instructional planning, implementation, and assessment methodology both necessary and essential for use in P-12 classes. The course will also address rhythms, dance, and various other fitness activities. Prerequisites: MVSC 303. (6)

MVSC 427. Developing Teaching Skills in Movement Sciences. The purpose of this course is the development of techniques and strategies necessary for the effective teaching of movement sciences. Laboratory experiences will be emphasized. Field experience required. (4)

MVSC 430. Clinical 7: MockTesting. The student will have the opportunity to explore sample testing in preparation for the National Athletic Trainers Association Board of Certification exam. Prerequisite: MVSC 422. Corequisites: MVSC 400 and 450. (2)

MVSC 440. Exercise Prescription for Special Populations. Enhances the understanding and application of exercise physiology through the learning of special considerations and adaptations of the elderly and those with various illnesses and diseases. Emphasis will be placed on application of knowledge and familiarity with cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and metabolic diseases. Prerequisites: MVSC 343 and 441. Corequisites: WELL 350. (3)

MVSC 441. Principles of Conditioning. Enhances the understanding and application of exercise physiology through the learning of the principles and adaptations to various conditioning programs. Upon successful completion, students will be able to design programs to meet a variety of performance goals. Prerequisite: MVSC 341. Corequisite: MVSC 343. (3)

MVSC 445. Sport in American Culture. Examines the relationship of sport to American culture. Topics include children, schools, deviance, violence, gender relations, group relations, economy, and media as they relate to sport. (3)

MVSC 450. Therapeutic Modalities. This course will present the physiological effects, indications, contradictions, and dosage utilized throughout various treatments of athletic injuries. Prerequisite: MVSC 422. Corequisites: MVSC 400 and

430. (3)

MVSC 481. Internship in Movement Sciences. Field experience including 90 hours of supervised internship experience in an approved corporate, community, or private fitness or physical performance enhancement program. (3)

Music

MUSC 100 or 300. Applied Music. One credit hour is given for one twenty-five minute private lesson per week and two credit hours are given for fifty minute lessons. Two credit hours requires concurrent registration and participation in the Applied Music Laboratory and in a major ensemble — university choir for voice students; university band, orchestra, or jazz ensemble for wind and percussion students. May be repeated for credit. MUSC 300 requires a juried audition or permission of the instructor.

MUSC 100A, 300A Applied Music - Piano 1-2 MUSC 100B, 300B Applied Music - Piano 1-2 MUSC 100C, 300C Applied Music - Organ 1-2 MUSC 100D, 300D Applied Music - Flute 1-2 MUSC 100E, 300E Applied Music - Woodwinds 1-2 MUSC 100F, 300F Applied Music - High Brass 1-2 MUSC 100G, 300G Applied Music - Low Brass 1-2 MUSC 100I, 300I Applied Music - High Strings 1-2 MUSC 100J, 300J Applied Music - Low Strings 1-2 MUSC 100K, 300K Applied Music - Guitar 1-2 MUSC 100L, 300L Applied Music - Voice 1-2 MUSC 100M, 300M Applied Music - Voice 1-2 MUSC 100N, 300N Applied Music - Voice 1-2 MUSC 100P, 300P Applied Music - Percussion 1-2 MUSC 100R, 300R Applied Music - Improvisation 1-2

MUSC 102 or 302. Applied Music Laboratory. Performance in a workshop format providing guidance and support as the students gain valuable experience, required for majors. (1)

MUSC 101. University Choir. Open to all WNMU students. The performance of a wide variety of choral literature drawn from the finest contemporary, historical, and traditional repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 104. Piano Adventures I. Designed for all levels of applied skill. Piano Adventures I meets General Education Expressive Arts requirement and is opened to Concurrent, Students with Special Needs and all non-music major students in any declared or non-declared major desiring to acquire, maintain or advance their progressive keyboard skills and may be repeated each semester for credit. (Applied Music Lab 102 not required) (1 or 2)

MUSC 105/108. The Heard-Vocal Ensemble & Lab. Show Choir performing a wide variety of choral literature set to choreography drawn from the finest contemporary and traditional show music repertoire. Open to all WNMU students. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (2-4)

MUSC 106. University Orchestra. Open to all WNMU students, community members, and concurrently enrolled high school students who play strings, wind, percussion instruments, or piano. The performance of a wide variety of orchestral literature taken from the finest traditional and contemporary repertoire. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 107. Instrumental Chamber Ensemble. Open to all WNMU students, community members, and concurrently enrolled high school students who play string, wind, percussion instruments, or piano. The performance of a wide variety of literature. Groups formed on the basis of filling needs within a given ensemble (woodwind quintet, brass trio, string quartet, percussion ensemble, drumline, etc.). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 111. Music Appreciation. Highlights of formal musical development from early church music to music of modern times with the emphasis on a listening experience. (NMCCN MUSI 1113) (Area V). (3)

MUSC 112. History of Rock and Roll. Survey of Rock Styles and major performers from the 1950’s to the present. (3)

MUSC 113. Class Piano I. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Course designed to provide a sound musical foundation that consolidates the keyboard skills and information learned in the total curriculum. Students acquire the hands-on tools and knowledge in basic keyboard skills. No piano experience required. May be repeated for credit up to 4 credit hours. (2)

MUSC 116. Class Piano II. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Course designed to provide a sound musical foundation that consolidates the keyboard skills and information learned in the total curriculum. Students acquire the hands-on tools and knowledge in basic keyboard skills. No piano experience required. May be repeated for credit up to 4 credit hours. (2)

MUSC 119. Fundamentals of Music. Learning to read, write, and perform music. Includes basic theory, singing, and the playing of various instruments. (3)

MUSC 120. Applied Piano Proficiency I. A required Piano Proficiency exam for all music majors, including education majors pursuing a teaching field in music Education (Music Endorsement), must pass the piano proficiency exam prior to graduating. May be repeated each semester for credit until certified. (1-2)

MUSC 121/123. Music Theory I & lab. The study of tonal structure based on seventeenth and eighteenth century harmonic practice including tonality, cadences, intervals, chords, melodic structure, functional analysis, and creative composition. The lab develops listening skills and sightsinging through the use of solfeggio, intervals, as well as rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite: MUSC 119 or departmental theory exam. (4)

MUSC 122/124. Music Theory II & lab. The sequential continuation of Music Theory I. Prerequisite: MUSC 121/123. (4)

MUSC 126. Class Guitar I. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Introduction to beginning guitar techniques in a group setting. Studies will include learning chord structure, scales and theory. Permission of the Instructor.

(2)

MUSC 127. Class Guitar II. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Introduction to intermediate guitar techniques in a group setting. Studies will include learning advanced chord structure, scales and theory. Permission of the Instructor. (2)

MUSC 141. Instrumental Techniques. A preparation for teaching instrumental music in the public schools focusing on one of the following instrumental families each semester:

MUSC 141B - Instrumental Techniques - Brass

MUSC 141P - Instrumental Techniques - Percussion

MUSC 141S - Instrumental Techniques - Strings

MUSC 141W -Instrumental Techniques - Woodwinds The development of playing facility and teaching skill is accomplished. (1)

MUSC 151. University Band. Open to all WNMU students. The performance of a wide variety of literature drawn from the finest contemporary and traditional marching and concert repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 171. Jazz Ensemble. Open to all WNMU students. The performance of a wide variety of jazz styles from swing to fusion with solo opportunities for qualified members. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 213. Survey of Jazz Styles. An in-depth listening experience in the development of jazz from the earliest days of the blues and ragtime to the fusion medium of today; includes exposure to the contributions of many jazz greats, such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, and the innovators of today. (3)

MUSC 221/223. Music Theory III & lab. The study and analysis of nineteenth and twentieth century harmonic techniques including chromaticism, impressionism, atonality, serialism, and creative composition. The lab continues the advancement of listening skills and sightsinging through the use of solfeggio, intervals, as well as rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite: MUSC 122/124. (4)

MUSC 222/224. Music Theory IV & lab. The sequential continuation of Music Theory III. Prerequisite: MUSC 221/223. (4)

MUSC 242. Vocal Techniques. A preparation for teaching vocal music in the public schools with emphasis on the solo experience through the development of vocal technique and pedagogy in a workshop setting. Offered Fall, every other year. (1)

MUSC 301. University Choir. Open to all WNMU students. The performance of a wide variety of choral literature drawn from the finest contemporary, historical, and traditional repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 303. Fundamentals of Music for Elementary Teachers. Basic rhythm and melodic notation, scale and key recognition, song leading and group performance practices, techniques on the recorder, keyboard, and string instruments; the creative approach of Kodaly/Orff methods. Not open to music performance majors and minors. (3)

MUSC 305/308. The Heard-Vocal Ensemble & Lab. Show Choir performing a wide variety of choral literature set to choreography drawn from the finest contemporary and traditional show music repertoire. Open to all WNMU students. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (2-4)

MUSC 306. University Orchestra. Open to all WNMU students, community members, and concurrently enrolled high school students who play strings, wind, or percussion instruments or piano. The performance of a wide variety of orchestral literature taken from the finest traditional and contemporary repertoire. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 307. Instrumental Chamber Ensemble. Open to all WNMU students, community members, and concurrently enrolled high school students who play string, wind, percussion instruments or piano. The performance of a wide variety of literature. Groups formed on the basis of filling needs within a given ensemble (woodwind quintet, brass trio, string quartet, percussion ensemble, drumline, etc.). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 313. Class Piano III. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Course designed to provide a sound musical foundation that consolidates the keyboard skills and information learned in the total curriculum. Students acquire the hands-on tools and knowledge in basic keyboard skills. No piano experience required. May be repeated for credit up to 4 credit hours. (2)

