academic support center /

ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER

Director: Williams Academic Advisor/Counselors: Cosper-Hughes, Smith

The Academic Support Center is staffed with two professional advisors, one of which is also the test coordinator and one of which is a professional counselor, and faculty who advise part-time in the center. A variety of services are offered, leading to the academic success of WNMU students including academic advising, personal counseling, tutoring, testing services, and other related services.

Academic Advisement

Academic Advising is an integral component of Western New Mexico University. Academic Support Advisors assist students in defining academic goals and career planning. They provide guidance with appropriate class scheduling, so that students can meet their desired goals. Staff also provide instruction in study habits and techniques, time management skills, test anxiety, as well as other areas devoted to student success.

All degree-seeking students are required to see an advisor before pre-registering for classes. The academic progress of a student will determine where advising takes place and who serves as the student's advisor.

New freshmen and transfer students will begin their advisement at the Academic Support Center (room 220) in the Juan Chacon Building. Following is the Policy Regarding Assignment of Advisors. Students in the following categories need to be advised as follows:

Silver City Deming

Undeclared Students Academic Support Center
Students in two year or certificate programs Faculty in Major Departments
All Freshman Students (declared or intended) Academic Support Center
Sophomores with less than 48 hours completed   
(unless they have over a 2.75 GPA and have a Academic Support Center
declared major)   
Sophomores with 32 hours completed plus a 2.75 GPA (and have declared a major) Faculty in Major Departments
Juniors Faculty in Major Departments
Seniors Faculty in Major Departments
Graduate students Faculty in Major Departments
Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree Academic Support Center
Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies (AA) degree Academic Support Center
Undeclared Students Deming Academic Support Center
Students in two year or certificate SC Faculty in Major Departments
programs   
Freshman intended) Students (declared or Deming Academic Support Center
Sophomores with less than 48 hours   
completed (unless they have over a 2.75 Deming Academic Support Center
GPA and have a declared major)   
Sophomores with 32 hours completed   
plus a 2.75 GPA (and have declared a SC Faculty in Major Departments
major)   
Juniors SC Faculty in Major Departments
Seniors SC Faculty in Major Departments
Graduate students SC Faculty in Major Departments
Bachelor degree of General Studies (BGS) SC Academic Support Center
Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies (AA) degree SC Academic Support Center

Truth or Consequences

Undeclared Students Students in two year or certificate programs Freshman Students (declared or intended)

Sophomores with less than 48 hours completed (unless they have over a 2.75 GPA and have a declared major)

Sophomores with 32 hours completed plus a 2.75 GPA Juniors

Seniors Graduate students Bachelor of General Studies (BGS)

degree Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies (AA) degree

T or C Academic Support Center SC Faculty in Major Departments

T or C Academic Support Center

T or C Academic Support Center

SC Faculty in Major Departments

SC Faculty in Major Departments SC Faculty in Major Departments SC Faculty in Major Departments

SC Academic Support Center

SC Academic Support Center academic support center /

Gallup

Other

High School Counselors in coordination

Concurrent High School Students

with Academic Support Center

Students remain in the Academic Support Center until they meet the following requirements:

Declaration of Major

Appropriate faculty or staff in the Academic Support Center will initiate the transfer of the student to a departmental advisor according to the above guidelines lists. Students come to the Academic Support Center and are guided through the process of filling out the “Declaration of Major” form.

The process of transfer includes the following steps:

Academic Tutoring

Any WNMU student is eligible for free tutoring in many subject areas including math, science, business and writing. Demand for subject matter will determine the availability of tutors. This service is offered daily as scheduled each semester, and students may be tutored on a walk-in basis as time allows, or may schedule extended tutoring on an appointment basis based upon a tutor’s availability.

Computer Lab

Computers are available to WNMU students. All computers have internet access and are equipped with integrated software packages. Academic Support Center student employees are generally available for computer assistance.

Counseling Services

Short-term, confidential counseling is available to support students in creating a balanced life. Students can initiate seeing a counselor of may be referred by faculty, staff, friend or family member. Services are available by appointment, or generally on a walk-in basis.

Staff members can provide consultation and crisis intervention and are also available to conduct classroom presentation and workshops on mental health related topics.

Early Alert Program

Instructors are asked to identify students in their classes who may be at risk or are significantly behind others. Refer those students to the Academic Support Center Advisors. Identified students are contacted and, in concert with the professor and student, a plan is developed for the students to regain appropriate progress in the course. Academic Advisors and tutors assist students to improve their class performance and refer students to other appropriate services on campus and in the community. Early Alert forms are found on line on the Western Home Page and be accessed by anyone who determines that a student may benefit by personalized services.

Testing Credit by College-Level Examination ( CLEP)

Students may contact the Academic Support Center to make arrangements to take the examinations available through College Level Examination Placement. Prior registration is required so that testing materials may be ordered. CLEP examinations are not considered hours in residence.

Contact the Academic Support Center for CLEP tests available and corresponding WNMU Courses approved for credit. Western New Mexico University course credit is contingent on departmental approval.

Cost: One Examination, $65.00 payable by check or credit card only. Administrative fee of $20.00 paid at the Business Office.

Students may receive up to 12 transfer credits for the CLEP for equivalent WNMU courses in Spanish (101, 102, 201 and 202).

Credit for additional courses may be approved on a case-by-case basis. A maximum of 32 credit hours may be applied towards a baccalaureate degree.

academic support center /

Placement Testing

COMPASS

The COMPASS is an acronym for Computer Adaptive Placement Assessment and Support System. It is used to place students in appropriate math, reading, and writing classes. All incoming undergraduates (freshmen and transfer students) must take this test unless they have a waiver of the test. COMPASS waivers are determined by the Assistant Director of Admissions or the Director of the Academic Support Center according to the current catalog criteria.

Asset Test

This is the paper version of the COMPASS Test. It is given at both the main campus and campus branches. Four forms accommodate those students with special needs: the hand written version, large font version, Braille version and audio tapes. This test is only administered under special circumstances determined by the Director of the Academic Support Center.

Standardized Testing

The Academic Support Center administers many national standardized tests on campus. These include the General Education Development (GED) test for individuals desiring to earn a high school equivalency degree; the American College Test (ACT); the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT); the Praxis Specialty Area Tests; the College Level Examination Program Computer Based Testing (CLEP-CBT) examinations; and the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC). Other test may be administered by special arrangement.

Credit Through ACT Examination*

WNMU will grant up to 12 credit hours in two areas to persons with appropriate ACT standard scores. ACT scores used for this purpose must have been earned prior to the student’s first enrollment in any college or university. Students who earned college credits while in high school are also eligible.

Credits will be granted in each area in which the following minimum ACT standard scores or percentiles, whichever is higher, are earned:

Test Std. Score Percentile Courses
English 31 98% ENGL 101, 102
Mathematics 31 97% MATH 131 (MATH 132 upon consultation with the Chair of Mathematics
         and Computer Science)

*Students taking the ACT prior to October 1989 must check with the Registrar’s Office for the minimum scores. Credit in any one area may be earned through either ACT or CLEP, but not both. The total number of credits earned may not exceed 32 credit hours and may be in any combination of ACT and CLEP.

Withdrawal From WNMU - Complete

Students who wish to withdraw from ALL of their courses on or after the first day of classes may do so at the Academic Support Center. A grade of “W’’ will be awarded from the third Friday of Fall and Spring semester through the last day of regularly scheduled classes.

When students leave WNMU during a semester and do not withdraw according to the standard withdrawal procedures, they become liable for grades of F in their classes, even though they may be passing their courses at the time of leaving. Such students are responsible for tuition and fees associated with the course or courses. Students must complete the appropriate form in order to withdraw; non-attendance in class does not necessarily result in withdrawal.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Associate Degrees (two-year)

Associate of Arts (A.A.) is a two-year degree. The program requires a minimum of 64 credit hours. This degree is designed for students who plan to pursue a baccalaureate degree at WNMU or elsewhere with minimal loss of credit.

Associate Degree in Nursing (A.D.N.) is a terminal degree in nursing.The program requires 72 credit hours that include the following: (a) nursing courses, and (b) general education support courses. Students who complete the program are eligible to take the licensure examination for Registered Nurses.

Associate of Science (A.S.) is a two-year degree which emphasizes a technical program of study. The program requires 64-74 credit hours that includes the following: (a) vocational courses, (b) technical support courses, and (c) electives. The Associate of Science degree enables a student to transfer to another institution or pursue a higher level degree at WNMU with minimal loss of credit.

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) is a terminal degree with a heavy emphasis on technical courses and practical experience so that the graduate is prepared for technical level positions in the field. The program requires 64-70 credit hours distributed to include (a) vocational coursework, and (b) technical support courses.

Associate Degree Majors and Certificate Programs

Automotive Technology Business Administration Business and Office Technology Computer and Network Technology Construction Technology Criminal Justice Digital Media Communication Drafting and Design Technology Early Childhood Education and Family Support eCommerce and System Administration Educational Assistant Electrical Technology Financial Services Graphic Design Law Enforcement Training (Police Academy) Liberal Studies Nursing Occupational Therapy Assistant Welding Technology

Baccalaureate Degrees (four-year)

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) is traditionally the primary undergraduate degree in higher education. The degree enables a student to widen intellectual horizons, to explore new subjects and deepen insights into old ones, and to find areas of learning where dominant interests lie. During the freshman and sophomore years, a B.A. student is expected to complete the foundations of a liberal education by studying a foreign language.

During junior and senior years, the student is expected to think constructively about a major field and attain some measure of competence. Meanwhile, elective courses are taken to add breadth and depth to the student’s education.

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) like the Bachelor of Arts, is a degree offering a variety of majors and minors, but does not have a foreign language requirement. The B.S. requires an additional six credit hours of mathematics or computer science above those used to meet general education requirements.

Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) will prepare students for careers in technical and professional fields. This degree requires an additional six credit hours of mathematics or computer science above those used to meet general education requirements.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) is a baccalaureate program designed for students who already possess a license to practice as an RN. The student will complete general education requirements and upper division nursing courses. The graduate will be prepared to provide health promotion and health restoration care for individuals, families, and group in a variety of institutional and community settings.

Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) will prepare students for a career in the field of social work. This degree requires that students successfully complete six credit hours in language other than English or its equivalent.

Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) is the undergraduate Business Administration degree. It provides a broad base of liberal education courses, a core of business courses and areas of emphasis in accounting, business management and management information systems. This degree requires six hours of mathematics or computer science above those used to meet general education requirements.

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) is a professional undergraduate program that prepares students as artists to exhibit technical competence in the visual arts. Students learn a broad knowledge of art and art history, sensitivity to style, creative and critical thinking, insight into the role of art in the life of humankind, and the ability to solve problems. Students seeking a BFA degree, enter by special application only. The 84 credit hours in art will provide professional specialization in studio art. Students will be prepared for graduate school to pursue the MFA degree and to practice art professionally.

Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) is an individualized program of study designed to meet a student’s particular needs. The minimum requirements for this degree include the general education core and 54 upper-division credit hours. English 101 and ENGL 102 must be passed with a grade of C or better. This degree reflects a major in General Studies with no minor.