MUSC 314. Elementary Classroom Music Methods and Observation. Instruction and practice in elementary music teaching methods. Includes application of Dalcroze/Orff/Kodaly approaches related to each grade level and field observation. (Suggested for elementary education students who have taken MUSC 303). (3)

MUSC 316. Class Piano IV. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Course designed to provide a sound musical foundation that consolidates the keyboard skills and information learned in the total curriculum. Students acquire the hands-on tools and knowledge in basic keyboard skills. No piano exerience required. May be repeated for credit up to 4 credit hours. (2)

MUSC 320. Applied Piano Proficiency II. A required Piano Proficiency exam for all music majors, including education majors pursuing a teaching field in music education (music endorsement), must pass the piano proficiency exam prior to graduating. May be repeated each semester for credit until certified. (1-2)

MUSC 321. Counterpoint. A study of eighteenth century counterpoint including limited species writing with emphasis on composition of two-and three-part inventions, chorale preludes, and fugues based on analysis of J.S. Bach’s “Art of the Fugue,” and “Well-Tempered Clavier.” Prerequisites: MUSC 222/224. (3)

MUSC 326. Class Guitar III. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Introduction to intermediate guitar techniques in a group setting. Studies will include learning advanced chord structure, scales and theory. Permission of the Instructor (2)

MUSC 327. Class Guitar IV. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Introduction to intermediate guitar techniques in a group setting. Studies will include learning advanced chord structure, scales, and theory. Permission of the Instructor. (2)

MUSC 329. Introduction to Recording. Open to all students in any declared or non-declared major. Introduction to recording technology and the different applications of analog and digital recording in the process of recording, mixing and mastering. Course will include hands on labs, as well as in depth studies into the technical knowledge needed to be successful. (3)

MUSC 330. Instrumental Music Methods and Observation. Philosophy and methodology of teaching instrumental music in the secondary schools including administration, concert planning, organizing the marching band, show planning, training auxiliaries, discipline, and field observation. (3)

MUSC 341. Instrumental Techniques. A preparation for teaching instrumental music in the public schools focusing on one of the following instrumental families each semester:

MUSC 341B - Instrumental Techniques - Brass

MUSC 341P - Instrumental Techniques - Percussion

MUSC 341S - Instrumental Techniques - Strings

MUSC 341W -Instrumental Techniques - Woodwinds The development of playing facility and teaching skill is accomplished. (1)

MUSC 351. University Band. Open to all WNMU students. The performance of a wide variety of literature drawn from the finest contemporary and traditional marching and concert repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 360.Vocal Music Methods and Observation. Philosophy and methodology of teaching vocal music in the secondary schools including administration, organization, implementation, discipline, and field observation. (3)

MUSC 362. Conducting I. Fundamentals of baton technique and score analysis; equal attention given to choral and instrumental procedures. Prerequisite: MUSC 222/224. Offered Fall, every other year. (1)

MUSC 363. Conducting II. The sequential continuation of Conducting I with additional emphasis on score analysis and nuances of more expressive conducting. Prerequisite: MUSC 362. Offered Spring, every other year. (1)

MUSC 371. Jazz Ensemble. The performance of a wide variety of jazz styles from swing to fusion with solo opportunities for qualified members. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (1 or 2)

MUSC 372. Jazz Theory and Arranging I. The study of jazz theory, chord symbols and changes, scales, and modes. Composition and arranging for a variety of jazz ensembles with the opportunity to have all works performed. A two-semester sequence with the first semester devoted to theoretical study. Prerequisites: MUSC 222/224 and 461. (3)

MUSC 373. Jazz Theory and Arranging II. A continuation of MUSC 372. A two-semester sequence with the second semester given to composition and arranging. Prerequisite: MUSC 372. (3)

MUSC 411. History of Music I. The study of the history and literature of Western music from the earliest times through the Baroque period. Offered Fall, every other year. (3)

MUSC 412. History of Music II. The study of history and literature of Western music from Classical to the twentieth century. Offered Spring, every other year. (3)

MUSC 422. Musical Form. The study of formal design and structure in representative scores of Western music from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: MUSC 222/224. (2)

MUSC 461. Instrumentation and Arranging. The methods of achieving the multiplicity of tonal colors in band, orchestra, and chorus. Includes transcriptions for instruments and choral arranging. Prerequisite: MUSC 222/224. (2)

Nursing

NUR 100. Nursing Assistant. Theory and basic nursing care skills will be taught with an emphasis being placed on the psychosocial-cultural approach to patient care. This course will prepare the student to function in the traditional nursing assistant role in hospitals, home health agencies, and long-term care facilities. At the successful completion of the course, the student will be eligible for the Certified Nursing Assistant Examination. The course includes both classroom theory, laboratory experience, and applied learning in patient care situations. (6)

NUR 101/103. Fundamentals of Nursing & lab. Introduction to the theoretical framework for the nursing program, nursing process, and fundamental skills. Laboratory experiences will focus on the care of the geriatric patient. Open to students who have been admitted to the nursing program. Lab is offered on a pass/ fail basis. (6)

NUR 102. Nursing Assistant in Gerontology. Theory and basic nursing care skills will be taught with an emphasis being placed on the psychosocial-cultural approach to patient care. This course will prepare the student to function in the traditional nursing assistant role with geriatric clients in hospitals, home health agencies and long term care facilities. At the successful completion of the course, the student will be eligible for the Certified Nursing Assistant Examination. (7)

NUR 105. Nursing Success Seminar. A seminar for students who are entering the Associate Degree Program at WNMU. The course will examine the unique nature of nursing school and will emphasize the development of critical thinking skills and study skills for professional education. Corequisite: NUR 101. (2)

NUR 150/152. Medical-Surgical Nursing & lab. Application of nursing process and theoretical concepts to the care of medical-surgical and geriatric patients. Laboratory experiences will include acute and long-term care settings. Open to students who have been admitted to the nursing program. Lab is offered on a pass/ fail basis. Prerequisites: NUR 101/103, BIOL 254/256, CHEM 121/123, and MATH 111 or 125. (8)

NUR 160/162. Nursing Articulation & lab. Required for Licensed Practical Nursing Students, transfer students, and any students re-entering the program. Current students may elect to take it for review. The focus of the course will be a review of skills and introduction to the theoretical concepts emphasized in the first year of the Nursing Program. Open to students who have been admitted to the nursing program. Lab is offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: NUR 170, BIOL 255/257, CHEM 121/123, MATH 111 or 125, WELL 300, ENGL 101 and PSY 102. (5)

NUR 170. Pharmacology. Basic therapeutic actions of various types of commonly used drugs. Emphasis will be placed on the classification of medications, therapeutic action, adverse reactions, and routes of administration. Drug interactions and contraindications will be presented. This course will also contain a unit on calculation of dosages and solutions. Only students who have been admitted to the nursing program may enroll in this course. Prerequisites: NUR 101/103, BIOL 254/256, CHEM 121/123 and MATH 111 or 125. (3)

NUR 200/202. Maternal/Newborn Nursing & lab. Application of the nursing process to the care of mothers and children. Students will work with expectant mothers and families in a variety of settings. Open to students who have been admitted to the nursing program. Lab is offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: NUR 150/152, 170, BIOL 255/257, WELL 300, ENGL 101, PSY 102, 301. (5)

NUR 210/212. Pediatric Nursing & lab. Application of nursing process to the care of children. Open to students who have been admitted to the nursing program. Lab is offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: NUR 200/202. (5)

NUR 250. Health Care Issues and Trends. Seminar course designed to increase the student’s understanding of current issues in nursing and health care. Group discussion and debate will be used to examine such issues as living will, the patient’s right to die, burnout, the nursing shortage, and current trends in the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: NUR 210/212. (2)

NUR 260/262. Mental Health Nursing and Leadership & lab. Focus on the nurse-client relationship as a therapeutic tool in caring for clients in psychiatric settings. Students will participate in treatment modalities in a variety of settings. In addition, content on nursing leadership and management will be addressed. Open to students who have been admitted to the nursing program. Lab is offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: NUR 250, BIOL 371/373. (6)

NUR 270/272. Advanced Medical-Surgical Nursing & lab. Development of skills necessary to manage the care of a group of patients with common well-defined problems. The preceptorship experience will help students with the transition to the work setting following graduation. Open to students who have been admitted to the nursing program. Lab is offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: NUR 260/262. (6)

NUR 304. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine into Nursing Practice. Historical uses, current uses, and research literature will be analyzed as they pertain to Complementary and Alternative Medicine practices (CAM). Emphasis will be on integrating evidence-based practice into the nursing role. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (2)

NUR 325. Health Assessment. Nursing data collection including a nursing history and physical assessment on clients of all ages. Biopsychosocial, cultural, and developmental history data as well as physical examination aspects of the assessment phase of the nursing process will be emphasized in depth and applied in laboratory practice. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (4)

NUR 332. Nursing Research. Introduction to concepts and issues in nursing research. Emphasis in this course is on the research process, research designs, reading and critiquing research, and research utilization. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. MATH 321 (3)

NUR 336. Pathophysiology for Nurses. The study of complex human disease processes, along with appropriate nursing assessments and care strategies. Prerequisites: Admission to the RN to BSN program. BIOL 255 and 257. (4)

NUR 405. Family Systems. Focus on the family as a unit of care. In addition, students will conceptualize family, the life span spectrum of its members and culture and their relationships to practice. Included will be the relationship of aging in family and culture, problem-based cases, interdisciplinary care, and dying, violence, abuse, family dynamics, and legal decision making for family members. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. NUR 332. (4)