Undergraduate Majors

Accounting Art Biology Botany Business Management Career and Tech Teacher Ed Cell and Molecular Biology

Chemical Dependency Chemistry Computer Science Criminal Justice Early Childhood Education Elementary Education English

Accounting Art Biology Botany Business Administration Chemical Dependency Chemistry Coaching Computer Science Criminal Justice Fine Arts Forest Wildlife Forest Wildlife

Law Enforcement General Science General Studies History Mgmt Info Systems Mathematics Medical Technology Mvmt Sci-Kinesiology Mvmt Sci-Pedagogy Nursing Music

Undergraduate Minors

Economics English Geography Geology History Kinesiology Latin American Studies Marketing Mathematics Music Operations Mgmt

and Supervision Psychology Public Administration Rehabilitation Services Science Education Secondary Education Social Science Social Work Sociology Spanish Special Education Zoology

Political Science Pre-Law Psychology Public Administration Sociology Spanish Sports Medicine Theater Wellness Zoology

Educational Teaching Endorsement Fields

Art Education Bilingual Education Business Marketing Classical Language - Spanish Earth and Space Science

Contract Minor

General Science Language Arts Mathematics Psychology Reading Social Studies TESOL Theater Education Wellness

Baccalaureate degree seeking students may pursue a contract minor when the circumstances warrant such an option. A contract minor provides students the opportunity to pursue a minor in a field, or related fields, not listed as majors or minors in WNMU’s catalog.

The following conditions and guidelines apply.

  1. The contract minor must not duplicate any existing program at WNMU.
  2. The program must be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs or designee and the department chair(s) of the department(s) through which the contract minor is offered.
  3. To gain approval the student is required to write a proposal which must include, but is not limited to, the following:
a.
A full, detailed description of the course of study and rationale for allowing the program;
b.
Faculty advisor(s) who will be charged with overseeing the program. Contract minor advisors must be full time WNMU faculty;
c.
The names of all faculty, full time or otherwise, who have agreed to work on the program, including their qualifications and a rationale for their inclusion in the program;
d.
A list of clearly stated expected outcomes, special skills, expertise, etc. which the student would obtain from such a program.
  1. The student must prepare a detailed learning agreement including program objectives, methods of evaluation, reading lists, cognitive skills to be acquired, and any other component central to the program’s academic integrity.
  2. Both the proposal and the learning agreement must be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs or designee, the faculty advisor(s), and the department chair(s) of participating faculty.
  3. The semester prior to graduation, a meeting will take place among the faculty advisor(s), the faculty working on the program, and the student. The purpose of this meeting will be to discuss the anticipated graduation, possible deficiencies, and other issues pertinent to completion of the program.
  4. At the program’s completion, the student must submit to his/her faculty advisor(s) a program summary assessing the program’s success, a summary of its benefits, and if appropriate, a discussion of its shortcomings or failings.
  5. When all requirements are met and all work is completed, the faculty advisor(s) will submit a recommendation of completion to the Vice President for Academic Affairs or designee, for final approval. The student must also submit required documentation to the Registrar’s Office for a degree audit (see graduation requirements).

Developmental Studies

Western New Mexico University offers two levels of developmental coursework in each of the areas of reading, writing, and mathematics. These courses are offered for those students who are underprepared for college coursework in one or more of these areas. Students are placed into a developmental course on the basis of their COMPASS placement test score. The COMPASS test is a computerized placement test that all first-time entering freshmen are required to take before they register for classes at WNMU.

Developmental Studies courses are also excellent “brush-up” courses for students returning to college after an extended absence. These courses do not meet General Education requirements, nor do they count toward the completion of any degree. They do however count as institutional credit for the purpose of financial aid qualification and grade point average determination. Students who need to take several developmental courses should plan on taking more time to graduate than students who do not need developmental coursework.

Course descriptions are found under “Developmental Studies”:

DVSM - Developmental Math

DVSR - Developmental Reading

DVSW - Developmental Writing

Millennium III Honors Program

The WNMU Millennium III Honors Program serves students in all majors and minors. The Program provides enriched courses and activities for bright, highly-motivated students. The Program focuses on active rather than passive learning thereby offering its students a richer return on their investment in time, money and effort as well as extended opportunities for intellectual and academic growth. Honors courses are intended to be more stimulating, challenging and exciting than regular courses. Honors social events are also designed to be intellectually engaging. In addition to intellectual achievement, the Honors student would be at a distinct advantage in applying to graduate schools and in job searches.

Some of the features of the Millennium III program are:

-Honors versions of required courses

-Interdisciplinary courses

-Colloquia and Seminars

-Independent research

-Social events

-Opportunities to mix with professors

-Special distinction at Commencement

-Recommendation letters from Honors Director

-Network of former honors colleagues Admission requirements

-ACT score of 24 or better, or

-combined SAT verbal or math score of 1110 or better, or

-be in the top 15% of high school class, or

-a high school cumulative GPA at the time of application of 3.8 or better or

-completion of at least 15 college credit hours with a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or

better Interested students must apply to the Director of the Honors Program. Once accepted into the program, freshman must maintain at least a 3.3 cumulative GPA. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors must maintain at least a 3.5 cumulative GPA to remain in the program.

Exceptional students who are not admitted to the Honors Program may occasionally be allowed to enroll in an Honors Course with the permission of the instructor. This will be allowed only if there is space remaining at the beginning of the semester. For this reason, non-Honors students will not be allowed to pre-register in any Honors course. The instructor of the course will establish the criteria to allow a non-Honors student to enroll in an Honors course.

WNMU Honors Curriculum

(24 - 25 credit hours)

Lower Division

General Education (18-19 credit hours) Students are required to take three of the following courses:

CMPS 111H Computer Literacy-PC 3
COMM 110H Public Speaking 3
ENGL 101H Composition and Rhetoric I 3
ENGL 102H Composition and Rhetoric II 3

CMPS 111H and ENGL 101H are offered every Fall; COMM 110H and ENGL 102H are offered every Spring.