NUR 406. Critical Thinking in Professional Nursing. Strategies designed to enhance critical thinking and analysis skills of the professional nurse. The student will explore the relationship between theory, clinical judgement, and caring. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (3)

NUR 407. Leadership Roles. Organization, management, leadership, and change as they relate to health care systems/settings at the unit level. Emphasis on the growth of the professional role as manager of care; includes the critical examination into management and leadership roles, collaboration, impact of culture on institutional structure, development of teams and interdisciplinary approaches to care, budgeting and finance role development, change process and development of a professional philosophy, in addition to the ethical issues in management. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (3)

NUR 408. Issues in Professional Nursing. Theoretical presentation of issues and trends that impact the nursing profession. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of current literature surrounding selected topics. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (3)

NUR 410. Assessment Validation. Independent study mechanism for validation of assessment skills. The course will focus on gathering psychosocial information and performing physical assessments on clients of any age. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (2)

NUR 415. Health Care Policy and Ethics. Evaluation of power, politics and health policy; exploration of professional nursing roles in health policy development; includes legal issues in nursing. Examination of ethical dilemmas in health care from both the consumer and nursing perspectives. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. NUR 332. (4)

NUR 429. Utilizing Resources. Builds an academic and technical skill foundation for RN students who will be completing their BSN course work at a distance using Web-CT. Emphasis on the development of a learning community that supports and facilitates the participation of all the members of the course. Introduction to critical thinking, effective written discussions (WEB), and access to library/data resources as they apply to changing nursing practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (2)

NUR 432. Nursing Informatics. Use of information management and computers in a variety of health care applications, including hospital information system and patient record systems. The internet will be discussed as a source of health care information. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (2)

NUR 441. Perioperative Nursing. Designed for the registered nurse as an in-depth introduction to perioperative nursing. It presents information and concepts that are essential to the perioperative nursing practice and are encountered at the entry level requiring early mastery. This course is open to LPN’s and RN’s. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (4)

NUR 446. Community Health Nursing. Theoretical and clinical study of nursing care for communities and vulnerable populations. Covers epidemiology, public health principles, environmental health, health promotion, grant writing skills introductions, and community nursing roles. Clinical coursework includes needs assessment and intervention planning for a selected vulnerable group in the community. Writing Intensive Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. NUR 332 and 405. (6)

NUR 470. Nursing Organization and Management. Classical and contemporary theories of organizational behavior in the health care setting on a macro level. Leadership theories and development of a personal philosophy of leadership in nursing. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program. (3).

Occupational Therapy Assistant

PREREQUISITES: High School Biology and Algebra or equivalent with grade of C or higher. Prerequisites must have been completed within the past five years (High School Chemistry is strongly recommended).

OTA 155. Orientation to Occupational Therapy. An introduction to occupational therapy and its philosophy; various work settings and other professions that OT collaborates with; role delineation of the COTA and OTR. (3)

OTA 156. Fieldwork Level Ia. During the two year coursework, students will spend 2-4 hours per week in various settings to observe individuals with conditions and diagnoses that interfere with human function and occupation. These classes are to be completed sequentially. Only one Level I Fieldwork class may be repeated one time. In addition, seminars are conducted to process the fieldwork experience. (1) OTA 160. OT in Growth and Development. A complete study of the human organism from conception to death, exploring all the developmental stages with emphasis on the neurological, psychological, and social development and relationship to human occupation. Prerequisite: Admission to OTA program or permission of the instructor. (3)

OTA 161. Fieldwork Level Ib. Continuation of Fieldwork sequence. Only one Level I Fieldwork class may be repeated one time. Prerequisite: OTA 156. (1)

OTA 165. Principles of Occupational Therapy. Specific theory and philosophy with regard to physical, psychological, and developmental diagnoses including terminology. Prerequisite: OTA 155. (3)

OTA 220. OT Therapeutic Media. Introduction to basic treatment, activity analysis, media, and its application to various diagnoses. Prerequisite: OTA 155. (3)

OTA 223. Fieldwork Level Ic. Continuation of Fieldwork sequence. Only one Level I Fieldwork class may be repeated one time. Prerequisite: OTA 161. (2)

OTA 230. Functional Kinesiology in Occupational Therapy. A complete study of functional Kinesiology as it relates to the field of Occupational Therapy. Major emphasis will be placed on the function and structure of the upper extremity and rehabilitative principles as they apply to the field of Occupational Therapy. Prerequisites: BIOL 255/257, OTA 165. (3)

OTA 240. OT in Physical Disabilities I. First semester of a two semester course that focuses on history, theory, process, evaluation, and broad aspects of treating physical disabilities. Prerequisites: OTA 155, 165. (3)

OTA 241. OT in Physical Disabilities II. This second semester will focus on the various occupational therapy treatment interventions; rehabilitation techniques covered will include the fabrication of assistive devices, splints, and other adaptive equipment. Prerequisite: OTA 240. (3)

OTA 242. OT in Psychosocial Dysfunction. Instruction and practices in techniques used with long and short term psychiatric conditions, behavior disorders in children and adults. Prerequisite: OTA 165. (3)

OTA 245. OT in Pediatrics. Instruction and practice in conditions commonly seen in school and hospital practice, such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida, mental retardation, and learning disabilities. Prerequisites: OTA 160, 165. (3)

OTA 250. OT in Geriatric Practice. Theory and practices commonly seen in the area of Occupational Therapy geriatric practice. A variety or practice settings including community based wellness practice will be explored. Wellness, occupation, and adaptation in the normal aging process will be emphasized. Prerequisite: OTA 165. (3)

OTA 255. OT Program Development. Procedures, techniques, and resources for developing programs in any setting common to the practice of occupational therapy. Prerequisite: OTA 165. (3)

OTA 256. Fieldwork Level Id. Continuation of Fieldwork sequence. Only one Level I Fieldwork class may be repeated one time. Prerequisite: OTA 223. (2)

OTA 270. Fieldwork Level IIa. Upon successful completion of the two year coursework, students will spend 16 weeks under the supervision of an OTR or COTA in at least two different settings to gain skill in the practice of occupational therapy. OTA 270 and 272 must be completed within 18 months from completion of academic portion of the program. Only one of the Level II Fieldwork classes may be repeated, one time only. Prerequisite: All Academic and Fieldwork Level I classes in the OTA program. All coursework must be completed within five years of admission to the program. (6)

OTA 272. Fieldwork Level IIb. Final section of Fieldwork sequence. Only one Level II Fieldwork class may be repeated one time. Prerequisite: OTA 270. (6)

Philosophy

PHIL 100. Introduction to Philosophy. Will acquaint the student with philosophical problems and methods through systematic discussion of selected questions concerning the nature and grounds of knowledge, morality, and religion. (NMCCN PHIL 1113)(Area V). (3)

PHIL 101. Thinking and Problem Solving. Development of such problem-solving techniques as common sense, verification of facts, validity of logic, existentialist analysis, and computer modeling; explores the humanistic value of thinking in itself as distinguished from problem-solving. (3)

PHIL 200. Contemporary Philosophy and Religious Thought. An analysis of perennial problems of religion and solutions of them by recent thinkers: religion and science, revelation and reason, grounds for belief in God, and relation of God to the world. (3)

PHIL 201. Logical Methods. Will aid the student in critical thinking; analysis of ethical, emotional, logical appeals, and fallacies in argument. (NMCCN PHIL 1213). (3)

PHIL 211. Survey of the New Testament. Introduction to literary content of New Testament writings; examination of the historical, religious, cultural and political contexts of New Testament writings and their authors; special attention given to apocalyptic and apocryphal themes. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and 102. (3)

PHIL 300. Recent Philosophy. A critical examination of important trends in American and European philosophy of the recent past, particularly various schools of linguistic analysis, phenomenology, logical positivism, and existentialism. (3)

PHIL 400-404. Problems of Philosophy. A critical examination of philosophical problems and issues, including selected problems of language, theory of knowledge, ethics, and science. (3)

Physical Science

PHSC 101/103. Physical Science for General Education I & lab (Physics, Chemistry). Lecture and laboratory covering physical science principles in chemistry and physics. The intention of this course is to promote an understanding and appreciation of the science of the physical world in which we live. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. (4)

PHSC 102/104. Physical Science for General Education II & lab (Earth and Space Science). Lecture and laboratory covering physical science principles in earth science including topics in meteorology, rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, geologic time scale, and astronomy. The intention of this course is to promote an understanding and appreciation of the science of the physical world in which we live.Three lectures and one laboratory per week; PHSC 101/103 need not be taken prior to PHSC 102/104. (4)

PHSC 115/116. Descriptive Astronomy & lab. Survey of the Universe from Earth to the Galaxies. Requires some simple algebra. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Offered fall of even-numbered years. (NMCCN ASTR 1113/1111) (Area III). (4)

PHSC 131/133. Essentials of Physical Evidence & lab. An introduction to the application of chemical and physical scientific techniques to the analysis of physical evidence as applied to law enforcement. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the WNMU Law Enforcement Training Academy. (4)

PHSC 171/173. Forensic Science I & lab. Application of scientific techniques and instrumentation, chemical and physical, to the analysis of physical evidence and to the accumulation and presentation of evidence useful in identifying the criminal. Topics covered will include the Introduction to Forensic Science, The Crime Scene, Physical Evidence, Glass and Soil, Organic Analysis, Inorganic Analysis, The Microscope, Hairs, Fibers, Paint, Drugs, and Toxicology. (4)

PHSC 172/174. Forensic Science II & lab. Continuation of PHSC 171/173. Application of scientific techniques and instrumentation, chemical and physical, to the analysis of physical evidence and to the accumulation and presentation of evidence useful in identifying the criminal. Topics covered will include the Introduction to Forensic Science, The Crime Scene, Physical Evidence, Glass and Soil, Organic Analysis, Inorganic Analysis, The Microscope, Hairs, Fibers, Paint, Drugs, and Toxicology. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. (4)

PHSC 321. Science for the Elementary School Teacher. Covers the problems of science as taught in the elementary school; discusses and demonstrates various science topics; introduces background material so that the teacher will have a sound understanding of the subject matter of first through sixth grade science. (3)

PHSC 480/580. Physical Science Workshop for Teachers. Covers the problems of science as taught in the elementary and secondary school; discusses and demonstrates various physical science topics; introduces background material so that the teacher will have a sound understanding of the subject matter. The “handson” approach will be emphasized. (3-4)

Physics

PHYS 151/153. General Physics (non-calculus) I & lab. First semester of introductory physics; includes a study of mechanics, sound, and heat; three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and 131. Offered fall of odd years. (NMCCN PHYS 1113/1111)(Area III). (4)

PHYS 152/154. General Physics (non-calculus) II & lab. Second semester of introductory physics; includes a study electricity, magnetism, and light. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 151/153. (NMCCN PHYS 1123/1121). (4)

PHYS 171/173. Principles of Physics (calculus-based) I & lab. A study of basic physics, employing calculus; includes a study of mechanics, sound, and heat; three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Offered fall of even years. Prerequisites: MATH 171 and 172 or permission of the instructor. (NMCCN PHYS 1213/1211)(Area III). (4)

PHYS 172/174. Principles of Physics (calculus-based) II & lab. Second semester of basic physics employing calculus; includes a study electricity, magnetism, and light. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 171/173. (NMCCN PHYS 1223/1221)(Area III). (4)

Political Science

POLS 201. American National Government. A basic introduction to politics and a general consideration of American national government from the theoretical, structural, and functional points of view. (NMCCN POLS 1123)(Area IV). Writing Intensive. (3)

POLS 202. American State Government. A general consideration of American state government from the theoretical, structural, and functional points of view. Special consideration will be given to the state government of New Mexico. (NMCCN POLS 1213)(Area IV). (3)

POLS 210. The Chicano Experience in the United States. A study of the culture, heritage, and social experience of the Mexican-American people in the United States with special emphasis on the Southwest. (3)

POLS 211. Minorities and Politics. A study of the emergence and progress of minority, civic, and political organizations, and the involvement of cultural minorities in the mainstream and non-traditional political organizations and activities; an assessment of the successes and failures of minorities in the United States political process. (3)

POLS 221. Politics Among Nations. A study of historical and present-day diplomatic practices of the major states of the world with one another. (3)

POLS/GEOG/HIST/PSY/SOC 297. Logic & Methods in the Social Sciences. An introduction to the logic and methods used in the social sciences with an emphasis on exposure to the components of research and scholarly literature. Prerequisite: ANTH 201, GEOG 202, HIST 111, POLS 201, PSY 102, SOC 101, or SOC 102. (1)

POLS 306. Political Parties. History, organization, and function of political parties with recognition of the influences of pressure groups. (3)

POLS 309. Constitutional Rights of Prisoners. This course will provide students with a basic introduction to and understanding of correctional law, and, more specifically, the acceptable and unacceptable correctional standards of behavior for the treatment of persons who are incarcerated in this country. Prisoner rights, a rather new and emerging field of law, shall be addressed in this course by focusing upon both legal and philosophical interpretations and analysis, as well as the careful review and study of relevant case-law. (3)

POLS/HIST 310. History and Politics of Colonial Mexico. Major focus is upon Mexico’s Indian past; the discovery, conquest, and colonization of New Spain; the emergence and role of the Catholic Church; and the Independence Movements; the war between Mexico and the U.S. and the protracted dictatorship of President Porfirio Diaz. (3)

POLS/HIST 311. History and Politics of Modern Mexico. An interpretive and analytical review of the History and Politics of Mexico from the advent of the Mexican Revolution of 1910-20 to contemporary times. Inter Alia we shall focus upon the outbreak of the Revolution; the chaotic Civil War among the revolutionary elements; the success of the insurgency; consolidation; and the contemporary political conditions in Mexico. Writing Intensive. (3)

POLS 312. American Foreign Relations. United States foreign policy viewed in historical context with considerable focus on the role of institutions, personalities, and events in the formulation and implementation of that policy. (3)

POLS 315.The American Presidency. The major emphasis is on the modern presidency; includes the responsibilities, authority, and the processes of leadership, control, coordination, and supervision which the presidency has developed and used. (3)

POLS 353. International Law and Organization. A study of the development of international law, its strengths and weaknesses, its successes and failures, and the legal relations between and among nations. A review of the structure and function of major world organizations will also be undertaken. (3)

POLS 401. Public Administration. The scope, nature, and trends of the administrative system of the United States including structure, organization, fiscal management, forms of administrative action, and the system of responsibility. Prerequisite: POLS 201. (3)

POLS 402. Latin-American Politics and Political Processes. A systematic study of the political dynamics, leadership, and the governmental institutions and processes of Latin America. (3)

POLS 405. American Constitutional Development. The leading constitutional principles of the American system of government as shaped by judicial interpretation; emphasizes the nature of judicial power, federalism, separation of powers, protection of individual rights, due process, police power, and the amendment process. Prerequisite: POLS 201 or permission of the instructor. (3)

POLS/HIST 406. American Political Thought. The origin and evolution of American political ideas from the early colonies to the present. Prerequisites: 6 hours of history or permission of the instructor. (3)

POLS 481. Internship in Political Science. (3-6)

POLS 485. Directed Study. (3)

POLS 496. Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences. A capstone experience for majors and/or minors in the Social Sciences. It brings together critical thinking, research and communication skills in an interdisciplinary context. A major research project is an important component of this course. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: declared major or minor in one of the Social Science disciplines, Junior or Senior status and must have completed at least 21 hours (for majors) or 15 hours (for minors). (3)

POLS/HIST 497. History and Politics of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. A review of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, from its cautious inception during the 1930's, through the bold and turbulent years from 1955 to 1975. Emphasis will be placed upon the early precursors, as well as the more prominent contemporary leaders; the different tactics and strategies employed; the nature and methods of the resistance; the slow but steady support from the U.S. government; major successes and failures of the Movement; and projections for the future of Civil Rights in America. (4)

POLS/HIST 498. History and Politics of the Vietnam War. A historical review and analysis of the emergence of a Vietnamese Nation and its eventual colonization by the French. Members will address the ``First’’ Vietnam War (against the French), followed by the achievement of independence and unification after the eventual withdrawal of the American military (the ``Second’’ Vietnam War). (4)

Psychology

PSY 102. General Psychology. An introduction to basic psychological concepts such as learning, motivation, emotion, and personality, as well as, an overview of major research findings about human behavior. (NMCCN PSYC 1113)(Area IV). (3)

PSY/GEOG/HIST/POLS/SOC 297. Logic & Methods in the Social Sciences. An introduction to the logic and methods used in the social sciences with an emphasis on exposure to the components of research and scholarly literature. Prerequisite: ANTH 201, GEOG 202, HIST 111, POLS 201, PSY 102, SOC 101, or SOC 102. (1)

PSY 301. Developmental Psychology. Study of behavior change throughout the life span and the determinants of these changes. Although attention will be given to major theories of development, this course emphasizes empirical research relating to infant capabilities, early childhood experiences, social behavior, cognition, sex typing, and socialization. Prerequisite: PSY 102. (3)

PSY 302. Educational Psychology. The application of psychological knowledge and techniques to the process of teaching and learning is emphasized in this course. It is designed to utilize what is known about cognitive processes and human behavior to improve teaching effectiveness. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: PSY 102. (3)

PSY 315/316. Physiological Psychology & lab. Psychological look at the body, behavior, and emotions. The physiology and neurology of behavior are emphasized including the function of the central nervous system, metabolism, and the role of neurotransmitters. Prerequisite: PSY 102. (4)

PSY 333/334. Experimental Psychology & lab. Psychological research as it pertains to behavior, cognition, and affect. The historical roots of psychological research are reviewed in relationship to the body of knowledge we currently have in the areas of social, clinical, educational/developmental, and cognitive psychology. Lab includes demonstration and analysis of basic experimental psychology research, perception, and experiments demonstrating current psychological theory; lab times are arranged by the instructor. Prerequisite: PSY 102, MATH 321 or SOC 323. (4)

PSY/SOC 401. Comparative Multicultural Social Studies. Hands-on experience with Mexican, Mexican-American, American Indian and rural Anglo cultures. Particular focus is placed on human and social services, education and agency approaches toward mental and physical health as well as legal issues. The academic perspective involves social psychology, clinical, counseling and educational frameworks. Individual, group and inter-group interactions are explored. The course involves an intense week-long exploration of the various cultures. Interaction with college students from other areas in the U.S. is part of the experience offered by this course. Prerequisites: SOC 101 for Sociology Majors, PSY 101 for Psychology Majors; and permission of the instructor. (3)

PSY 405. Psychology of Learning. Principles of learning theory directly applicable to effective teaching and counseling; considers the worth of learning theories of the recent past and relates them to good teaching and counseling techniques; provides a framework in which the student may apply theories of learning. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: PSY 102. (3)

PSY/SOC 406. Social Psychology. Introduction to social psychology from a symbolic interaction perspective. The course focuses on how humans make sense of and interpret their social world and react to the symbolic meanings attached to social life. Topics include: the self, identity, social construction of reality, human use of symbols, cognitive and social structure, ambiguity and conflict in social interaction. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: ANTH 201 or GEOG 202 or PSY 102 or SOC 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. (3)