Students must choose three additional lower division honors courses which apply towards General Education credit. One or two courses from a different General Education area are offered each semester.

The schedule is generally as follows:

Social and Behavioral Sciences -Every Fall History -Every Spring Expressive Arts -Fall odd numbered years Literature -Fall even numbered years Laboratory Science -Spring even numbered years

Honors Seminars - ACAD 198H (3 credit hours)

Students are required to take three lower division seminars. These courses generally meet no more than once a week and may have an irregular schedule. They often involve intensive discussions. These courses may also involve field trips, attending performances, working on a group project, or other types of non-traditional learning activities. Generally, one lower division Honors Seminar is offered each semester.

Upper Division (3 credit hours) Students are required to complete an Honors Program degree plan by the beginning of their junior year. The plan specifies how they will complete the three hours of required upper division coursework. There are three options:

  1. Senior Project or Thesis: Students may complete a project or a thesis in those majors which have provided for this as an option.
  2. Honors Colloquia (ACAD 398H): Students may take three upper division colloquia. As with the lower division seminars, these courses generally meet no more than once a week and may have an irregular schedule. Generally, one upper division Honors Colloquium is offered each semester.
  3. Contract Honors Course: This option allows students to sign a contract to do additional work in a course. Contract Honors Courses require the approval of the Honors Program Director.

Students who complete an A.A. or A.S. Degree may graduate as Millennium III honors graduates by completing all of the lower-division requirements listed above.

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Non-Degree Courses

Courses numbered 444 or 544 (See Professional Development, Teacher Education Programs listed in School of Education Section) or Developmental Courses may not be applied toward a degree.

Associate Degrees

A candidate for an associate degree offered by WNMU must meet the specific requirements indicated in the degree program outlined by the major department in this Catalog. In addition, the student is subject to the following WNMU regulations:

  1. A minimum of 64 credit hours is required. A minimum of 16 credit hours must be earned in residence at WNMU, including continuing education courses with no more than six credit hours of correspondence credit. The remainder may be acceptable transfer credits earned from fully accredited institutions of higher learning and/or from regionally accredited technical-vocational institutions (see Transfer Students under Academic Regulations).
  2. Complete ENGL 101 with a C or better and all courses required for the major with a grade of C or better. The A.A. in Liberal Studies does not require a grade of C or better in core courses. All Associate Degrees require the student to have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.0. Developmental Studies courses do not count toward degree completion. They do count toward the G.P.A.
  3. File an advisor approved degree plan and application for degree audit by September 1 for spring graduation, February 1 for summer, or May 1 for fall graduation with the Registrar’s Office. The student will be advised in writing of the results.
  4. Complete a graduation application and pay a graduation fee of $60, by the deadline date published in the schedule of classes and catalog.
  5. Remove any indebtedness to WNMU. Complete all coursework prior to the last day of the semester.

Bachelor Degrees

A candidate for a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.), Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.), Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.), or Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) offered by WNMU must meet the specific requirements indicated in the degree program outlined by the major/ minor department in this Catalog.

Students completing a bachelor’s degree may include a maximum of 44 credit hours earned through the ACT examination, CLEP examination (32 credit hours combined ACT/CLEP maximum), Adult Learning and Education Experiences (44 credit hours maximum), Advanced Placement Program and correspondence work (nine credit hours maximum). This does not include transfer work. Students may use any combination of the above listed programs, not to exceed individual program maximums (which may be more restrictive) or the overall maximum (44 credit hours). In addition, the student is subject to the following WNMU regulations:

  1. A minimum of 128 credit hours is required (to include no more than nine credit hours of correspondence credit), with a minimum of 54 credit hours of upper level courses (300-400 series). B.A.S. and B.S.N. degrees may require less than 54 hours of upper division credit. With the exception of B.A.S. degrees, six credit hours of the upper level courses must be outside of the major (and minor if the department or school requires a minor). If a degree does not require a minor, the six hours may be included in a minor. Twelve credit hours must be from designated writing intensive courses.
    1. Successful completion of General Education requirements (normally 41 credit hours), major (30 or more credit hours), and minor (18-24 credit hours). Some majors allow waiver of the minor requirement. Majors that allow waiver of the minor requirement indicate such under the major requirements.
    2. An associates degree may be substituted for a minor if the associate degree contains at least eighteen hours of required coursework in a specific disci pline that is different from the coursework required for the major.
  2. Second language requirement (for B.A. and B.S.W. degree): This requirement is fulfilled by the satisfactory completion of one of the following courses: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, SPAN 252 or any upper division Spanish course.

B.S.W. students must successfully complete six credit hours in a language other than English or its equivalent. Students who have studied a language in high school, or who have proficiency in a language, may determine the level at which they should begin language study by consulting the Chair of the Humanities Department.

  1. Mathematics/Computer science requirement (for B.S., B.B.A., B.A.S. degrees): Students must complete six credit hours of mathematics and/or computer science and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics or EDUC 402, Computers in the Classroom, in addition to the three or six credit hours of mathematics and three credit hours of computer science used to fulfill the General Education requirements. Sociology majors may not use GEOG/SOC 323 for B.S. requirement.
  2. Demonstrate a minimum competence (grade of C) by satisfactorily completing English 101 and 102 or attaining an acceptable score on an authorized proficiency test, prior to graduation.
    1. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is required. No grade below a C is acceptable in the major and minor areas. Developmental Studies courses do not count toward any degree completion. They do count toward the G.P.A.
    2. NOTE: Some departments require a GPA higher than 2.0 to graduate. It is the student’s responsibility to meet individual departmental regulations.
  3. Residence credit requirement for all candidates for a Bachelors degree:

Regular Students: Twelve of the last eighteen credit hours of course work for the degree must be completed in residence. Students who lack no more than six credit hours to graduate and have met all other requirements may complete their course work in non-residence, provided such course work is completed no later than one year from the last time of residence enrollment and provided the student has requested and received permission from the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs prior to the end of the last semester in residence.