PSY 412. Psychopathology. A number of mental disorders are examined in this course. Although the emphasis is on learning about psychopathology, related topics also receive attention. For example, theories, which have contributed to our understanding of personality will be examined, assessment techniques will be reviewed and methods of investigating psychopathology will be explored. Prerequisite: PSY

102. (3)

PSY 420. Diagnostics and Evaluation. Relationship of assessments/evaluation to making responsible and scientific diagnosis and subsequently developing corresponding treatment plans is stressed in this course. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual clinical syndromes are explored as are measures used in assessments and evaluations. Statistics relevant to test assessments, reliability and validity will be examined. Prerequisite: PSY 102. (3)

PSY 425.Theories of Personality. Presents the major theories of personality from Freud to more contemporary figures. Personality assessment is stressed as well as the relationship of these measures to other areas of psychology including industrial/ organizational psychology, employment assistance programs, marriage & the family, and clinical/counseling/ school psychology. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: PSY

102. (3)

PSY 430. Psychology of Gender. Review of research findings on sex differences between males and females. These findings will be used in discussions and student activities concerning areas where differences between males and females are found. Prerequisite: PSY 102. (3)

PSY 435. Human Motivation. Examination of different biological, social, learning, and cognitive approaches to the topic of motivation. Key theories of motivation will be reviewed and applied. Contemporary issues will be analyzed from a motivational perspective. Prerequisite: PSY 102. (3)

PSY 480. Psychology Workshop. Treatment of current theory and practice. (1-3)

PSY 481. Internship in Psychology. 135 contact hours (per 3 semesters) in the community. Student's work will relate to psychology. The first internship cannot exceed 135 hrs/3 semesters. A weekly seminar addresses psychological issues and allows students to process their internship experience. (3-9)

PSY 496. Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences. A capstone experience for majors and/or minors in the Social Sciences. It brings together critical thinking, research, and communication skills in an interdisciplinary context. A major research project is an important component of this course. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: declared major or minor in one of the Social Science disciplines, Junior or Senior status and must have completed at least 21 hours (for majors) or 15 hours (for minors). (3)

Reading Education

RDG 137. Reading Literacy. This course will focus on the learners working with both children and parents. The learners will attend a scheduled class for the academic theoretical base of knowledge, and will work at a public school with children and parents for the application phase. (3)

RDG 410. The Teaching of Reading. This course will provide an exploration of specialized techniques and materials for the teaching of reading in the elementary school and will provide an understanding of the nature of the developmental reading process. Field experience is required. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: EDUC 311, Admission to Teacher Education Program, and permission of the instructor. (3)

RDG 411. Corrective Reading Instruction. This course will provide diagnostic and instructional techniques for teaching children with reading problems in the regular classroom. Field experience is required. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: RDG 410 with a grade of “C” or better and permission of the instructor. (3)

RDG 412. Diagnosis and Prescription of Reading for Diverse Learners. This course identifies theoretical and practical aspects of using formal and informal diagnostic procedures; selecting appropriate test batteries, prescribing instructional materials, and using appropriate teaching techniques based upon individual diagnosis will be emphasized. Writing Intensive. Permission of the instructor required. (3)

RDG 437. Literacy: Teaching Applications. This course will utilize a multi-disciplinary approach of theoretical nature with application of information during the tutoring sessions. Academic counterpart will explore the economical, the political, the sociological, and the moral issues facing society; 60 hours field experience required. Writing Intensive. (3)

RDG 453. Children’s Literature. This course will provide an exploration of the methods and materials/trade books for elementary and middle school teaching and includes a survey of different types of literature for children. Special attention is given to the establishment of desirable reading habits and life long learning; includes field experience. Writing Intensive. (3)

RDG 460. Reading Skills in Secondary Education. The reading process in the various content areas generally offered in the public secondary school will be addressed; includes an investigation of methods and procedures for assisting students in the improvement of reading and study skills in the content areas and includes field experience. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: EDUC 311 and Admission to Teacher Education Program. (3)

Rehabilitation Services

RHAB 310. Introduction to Rehabilitation. Provides an introduction to the field of Rehabilitation by presenting information related to the history and development of the field, legal and legislative aspects of Rehabilitation, the role and function of the Rehabilitationist, current practices and trends in Rehabilitation, and general knowledge regarding conditions that are typically served by the discipline of Rehabilitation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Rehabilitation Program or permission of the instructor. (3)

RHAB 320. Physical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disability. Provides a survey of the physical and psychological aspects of disability. Major disabilities that impact physical, cognitive and psychiatric functions are explored. Essential medication information, medical terminology, etiology, prognosis, treatment procedures, and vocation and independent living implications will be covered for each major disability group.The adjustment process that consumers and their families experience is also addressed. Prerequisite: Completion of RHAB 310 with a C or better or permission of the instructor. (3)

RHAB 321. Field Experience in Rehabilitation 1. This first field experience for the Rehabilitation student will provide an opportunity to observe a variety of settings where individuals receive rehabilitation services. The student will spend a minimum of 45 hours in four clinical settings under the supervision of agency employees. Clinical settings will represent areas where rehabilitation professionals typically are employed. Experiences will be shared with peers in regularly scheduled seminar meetings. (1)

RHAB 322. Employment for People with Disabilities. Provides an introduction to the area of job development for people with disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on a systematic method of identifying and procuring competitive employment, marketing these services to employers, job analysis, consumer assessment, job accommodations, and job matching. Prerequisite: RHAB 310. (3)

RHAB 340. Medical Terminology and Documentation in Occupational Therapy.

Introductory course in basic medical terminology used in many areas of health sciences; various types of documentation used in the rehabilitation field including SOAP format, narrative note writing, evaluation and re-evaluation reports, treatment, progress and discharge notes, as well as APA format for use in manuscript writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. (3)

RHAB 370. Communications for Health and Human Services Providers.

Provides an overview of the major communication methods used by health and human services providers. Included are interpersonal communication skills, therapeutic communication skills, documentation, report writing, business communications, writing research papers, and grant writing. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 and RHAB 310. (3)

RHAB 410. Assistive Technology in Rehabilitation. Applications of technology to assist people with disabilities to become more fully integrated in all aspects of life. An emphasis will be placed on examining assistive technology as used in vocational, educational, and independent living. In addition to providing information on assistive technology principles as procedures, the course will focus on commercially available aids and devices as well as the problem solving process related to persons with disabilities. (3)

RHAB 411. Field Experience in Rehabilitation 2. This second field experience for the Rehabilitative student will provide an opportunity to observe a variety of settings where individuals receive rehabilitation services. The student will spend a minimum of 45 hours in four clinical settings under the supervision of agency employees. Student will be assigned to agencies in which rehabilitation professionals, including rehabilitation counselors, are employed. Field trips to sites in Arizona, New Mexico and Texas will be required. Experiences will be shared with peers in regularly scheduled seminar meetings. (1)

RHAB 420. Case Management in Rehabilitation. Focuses on the development of interviewing, intervention, case recording, and caseload management skills critical for case history development program planning and goal accomplishment within the rehabilitation process. These concepts are applied through supervised laboratory experiences. Analysis of the Individualized Written Rehabilitation Plan and review of client class records will be treated with particular emphasis. Legal and ethical issues in service delivery will be discussed. The course is taught through a combination of didactic instruction and structured case study exercises. (3)

RHAB 481. Practicum in Rehabilitation. This course is the final field experience in the Rehabilitation Program. The student will be assigned to a full time work setting in which they will perform the duties of the rehabilitation professional. Supervision will be provided by agency employees in concert with WNMU faculty. A minimum of 600 hours work is required for successful completion of this class. (6)

Sociology

SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology. Acquaints students with the discipline of sociology by focusing on sociological concepts, methods, theories, and areas of substantive concern such as deviance, class, race, gender, politics, medicine, and education. Students are asked to employ the sociological perspective as they think critically about the social world around them. (NMCCN SOCI 1113) (Area IV). (3)

SOC 102. Social Problems. Introduces students to key sociological concepts and theoretical perspectives in the study of social problems, focusing on the United States. Topics include crime, social inequalities, education, family, environment, drug abuse, and health care. Possible solutions to social problems will also be explored. (NMCCN SOCI 2113) (Area IV). (3)

SOC 240. Sociology of Education. A study of sociological contributions dealing

with the social institution of education in the U.S. (3) SOC 259. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity. A theoretical and practical analysis of the problems encountered by racial, ethnic, and other minority groups in the U.S.; includes the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the social culture mechanisms that tend to perpetuate racism. (3)

SOC 260. Sociology of Marriage and the Family. Introduces students to the theoretical perspectives and research methods used in the study of intimate relationships and family as a social institution. Emphasizes the social and historical factors that bring about change in family-related behaviors, and create a diversity of family forms

Prerequisite: ANTH 201, GEOG 202, PSY 102, SOC 101, or SOC 102 or permission

of the instructor. (NMCCN SOCI 2213). (3) SOC/GEOG/HIST/POLS/PSY 297. Logic & Methods in the Social Sciences. An introduction to the logic and methods used in the social sciences with an emphasis on exposure to the components of research and scholarly literature. Prerequisite: ANTH 201, GEOG 202, HIST 111, POLS 201, PSY 102, SOC 101 or SOC 102. (1)

SOC/GEOG 300. Older Women’s Issues. An interdisciplinary examination of the

social, economic, and health issues facing older women in the United States. (3) SOC 302. Research Methods. Methods and applications of social research; the study of research methods in sociology and the social sciences and the application of these methods to studying human social life. Writing Intensive. (3)

SOC 313. Social Inequality. Introduces students to class, racial, gender, and sexual inequality in the United Sates. This course uses a sociological lens to examine how social stratification occurs and is reproduced and specifically addresses the social construction of inequality, classism, racism, sexism and homophobia. Prerequisite. ANTH 201 or PSY 102 or SOC 101 or 102 or GEOG 202 or POLS 201, or permission of the instructor. (3).

SOC/GEOG 323. Social Statistics. An introduction to the application of statistical techniques for social sciences; use of computers to aid in statistical problem-solving. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: GEOG 202 or PSY 102 or SOC 101, and MATH

111. Fall only. (3) SOC 331. Introduction to Criminology. A sociological examination of crime and criminal behavior. The course includes analysis and critical assessments of tradi

tional and contemporary theories of crime. Prerequisite: CJUS 111 or SOC 101 or 102 or PSY 102 or permission of the instructor. (3) SOC 333. Sociology of Youth. Adolescents and young adults in American society;

their social roles, relationships, and problems. (3) SOC/GEOG 342. Social Geography. Social relationships are rooted in places and spaces that, in turn, profoundly influence how people interact with one another. This course explores the linkages between social relationships and geography through

the study of such issues as class, race, gender, ethnicity, and age. Prerequisite: successful completion of at least one other course in GEOG or SOC. (3) SOC 352. Sociology of Gender. An examination of gender and gender inequality

in the U.S. with additional focus on the intersection of gender with race, social class, and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102, or ANTH 201 or GEOG 202 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 391. Sociological Theory. Introduces students to the theorists and theoretical schools that undergird sociological practice. Students will engage classical, modern and contemporary theorists in both a critical and creative way. Writing Intensive.

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102 or PSY 102 or ANTH 201 or GEOG 202, or permis

sion of the instructor. (3) SOC/GEOG 400. Population Analysis. Study of population size, composition, and distribution as well as basic concepts and techniques used to analyze populations; involves data manipulation, analysis, and case studies from around the world. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or GEOG 202. (3)

SOC/PSY 401. Comparative Multicultural Social Studies. Hands-on experience with Mexican, Mexican-American, American Indian and rural Anglo cultures. Particular focus is placed on human and social services, education and agency approaches toward mental and physical health as well as legal issues. The academic perspective involves social psychology, clinical, counseling and educational frameworks. Individual, group and inter-group interactions are explored. The course involves an intense week-long exploration of the various cultures explored in the course. Interaction with college students from other areas in the U.S. is part of the experience offered by this course. Prerequisites: SOC 101 for Sociology Majors, PSY 101 for Psychology Majors; and permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC/PSY 406. Social Psychology. Introduction to social psychology from a symbolic interaction perspective. The course focuses on how humans make sense of and interpret their social world and react to the symbolic meanings attached to social life. Topics include: the self, identity, social construction of reality, human use of symbols, cognitive and social structure, ambiguity and conflict in social interaction. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: ANTH 201 or GEOG 202 or PSY 102 or SOC 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 410. Sociology of the Movies. A critical, scientific look at the movies to determine their relationship to the social environment and their relevance. (3)

SOC 420. Sociology of Aging. Focuses on the sociological aspects of aging. Topics include: aging as socialization process, the demography of aging, and the status of elders in the social institutions of family, economy, health care, and polity. How the growing number of elderly in the United States impacts social institutions will be explored. Prerequisite: ANTH 201 or GEOG 202 or PSY 102 or SOC 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 445. Sociology of Sports. Examines the relationship of sport to American culture. Topics include children, schools, deviance, violence, gender relations group relations, economy and media as they relate to sports. (3)

SOC 450. Environmental Sociology. Investigates the societal causes and cures of environmental deterioration. We will examine population, water, pollution, toxic racism, global climate change, energy, politics, globalization , environmental movements, and sustainable development. Students in this course are asked to think critically about societal impact on the environment and social inequality and the environment. Prerequisite: ANTH 201 or GEOG 202 or POLS 201 or PSY 102 or SOC 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 460. Social Movements/Social Change. Examines social movements and social change from a theoretical perspective. The goal is to understand the process of social movement emergence, development and outcomes. We will ask such questions as why movements emerge, who joins or supports movements, how are movements organized, what tactics do movements use, and what do movements accomplish? Prerequisite: ANTH 201 or GEOG 202 or HIST 111 or 112 or POLS 201 or PSY 102 or SOC 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 470. Sociology of Religion. A sociological examination of religion asking such questions as: How has religion influenced society? How has society influenced religion? Why do people participate in religion? Includes both classical and contemporary work. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102 or PSY 102 or ANTH 201 or GEOG 202 or HIST 111 or permission of the instructor (3)

SOC 477. Sociology of Health, Healing and Illness. Provides students with sociological perspectives on the fields of health and medicine. Topics include: the relationship between sociology and health/health care, traditional healing and the rise of scientific medicine, social and physical environmental impacts on health, health care practitioners and their relationships with patients and each other, and health care policy. Prerequisite: ANTH 201 or PSY 102 or SOC 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SOC 481. Internship in Sociology. Provides the student with work experience in the outside world; allows the student to apply the knowledge gained in the classroom; controlled by faculty of that discipline and supervised by an approved agency. (1-6)

SOC 496. Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences. A capstone experience for majors and/or minors in the Social Sciences. It brings together critical thinking, research and communication skills in an interdisciplinary context. A major research project is an important component of this course. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: declared major or minor in one of the Social Science disciplines, Junior or Senior status and must have completed at least 21 hours (for majors) or 15 hours (for minors). (3)

Social Work

SWK 101. Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work. Provides a historical overview of the profession of social work, social welfare activities, programs, and institutional structures that have developed to address social problems with diverse populations-at-risk that utilize social work services. (3)

SWK 300. Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (HBSE I). The first of a two-semester sequence designed to introduce and integrate theories and knowledge of human biol-psycho-social development. The class focuses on the individual. Using a person-in-environment framework, we study behavior in the context of the family existing in a wider environment. Issues of differences in development grounded in class, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation are addressed. Prerequisites: SWK 101, MVSC 240/242 or BIOL 101/103 and 102/104, SOC 101 and PSY 102. (3)

SWK 301. Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (HBSE II). Covers the larger systems that are the setting for social work practice. The class will study the dynamics and stages of family and group development, social networks, organizations, and communities from a rural, social work practitioner’s perspective. Prerequisite: SWK 300. (3)

SWK 320. Diversity in Social Work Practice. The focus is on diversity sensitive practice: racially aware practice, the impact of gender, sexual orientation, and disability on ethical social work practice. Class is designed to increase student awareness of the mechanism and effects of discrimination upon populations-at-risk. Prerequisite: SWK 101 or permission of the Program Director. (3)

SWK 331. Social Welfare Policy I. Provides a historical review of the forces and laws that have impacted the development of social welfare policy, programs, and services to diverse and marginalized groups in our society. By understanding the history, mission, and philosophy of social work within this milieu, skills for implementing policy formation will be emphasized. Class will focus on problem generation, solution formation, policy persuasion, and implementation of policy at all levels of society paying attention to populations-at-risk who have difficulty achieving social and economic justice. Prerequisite: SWK 101. (3)

SWK/CJUS 370. Child Welfare. Familiarizes the student with issues, policies, procedures, basic competencies, and proficiencies pertaining to child welfare and permanency planning. It provides an overview of child abuse and neglect, family preservation and reunification, out-of-home placements, and the consequences of long-term maltreatment. (3)

SWK 386. Social Work Practice I. The first course in a three-course practice sequence utilizing the generalist practice perspective. It introduces the student to assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, termination, case-management, and brokering in local and international settings. Primary objective of the course is to prepare students to engage in culturally-competent practice with individuals and families. Prerequisites: SWK 300, 331. (3)

SWK 422. Social Welfare Policy II. Focuses on analyzing and understanding the background, environment, and actors involved in the generation of social welfare policy with diverse communities and populations-at-risk. Appropriate policy practice skills necessary to enable clients to achieve social and economic justice, at all levels of society, to influence social welfare policy outcomes, taking into account the mission, philosophy, and values of social work are taught. Prerequisite: POLS 201, SWK 331. (3)

SWK 460. Social Work Research Methods. Provides students the opportunity to become competent and proficient consumers and producers of social work knowledge by acquiring and participating in the research process. Class includes fundamental elements of critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and research methods encompassing a variety of research methodologies. Learning is subsequently deepened through class participation in a research project done in the field placement setting. Prerequisite: MATH 321. (3)

SWK 461. Social Work Research Project. The second course in the research sequence provides students the skills necessary to develop a research project in their field placement. Class focuses on selection of appropriate social work research design, questionnaire construction, sampling, data entry and analysis with a heavy emphasis on writing reports incorporating statistical results in an understandable format. Prerequisite: SWK 460. (2)

SWK 487. Social Work Practice II. The second in the three-course sequence, this course builds on SWK 386 by introducing students to various intervention skills to be used with therapeutic and task groups with attention focused on culturally-competent practice. Theories and principles of group structure, dynamics, and process in therapeutic and task settings will be covered. Prerequisite: SWK 386. (3)

SWK 488. Social Work Practice III. The third in the three-course sequence, builds on the skills presented in Practice I and II, applying the generalist practice perspective to interventions with communities and organizations addressing social, economic and sustainable development needs of populations-at-risk. The focus is on program and practice evaluation, with an emphasis on social work values, and will integrate research methods into the professional world of practice. Skills learned will help prepare the student for supervisory and managerial positions within the agency arena and are integrated with actual practice experience through the SWK 491 and SWK 492. Prerequisite: SWK 487. (3)