Transfer Students: Thirty credit hours of course work for the degree must be completed in residence, of which 20 credit hours must be satisfactorily completed in the upper level courses (numbered 300-499). At least six credit hours in the elected major and three credit hours in the minor must be completed in residence. Credit is transferred at the level given at the sending institution for four year institutions. Credits earned at two year institutions cannot be used to meet upper division requirements.

Transfer Students from Quarter hour system for General Education (see General Education section)

- a 5 quarter hour course (or combination course and lab) that converts to

3.34 semester hours will be deemed to fulfill a 4 hours General Education requirement such as in the Laboratory Science area

- a 4 quarter hour course that converts to 2.67 semester hours will be deemed to fulfill a 3 hour General Education requirement

  1. File an advisor approved degree plan and application for degree audit by September 1 for spring graduation, February 1 for summer, or May 1 for fall graduation with the Registrar’s Office. The student will be advised in writing of the results by the Registrar’s Office.
  2. Complete a graduation application and pay a graduation fee of $60, by the deadline date published in the schedule of classes and catalog.
  3. Remove any indebtedness to WNMU. Complete all course work prior to the last day of the semester.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (additional requirements)

In addition to the above listed requirements, a candidate for the B.F.A. degree must meet the following WNMU degree requirements and is subject to the following WNMU regulations:

  1. The student must be admitted to the B.F.A. Program. Admission packets and information are available at the Expressive Arts Department. A student must have a 3.0 grade point average in all art classes previously taken and have completed the Art & Design courses (27 credit hours) to be eligible to apply to the program.
  2. Application requires a portfolio of the student’s work (20 labeled 35-mm slides or a CD-PC Adobe Photoshop compatible), list of works, statement of BFA goals and art philosophy, and sponsorship from a member of the art faculty.
  3. B.F.A. students must successfully complete 83 credit hours in art as follows: 27 credit hours in Art & Design courses, 12 credit hours in introductory Studio courses, 24 credit hours in upper division Studio courses, 13 credit hours in Art History (including 1 credit for the Art History Visual Thesis), and 7 credit hours of additional BFA required courses.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (additional requirements)

In addition to the above listed requirements, a candidate for the B.S.N. Degree must meet the following WNMU degree requirements and is subject to the following WNMU regulations:

  1. The student must be admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. A student must have an approved A.D.N. or Diploma program in nursing with a valid license as a Registered Nurse in the State of New Mexico or a Multi-state Licensure compact state. The student must also have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 at the time of admission.
  2. Successful completion of 50 credit of upper division courses are required (six credits outside of major).

Bachelor of Social Work Degree (additional requirements)

In addition to the above listed requirements, a candidate for the B.S.W. Degree must meet the following WNMU degree requirements and is subject to the following WNMU regulations:

  1. The student must be admitted to the Social Work program. Admission packets and information are available at the Social Work Department. A student must have a 2.5 cumulative grade point average and pass SWK 101 with a C or better to be eligible to apply to the program.
  2. Students must be admitted to the program prior to enrolling in SWK 386, Social Work Practice I. Academic credit for life or previous work experience will not be awarded. Demonstrate minimum competency (grade of C) in the following courses: ENGL 101 and 102, COMM 110, MATH 111, MATH 321 and all Social Work professional foundation courses. Developmental Studies courses do not count toward degree completion. They do count toward the GPA.
  3. Students who have completed a degree, must complete 46 credit hours of professional foundation courses, other courses required by the B.S.W. degree, and all other regulations regarding their particular status.
  4. B.S.W. students must successfully complete six credit hours in a language other than English or its equivalent.

Earning a Second Undergraduate Degree

It is possible for a student to earn more than one undergraduate degree/major. To obtain a second associate/baccalaureate degree/major, the student must complete the following requirements:

  1. Meet admission criteria for the second degree/major;
  2. Meet all degree requirements of the new degree/major. There are no minor requirements for a second bachelor’s degree. General Education will be satisfied with the first baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited university or college.
  3. Transfer students wishing to obtain a second degree/major must meet the residency requirements specified for associate/baccalaureate degrees.

DOUBLE MAJORS: Completion of a second major is recorded on a student’s permanent record, but as a second major, not a second degree. A second degree is not awarded for an additional major (or for an additional minor). Example: A person earning a B.B.A. in Accounting could not obtain a second B.B.A. in Management. Rather, the transcript would reflect a single B.B.A. with two majors.

DUAL DEGREES: Students who wish to be granted two undergraduate degrees (A.A., A.S., A.A.S., B.S., B.A., B.B.A., B.A.S., B.S.N., B.S.W., etc.) must fulfill all the requirements specified for each individual degree. Example: A person earning a B.A. in Botany could earn a B.S. in Zoology, but would be required to meet the second language requirement for the B.A. degree and/or the math/computer science requirement for the B.S. degree. A student will also need to meet the major requirements. A person cannot obtain a second degree with the same major as the first degree. Example: A person cannot earn both a B.A. and a B.S. degree in Biology.

The Bachelor of General Studies degree may not be used a second baccalaureate undergraduate degree. The Associate of Liberal Studies degree may be used as a second associate undergraduate degree providing that the student has 15 hours of coursework beyond the General Education and major coursework that was required for the first associate degree.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

Western New Mexico University recognizes its obligation to insure that each student acquires the foundation necessary to function fully in our complex and evolving society. The University believes the development of the educated person goes beyond the foundation and must include an appreciation and understanding of broad aspects of human knowledge. Through the General Education Program the University encourages each student to explore the world in which he or she lives from a variety of perspectives. The University seeks to develop each student as a whole person capable of contributing to society and appreciating its diversity.