SWK 491. Social Work Field Placement Seminar I. Integrates knowledge from theory and practice, utilizing the experiences of the students in their field placements. Taken jointly with SWK 492 - Social Work Field Placement I. This course is open to Social Work majors only. (1)

SWK 492. Social Work Field Placement I. Part one of a two-semester practicum which provides supervised, generalist social work experience in a rural community within social service organizations. It emphasizes application of social work values, ethics, theory, skills, and evaluation to social work with individuals, families, groups, social networks, organizations, and communities using a person-in-environment framework with special emphasis on diverse populations-at-risk. Student is required to complete 20 hours per week, equaling 270 hours per semester. Open to Social Work majors only. Prerequisites: SWK 300, 320, 386. (6)

SWK 498. Social Work Field Placement Seminar II. Continuation of SWK 491 - Social Work Field Placement Seminar I. The student continues to integrate knowledge from theory and practice, utilizing their experiences in the field placements. Taken jointly with SWK 499 - Social Work Field Placement II. Open to Social Work majors only. (1)

SWK 499. Social Work Field Placement II. Continuation of SWK 492 - Social Work Field Placement I. The student continues to participate in supervised, generalist social work practice. Student is required to complete 20 hours per week, equaling 270 hours per semester. Open to Social Work majors only. Prerequisites: SWK 491 and 492. (6)

Spanish

SPAN 101. Beginning Spanish I. For non-native speakers of Spanish; aural-oral training in the basic speech patterns with stress on the acquisition of comprehension and oral skill; not open to Spanish-speaking students except by consent of instructor; meets three times a week. (NMCCN SPAN 1113). (3)

SPAN 102. Beginning Spanish II. Continuation of SPAN 101 for non-native speakers; not open to Spanish-speaking students except by consent of instructor; meets three times a week. (NMCCN SPAN 1123). (3)

SPAN 151. Beginning Conversational Spanish I. For non-native speakers of Spanish; simple conversation, designed primarily to give students extra practice in the oral use of the language; not open to Spanish-speaking students except by consent of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 152. Beginning Conversational Spanish II. For non-native speakers of Spanish; special topics for conversational and continued use of the language; not open to Spanish-speaking students except by consent of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I. Review of the essentials of vocabulary and grammatical construction with some emphasis on composition. Prerequisites: SPAN 101, 102, two years of high school Spanish, or permission of the instructor. (NMCCN SPAN 201). (3)

SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II. Extensive readings of contemporary Spanish with an introduction to Spanish literature. Prerequisites: 201, or two years of high school Spanish, or permission of the instructor. (NMCCN SPAN 2143). (3)

SPAN 213. Spanish for Heritage Speakers I. For Southwest Spanish speakers who have had little or no previous exposure to written Spanish; emphasis on vocabulary-building through cultural readings. Prerequisite: Background knowledge in Spanish. (3)

SPAN 214. Spanish for Heritage Speakers II. Particularly designed for those students interested in gaining knowledge of correctly written Spanish. Highly recommended for students seeking a bilingual endorsement. Prerequisite: SPAN 213 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 251. Intermediate Conversational Spanish I. Development of fluency in spoken Spanish; a review of grammatical patterns. Prerequisites: SPAN 102 or 152 or permission of the instructor (3)

SPAN 252. Intermediate Conversational Spanish II. Designed to increase vocabulary; a review of grammatical patterns leading the student to linguistic skills necessary for natural conversation and the use of the language as an oral means of communication. Prerequisites: SPAN 201, 213, or 251. (3)

SPAN 301. Survey of Spanish Literature I. Spanish literature from its origins to the Golden Age. Prerequisites: SPAN 202, 214, 252 or permission of the instructor (3)

SPAN 302. Survey of Spanish Literature II. A study of Spanish literature of the Golden Age. Prerequisites: SPAN 202, 214, 252 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 303. Hispanic Culture. Intermediate-level reading covering the major aspects of Hispanic civilization — history, art, and literature — and its influence on western civilization, its role in the development of European culture in Latin America, and its fusion with the various indigenous cultures. Prerequisites: SPAN 202, 214, 252 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 308. Advanced Grammar and Composition. An extensive review of points of grammar, syntax and diacritical notation combined with extensive practice of writing descriptive and narrative prose. Required for students seeking New Mexico Teacher Licensure in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202, 214, 252 or permission of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 350. Chicano Literature. A survey of the literature of the Mexican-American from 1959 to the present. (3)

SPAN 410. Survey of Spanish-American Literature I. Spanish-American literature from the pre-colonial period to 1888; study of first chroniclers, colonial period, patriotic writers of independence, romanticism. Prerequisites: Any 300 level SPAN or permission of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 411. Survey of Spanish-American Literature II. Spanish-American literature from 1888 to the present day; modernism, the essay, contemporary fiction and poetry. Prerequisite: Any 300 level SPAN or permission of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 423. Spanish Phonetics. A linguistic analysis of the articulatory sound system of the Spanish language and its relationship to the orthography, morphology and syntax of the language. Prerequisites: Intermediate level Spanish with a grade of "C" or better and permission of the instructor. SPAN 308 recommended. (3)

SPAN 424. Teaching Methods in Spanish II. Designed to acquaint the student with specialized techniques of teaching Spanish language skills in the secondary schools. Prerequisite: Proficiency in Spanish. (3)

SPAN 425. Applied Linguistics for the Spanish Teacher. Introduction to Spanish phonetics and phonemics; a descriptive analysis of grammatical and semantic structure of contemporary Spanish applied to problems of teaching. Prerequisites: Intermediate level Spanish with a grade of "C" or better and permission of the instructor. SPAN 308 recommended. (3)

SPAN 426. Practicum in the Teaching of Spanish. Supervised practice in tutoring and teaching grammatical concepts as an assistant to a faculty member teaching

SPAN 101, 102, 151, 152; may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Spanish and permission of the instructor. (3)

SPAN 430. Content Area Spanish. This course is specifically designed for prospective or already practicing bilingual teachers and is meant to provide a means for increasing vocabulary in Spanish in order to be able to teach different subject areas in the language. Students will be exposed to terminology in Spanish which is used in education, psychology, science, mathematics, language arts, social studies, health, art and music. Prerequisite: Proficiency in Spanish. (3)

SPAN 435. Intensive Spanish Language Development. This course is designed to prepare prospective bilingual teachers for the Four Skills Exam required for endorsement in the state of New Mexico and at the same time give them language skills which will make them more effective as bilingual teachers. To accomplish this, students work on grammar, comprehension, speaking, reading and writing exercises and are expected to use only formal Spanish during class time. Prerequisite: Proficiency in Spanish. (3)

SPAN 485. Directed Study in Special Topics; Permission of instructor required. May

be repeated for credit. (3) a. Novel of the Mexican Revolution b. Spanish Romanticism. c. Spanish Poetry d. Cervantes e. Advanced Composition f. g. h. i. Spanish-American Novel Modern Spanish Drama Hispanic Culture Hispanic Thought
Special Education

SPED 408. Introduction to Exceptional Children. An introduction to the various exceptionalities, procedures and processes of identifying and placing children with special needs into special remedial or accelerated programs, and of staffing those programs; emphasizes New Mexico programs, standards and guidelines, as well as issues presented in IDEA, and other state and federal mandates. (3)

SPED 428. Curriculum and Methods in Special Education. Provides teachers of students with disabilities with basic background in methods, materials, IEP, and curriculum development; emphasizes the analysis and selection of curricula, instructional methods, and the use of materials in the educational process for children with disabilities; 30 hours of field work are required during this course. Writing Intensive.

Prerequisites: SPED 408, EDUC 311 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. (3)

SPED 441. Practice Teaching - Special Education. One semester of supervised classroom experience as a practice teacher in a public school; involves a full time assignment of one academic semester with licensed educational personnel supervision. Attendance of a weekly methods seminar is also a course requirement. Seminars will emphasize teaching methods, behavioral management, ethics, multiculturalism, and tutoring/coaching. Micro-teaching exercises will be used to enhance teaching skills. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: Permission required. Can be taken concurrently with SPED 451. All core/professional courses must be taken prior to Practice Teaching. (9)

SPED 451. Behavioral Management Approaches with Exceptional Children.

Emphasizes the use of behavior management strategies for children with special needs. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: SPED 428. Can be taken concurrently with SPED 441. Offered Fall and alternate summers. (3)

SPED 452. Families, School, Community Relations and the Exceptional Child.

Prepares special education teachers to work effectively with the parents of children with special needs by providing information on a variety of issues dealing with parent-teacher relationships. Some of the issues are: value clarification, conferencing skills, assertiveness training, problem solving, establishing open communications, working with community agencies, discipline and legality. Offered Spring and alternate summers. Writing Intensive. (3)

SPED 454. Evaluation and Assessment of Exceptional Children. Familiarize special education teachers with the field of assessment, including methods, diagnostic instruments, and techniques for evaluating exceptional children. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: SPED 428. (3)

SPED 456. Culturally Diverse Exceptional Children. Theory and practice in bilingual/multicultural special education, with emphasis on language culture, assessment practices, and learning styles of exceptional bilingual children. Offered Fall and alternate summers. Writing Intensive. (3)

SPED 469. Nature and Needs of Persons with Mental Retardation. Course is designed to assist teachers in understanding the nature of mental retardation from an interdisciplinary perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the educational significance of different theoretical perspectives as they relate to the intellectually disabled. Summers only. Writing Intensive. (3)

SPED 470. Nature and Needs of Persons with Learning Disabilities. This course provides teachers with information which will assist them to understand the nature of learning disabilities from an interdisciplinary perspective. The focus will be on the identification, characteristics, and education of children with learning disabilities. Offered Fall and alternate summers. Writing Intensive. (3)

SPED 476. Nature and Needs of Persons with Emotional & Behavior Disorders.