The goals of the General Education Program at the University are as follows:

  1. Provide each student with opportunities for critical thinking and reasoning, communication of ideas and information to others, numerical analysis and decision-making, and insure personal and emotional well-being.
  2. Ensure that graduates of the University possess the skills necessary to interact positively and productively in society.
  3. Develop personal, social, and cultural awareness that values cultural diversity and recognizes the commonalities that bind peoples of the world.
  4. Instill an appreciation for the variety of perspectives that are used to interpret the world in which we live and that provide the foundation for solving the problems that confront society.

Based on these goals, the following objectives are incorporated into the General Education Program, with emphasis placed on integrating an appreciation of cultural diversity throughout the curriculum

a.
Critical thinking
b.
Creativity
c.
Communication (written, oral, and visual)
d.
Multicultural perspectives e Social responsibility and cooperation
f.
Literacy of all types (reading, numbers, consumerism, technology)
g.
Intellectual curiosity and wonder (continued learning)

h. Environmental responsibility The General Education Program requirements are university requirements and cannot be waived at the departmental level. Due to the foundational nature of the General Education Program, students are urged to complete these course requirements early in their undergraduate careers. Specific majors or minors may require specific courses, which may be counted in that major or minor. Some of the supporting courses may be counted for General Education Requirements. No course may be counted for more than one General Education requirement. All students must complete the requirement for writing-intensive courses. Please refer to departmental sections of the catalog.

Transfer Students from Quarter hour system:

- a 5 quarter hour course (or combination course and lab) that converts to

3.34 semester hours will be deemed to fulfill a 4 hours General Education requirement such as in the Laboratory Science area;

-
a 4 quarter hour course that converts to 2.67 semester hours will be deemed to fulfill a 3 hour General Education requirement;
-
a 1 quarter hour course that converts to 0.67 semester hours will be deemed to fulfill a 1 hour General Education requirement such as in the Physical and Mental Well-Being area

All students should familiarize themselves with other degree requirements listed in the Undergraduate Degree Requirements section.

Area I: Communication (9 hours) Outcomes

a.
Analyze and evaluate oral and written communication in terms of situation, audience, purpose, aesthetics, and adverse points of view.
b.
Express a primary purpose in a compelling statement and order sup- porting points logically and convincingly.
c.
Use effective rhetorical strategies to persuade, inform, and engage.
d.
Employ writing and/or speaking processes such as planning, collabo rating, organizing, composing, revising, and editing to create presenta- tions using correct diction, syntax, grammar, and mechanics.
e.
Integrate research correctly and ethically from credible sources to sup- port the primary purpose of communication.
f.
Engage in reasoned civic discourse while recognizing the distinctions
among opinions, facts, and inferences. 1) Oral Communication Courses: COMM 110; THR 250 (3 hours)
2) Written Communication Courses: ENGL 101, ENGL 102 (6 hours)

Requirements for both courses include an exit exam, which will be scored pass/fail by English faculty. Failure of the exam will lower the course grade one letter grade.

Area II: Mathematics (3 or 6 hours) Outcomes

a.
Display, analyze, and interpret data.
b.
Demonstrate knowledge of problem solving strategies.
c.
Construct valid mathematical explanations.
d.
Display an understanding of the development of mathematics.
e.
Demonstrate an appreciation for the extent, application, and beauty of mathematics.

Courses:

One MATH course numbered 131-299 or two MATH courses numbered below 131.

Area III: Laboratory Science (8 hours) Outcomes

a.
Describe the process of scientific inquiry.
b.
Solve problems scientifically.
c.
Communicate scientific information.
d.
Apply quantitative analysis to scientific problems.
e.
Apply scientific thinking to real world problems.

Courses:

Two courses (including their associated laboratories) are required: BIOL 101/103 & BIOL 102/104 primarily for non-science majors, BIOL 202/203 & BIOL 204/205 primarily for science majors CHEM 121/123, CHEM 151/153, CHEM 152/154 GEOL 101/103, GEOL 102/104, GEOL 201/203; PHSC 101/103, PHSC 102/104, PHSC 115/116, PHSC 171/173; PHYS 151/153, PHYS 152/154, PHYS 171/173, PHYS 172/174

Area IV: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6-9 hours**) Outcomes

a.
Identify, describe, and explain how human behaviors are influenced by social structures, institutions, and processes within the contexts of complex and diverse communities.
b.
Articulate how beliefs, assumptions, and values are influenced by fac tors such as politics, geography, economics, culture, biology, history, and social institutions.
c.
Describe ongoing reciprocal interactions among self, society, and the environment.
d.
Apply the knowledge base of the social and behavioral sciences to identify, describe, explain, and critically evaluate relevant issues, ethical dilemmas, and arguments.

Courses

Two or three courses from separate disciplines from the following are required: ANTH 201, ANTH 202; ECON 201, ECON 202; GEOG 201, GEOG 202, GEOG 205; POLS 201, 202 PSY 102; SOC 101, SOC 102

Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (9-12 hours**) Outcomes

a.
Analyze and critically interpret significant primary texts and/or works of art (this includes fine art, literature, music, theatre, and film).
b.
Compare art forms, modes of thought and expression, and processes across a range of historical periods and/or structures (such as politi cal, geographic, social, cultural, religious, intellectual).
c.
Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across a range of historical periods and/or cultural perspectives.
d.
Draw on historical and/or cultural perspectives to evaluate and/or all of the following contemporary problems/issues, contemporary modes of expression, and contemporary thought.