This course provides teachers with information which will assist them to understand the nature of behavior disorders from an interdisciplinary perspective. The focus will be on the identification, characteristics, and education of children identified as emotionally disturbed. Offered Spring and alternate summers. Writing Intensive. (3)

Theater

THR 110. Theater/Drama Appreciation. Designed to expose the student to the physical, spiritual, political and psychological roots of theater and drama, ancient and contemporary, studied through selected plays, theater forms, readings and activity. (NMCCN THTR 1113)(Area V). (3)

THR 111. Introduction to Acting. An initial course for the beginning student with no prior formal training in acting; emphasis on gaining self-awareness, relaxation, and freedom of self on stage; work encompasses theater games, voice and body exercises, improvisations, and selected scene work. An evening class performance is required. (3)

THR 136. Introduction to Theater Production. Introduction to the various aspects of play production, including set construction, lighting, costuming and stage management, through class participation in play production. (NMCCN THTR 1013). (3)

THR 211. Acting I. Continuation of THR 111 Introduction to Acting. Emphasis on acting techniques in the creation of a role. Students are expected to audition for at least one theater production and to perform in a final class production. Prerequisite: THR 111 or permission of the instructor. (3)

THR 212.Theater Production I - Backstage. Includes theory, design, history, and construction of costumes, scenery and lighting. Prerequisite: THR 136 or permission of the instructor. (3)

THR 215. Rehearsal and Performance. Cast and crews directly involved in university production for credit. May be repeated twice toward graduation, more often for non-graduate credit (may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours). (3)

THR 250. Storytelling. A course that investigates the techniques of the art of telling stories from the Classical, Native American and Folkloric traditions. Students research, analyze, and perform stories from a variety of sources. A performance evening is required. (3)

THR 310. The Art of Watching Films. By concise introductions, film screening, class discussions and critical analysis, this course provides a series of models of great acting, directing, and design performances on film for the benefit of students interested in performance and technique of cinematic art. (3)

THR 311. Acting II. Emphasis on scene work in plays from classic to contemporary. A performance final is required. Prerequisite: THR 211 or permission of the instructor. (3)

THR 325. Classroom Theater. A study of methods which use theatrical technique to reinforce classroom instruction; workshop in creative dramatics; theory and practice in selecting, adapting, and staging plays for children. Prerequisite: at least one semester of THR 136. (3)

THR 336. Playwriting. Analysis of and writing in the play form; reading in dramatic literature and criticism to provide interpretive and analytical background. Class readings aid the playwright in achieving confidence and accuracy in dialogue and development of dramatic action. Prerequisite: THR 110. (3)

THR 386. History of the Theater. A historical survey of theater and drama from ancient times to today. Various cultures and traditions are integrated. Prerequisite: THR 110. (3)

THR 414. Play Direction. A basic directing course designed to explore and make use of the elements of directing through lectures, discussion, and practical work. Each student will direct scenes for presentation before a live audience as a final project. Prerequisites: THR 110, THR 211 and permission of the instructor. (3)

THR 450. Secondary Teaching Methods. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status and permission of the instructor. (3)

Welding Technology

WLDT 105. Oxyacetylene Welding. Introduction to metal preparation, joint alignment, oxyacetylene welding and brazing. Lecture with lab. (2)

WLDT 120. General Welding Applications. Basic introduction to welding math, blueprint reading, welding symbols and welding detail drawings. (3)

WLDT 122. Basic Safety, Hand & Power Tools. Safety concept illustration of the use of basic hand and power tools powered by electricity, batteries and pressurized air. (2)

WLDT 131. Metal Cutting Process. Explains safety for plasma, air carbon and oxyfuel cutting, equipment setup and procedures. Lecture with lab. (2)

WLDT 140. Rigging and Metal Properties. Covers rigging techniques and practices. Explains physical characteristics, mechanical properties, composition, and classifications of common and non-ferrous metals. Describes procedures for gas metal, arc welding (GMAW), and flux cored arc welding (FCAW). (3)

WLDT 155. Shielded Metal Arc Welding I. Equipment and set up, electrode and selection, bead and fillet welds. Flat-overhead, horizontal-vertical. Lecture with lab (3)

WLDT 157. Shielded Metal Arc Welding II. Advanced shielded arc welding to include vertical and horizontal welding, and improvement of quality workmanship. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: WLDT 155. (3)

WLDT 158. SMAW I Groove & Open V-Butt Welds. Explains and demonstrates groove welds with backing and open V-butt welds. Procedures for making flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead welds. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: WLDT 155. (4)

WLDT 162. SMAW I Open Root Pipe & Stainless Steel. Explains open root pipe welds and provides procedures for making 1G, 2G, 5G, 6G pipe welds and stainless steel groove welds. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: WLDT 155. (4)

WLDT 166. Tig Welding. Explains gas tungsten arc welding, covers open groove welds with carbon steel filler metal. Lecture with lab. (3)

WLDT 181. Internship in Welding. (3).

WLDT 202. SMAW II Groove & Open V-Butt Welds. Advanced explanation and demonstration of groove welds and open V-butt welds. Procedures for making flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead welds. Lecture with lab. (3)

WLDT 204. SMAW II Open Root Pipe & Stainless Steel. Advanced explanation of open-root pipe welds and procedures for making 1G, 2G, 5G, 6G pipe welds and stainless steel groov welds. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: WLDT 155. (2)

WLDT 206. Mechanical Properties of Low Alloy Steel I. Identifies the mechanical properties of low alloy steels and the joint preparation required. Describes how to make GTAW open-root V-groove welds with low allow steel filler metal in the 2G, 5G, and 6G positions. Lecture with lab. (3)

WLDT 208. GTAW Aluminum Plate & Pipe I. Identifies and explains aluminum, metallurgy and the characteristics of aluminum plate and pipe. Explains how to weld aluminum and build a pad of stringer beads and weave beads using GTAW filler metals and shielding gas. Lecture with lab. (3)

WLDT 210. GMAW Aluminum Plate & Pipe I. Explains how to build a pad of stringer beads and weave beads using aluminum filter metals and shielding gas. Lecture with lab. (3)

WLDT 212. GMAW Plate & Pipe. Explains how to set up equipment and build a pad of stringer beads, weave beads and identifies open root V-groove pipe welds. Lecture with lab. (4)

WLDT 255. Carbon & Stainless Steel Pipe Welding. Procedures for welding on carbon steel pipe, stainless steel pipe and stainless steel metallurgy. Lecture with llab. (5)

WLDT 257. Mechanical Properties of Low Alloy Steel II. Identifies advanced mechanical properties of low alloy steels and the joint preparation required. Describes how to make GTAW open-root V-groove welds with low alloy steel filler metal in the 2G, 5G, and 6G positions. Lecture with lab. (2)

WLDT 260. FCAW Plate & Pipe. Explains how to set up equipment and build a pad of stringer beads, weave beads and identifies open-root v-groove pipe welds. Lecture with lab. (4)

WLDT 265. GTAW Aluminum Plate & Pipe II. Advanced explanation of aluminum, metallurgy and the characteristics of aluminum plate and pipe. Explains how to weld aluminum and build a pad of stringer beads and weaver beads using GTAW filler metals and shielding gas. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: WLDT 208. (2)

WLDT 267. GMAW Aluminum Plate & Pipe II. Advanced explanation of how to build a pad of stringer beads and weave beads using aluminum filler metals and shielding gas. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: WLDT 210. (2)

Wellness

WELL 162. Personal and Community Wellness Education. Major areas of wellness information needed for intelligent decision-making about health, including consumer behavior in relation to personal practices and attitudes; the use of community resources to promote and maintain health, chronic diseases and diseases and disorders; physical fitness and ecology. (3)

WELL 200. Early Childhood Nutrition. Nutrition as it pertains to growth, development and total well-being of young children; emphasizes federal food program requirements. (3) WELL 262. Introduction to Wellness Education. Philosophical foundations, expectations, and opportunities for service within the health education profession. (3)

WELL 300. Nutrition/Diet Therapy. A state of optimum health requires a diet that contains adequate amounts of necessary nutrients. This course will present principles of nutrition through the study of human metabolism. Emphasis will be on the constraints placed on an individual with certain disease states. The course will include information about the role of diet as a therapeutic modality and the importance of assisting patients to modify diets. Prerequisites: CHEM 121/123 and BIOL 255/257. (3)

WELL 350. Wellness Programming and Program Management. Introduces the student to the application of basic business management principles to a wide variety of health promotion programs. (3)

WELL 361. Introduction to Community Wellness. Various components of community health education programs and the means to develop a content base for utilization of the programs. (3) WELL 362. Curriculum in Wellness Education. General curriculum models and basic principles of curriculum development; specific planning of sequential and comprehensive wellness curricula. (3)

WELL 450. Wellness Education Methods and Materials. Teaching orientation with emphasis on observation, planning, classroom practices and strategies; study of instructional problems and their resolution. (3)

WELL 460. Wellness Program Planning and Evaluation. Grantsmanship skills as they pertain to health education; includes a demonstration of these skills in the development of a mock grant proposal as the final project at the end of the course. (3)

WELL 464. Substance Use/Abuse. Basic information about various drugs, their physiological action on the body, and psychological effects. (3) WELL 465. Wellness of the Senior Population. A study of gerontology with emphasis on the physical, mental, and social health of the aged, and a survey of existing community agencies that deal in services for the aged. (3)

WELL 470. Human Sexuality. Covers anatomical, physiological, and ethical components related to human sexuality. (3)