Three or four courses from at least three separate categories are required:

Courses: 1) History

HIST 111, 112, 201, 202

2) Literature

ENGL 200, 201, 205, 225, 240, 265, 293, 294, 296, 297

3) Aesthetics (Art, Music, Theater)

ART 101, 102, 103, 107, 205, 210, 211, 230, 241; MUSC 111, 119; THR 110, 136, 211

4) Philosophy

PHIL 100, 101, 200 **The total credits from Area IV and Area V must be 18 hours

Computer Literacy (3 hours) Outcomes

a.
Ability to use database, spreadsheet, word processing and data analysis software packages.
b.
Increase computer-related consumer literacy

Courses:

One course from the following is required: CMPS 110 or 111 or passing a challenge examination administered by the department over the material.

Student Success Seminar (ACAD 101)

All students entering WNMU and pursuing a baccalaureate and some associate degrees will be required to take the Student Success Seminar (ACAD 101). The following students shall be exempt from the requirement:

Communication in Written English

Prior to enrollment in any upper division course, students must have passed Composition & Rhetoric I and II (ENGL 101 and ENGL 102) or their equivalent with a grade of C or better. Academic departments may designate specific courses that are exempt from this requirement. Nursing & Occupational Therapy students are allowed to take upper division classes as required and/or approved by the program without the requisite ENGL 102.

Twelve credits of writing-intensive courses are required for graduation. These courses are designated as WI in the semester class schedules. ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 do not count as writing-intensive.

Writing-intensive courses require a minimum of twelve pages of typed text or their equivalency (roughly 3,000 words). These writing assignments are part of the student’s final grade and can be a combination of papers and essay exams. Individual departments further determine their policy concerning writing-intensive courses and can set higher standards.

Education Majors

The Teacher Education Program has the following state general education requirements beyond the campus wide general education hours: English - 3 credit hours, History - 6 credit hours, History of New Mexico - 3 credit hours, and Lab Science from three separate disciplines: Life Science, Physical Science and Earth and Space Science - See School of Education section of catalog. Also, Special Education and Elementary Education majors will take MATH 301 and MATH 302 for the B.S. degree requirements. This does not apply to majors in Career and Technical Teacher Education.

Please see the specific degree plans in the School of Education section of this catalog for additional detail on courses required by each education major.

Foreign Language Requirement for B.A. Students

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts degree must complete two years (or its equivalent) of a foreign language. The foreign language requirement is fulfilled by the completion of Spanish 202 or Spanish 252, or Spanish 214 (for native speakers only), or any upper-level Spanish course.

Students who have studied a foreign language in high school, or those who believe they have some proficiency in a foreign language, may determine the level at which they should begin language study by consulting the Humanities Department Chair.

Foreign Language Requirement for B.S.W. Students

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Social Work must successfully complete six credit hours in language other than English or its equivalent.

Math/Computer Science Requirement for B.S./ B.B.A./

B.A.S. Students

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Business Administration, or the Bachelor of Applied Science degree must complete six credit hours of mathematics and/or computer science and/or GEOG/SOC 323, Social Statistics, and/or EDUC 402, Computers in the Classroom, in addition to the mathematics and computer science General Education requirements. Elementary Education majors and Special Education majors must take Math 301 and Math 302 for the B.S. requirement.

Transferred in General Education Courses

Course numbers 175 and 275 are a unique identifier for courses transferred in as General Education that do not have equivalencies with WNMU courses.

Complaint Procedure for Transfer Credit Appeal

All New Mexico public post secondary institutions are required to establish policies and practices for receiving and resolving complaints from students or from other complainants regarding the transfer of course work from other public institutions in the state. WNMU’s complaint process is as follows:

  1. File a written appeal with the Registrar’s Office providing the prefix/number of the course(s) in question, semester and year the course was taken, the name of the course and the course description from sending institution’s catalog.
  2. If the request is denied, the student may continue the appeal process to the Office of the Provost and must do so no later than 30 days following the notification of denial.
  3. The Provost’s Office, in concert with the appropriate college and/or content area, will review applicable materials and render a final decision.

If the course or courses in question are part of a state approved transfer module, the student may make further appeal to the Higher Education Department in Santa Fe by contacting:

Deputy Secretary for Academic Affairs Higher Education Department New Mexico School for the Deaf Campus 1068 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-1650 If a student’s articulation complaint is upheld at that level, and the student was required to repeat the course, the receiving institution shall reimburse the student the complete cost, including tuition, books and fees.

Transferring Courses to Fulfill the New Mexico General Education Common Core

During the 2005 New Mexico Legislative session, Senate Bill 161, consistent with requirements of state law (Chapter 224 of the Laws of New Mexico, 1995 as amended) was signed into law to further enhance and facilitate the articulation of general education courses among New Mexico’s colleges and universities. In accordance with policies established by the New Mexico Higher Education Department, designated general education core courses successfully completed at any regionally accredited public institution of higher education in New Mexico are guaranteed to transfer to any New Mexico public institution and apply toward certificate and/or degree program requirements. Students who have decided on a major and/or an institution at which to complete their studies should consult with an academic advisor at that particular institution to determine the most appropriate course selections. Students enrolling for the first-year of study at a New Mexico college or university and considering possible transfer into a certificate and/or degree program at another institution are encouraged to take the courses approved for transfer during their freshman and sophomore year of study.

The core matrix of approved courses guaranteed to transfer and meet general education requirements at any New Mexico college or university can be found on the New Mexico Higher Education Department website at http://hed.state.nm.us . Follow the "New Mexico Colleges and Universities” link to the drop down menu and select “Transferring Credits”, then select “Core Matrix”. Courses are listed by institution, whether university or community college, under each of the five general education areas.

The course prefix and number listed at the top of each column is the New Mexico Common Course Number. This is a four alpha/four numeric set of uniform course designations that serve as a single reference point for courses taught throughout the state that share substantially equivalent content. Courses bearing this designation are part of a statewide equivalency table that cross-references the institutional course and number with the universal “common course number” creating an easy one-to-one match.

Students may find the New Mexico Common Course Number listed in crosswalks, degree outlines, transfer guides and in course descriptions in college catalogs and websites. Simply put, the common course number “matches up” equivalent courses at multiple institutions ensuring students that the course will transfer to the receiving institution and meet degree requirements as if it were taken on that campus.

These NM Common Course numbers can be found at the end of each course description, if applicable, in the undergraduate course description section of this catalog.

State Wide Articulation of Lower-Division Common Core

Student Responsibility

New Mexico’s colleges and universities have collaborated to produce guides to assist students who plan to transfer before completing a program of study. Course modules are designed to help students select courses carefully so that they may transfer with little or no loss of credit. However, planning for effective transfer with maximum efficiency is ultimately the student’s responsibility. Responsible transfer planning includes consultation with the intended degree-granting institution to assure that all pre-transfer coursework will meet the requirements of the desired degree.

Lower-Division 64-hour Transfer Modules

Students who have selected a field of study but have not yet selected the college or university where they wish to earn their baccalaureate degree are advised to take courses during their freshman and sophomore years outlined in one of the Lower-Division 64-hour Transfer Modules. For students enrolled at any other public institution in New Mexico, these courses are guaranteed to transfer to any public institution in New Mexico and to apply toward bachelor’s degree program requirements. Students should consult advisors at their current institutions regarding which specific classes fit these categories. Lower division transfer modules presently exist for:

Business Criminal Justice Early Childhood Education

Lower-Division General Education Common Core with New Mexico Common Course Number

Area I: Communications 9 semester hours

(a) College-Level English Composition 3-4 hrs

(ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I, NMCCN ENGL 1113)

(b) College-Level Writing (a second course building on the above) 3 hrs

(ENGL 102 Composition & Rhetoric II, NMCCN ENGL 1123)

(c) Public Speaking (oral communication) 3 hrs

(COMM 110 Public Speaking, NMCCN COMM 1113)

Area II: Mathematics 3 semester hours
(a) College Algebra (or higher level) (MATH 131 College Algebra, NMCCN MATH 1113) (b) Calculus (MATH 171 Calculus I, NMCCN MATH 1615) or higher level calculus (c) Other College-Level Mathematics 3 hrs 3 hrs 3 hrs
Area III: Laboratory Science 8 semester hours
(a) General Biology, with laboratory 4-8 hrs

(BIOL 101/103 Biology for General Education I & lab; NMCCN BIOL 1111/1113)

(BIOL 102/104 Biology for General Education II & lab; NMCCN BIOL 1121/1123) (BIOL 202/203 BIOL Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab, NMCCN BIOL 1211/1213) (BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab, NMCCN BIOL 1221/1223)

(b) General Chemistry, with laboratory 4-8 hrs

(CHEM 121/123 Chemistry for Life & lab, NMCCN CHEM 1111/1113) (CHEM 151/153 General Chemistry I & lab, NMCCN CHEM 1213/1211) (CHEM 152/154 General Chemistry II & lab, NMCCN CHEM 1221/1223)

(c) General Physics, with laboratory 4-8 hrs

(PHYS 151/153 General Physics (non-calculus) I & lab, NMCCN PHYS 1111/1113) (PHYS 152/154 General Physics (non-calculus) II & lab, NMCCN PHYS 1121/1123) (PHYS 171/173 Principles of Physics (calculus-based) I & lab, NMCCN PHYS 1211/1213) (PHYS 172/174 Principles of Physics (calculus-based) II & lab, NMCCN PHYS 1221/1223)

(d) Geology/Earth Science, with laboratory 4-8 hrs

(GEOL 201/203 Environmental Science & lab, NMCCN ENVS 1111/1113) (GEOL 101/103 General Geology I & lab, NMCCN GEOL 1111/1113) (GEOL 102/104 General Geology II & lab, NMCCN GEOL 1211/1213)

(e) Astronomy, with laboratory 4-8 hrs

(PHSC 115/116 Descriptive Astronomy & lab; NMCCN ASTR 1111/1113)

Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences 6 - 9 semester hours

(a) Economics (Macro or Microeconomics) 3 hrs

(ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics, NMCCN ECON 2113) (ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics, NMCCN ECON 2123)

(b) Introductory Political Science 3 hrs

(POLS 201 American National Government, NMCCN POLS 1123)

(c) Introductory Psychology 3 hrs

(PSY 102 General Psychology, NMCCN PSYC 1113)

(d) Introductory Sociology 3 hrs

(SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology, NMCCN SOCI 1113) (SOC 102 Social Problems, NMCCN SOCI 2113)

(e) Introductory Anthropology 3 hrs

(ANTH 201 Cultural Anthropology; NMCCN ANTH 2113) (ANTH 202 Physical Anthropology & Archaeology; NMCCN 2213)

Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts 6 - 9 semester hours

(a) Introductory History Survey 3 hrs

(HIST 111 World Civilization I, NMCCN HIST 1053) (HIST 112 World Civilization II, NMCCN HIST 1063)

(HIST 201 American History, NMCCN HIST 1113) (HIST 202 American History II, NMCCN HIST 1123)

(b) Philosophy 3 hrs

(PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy, NMCCN PHIL 1113)

(c) Introductory Course in History, Theory or Aesthetics of the Arts, or Literature 3 hrs

(ART 211 Art Appreciation; NMCCN ARTS 1113) (ENGL 201 Introduction to Literature, NMCCN ENGL 2213) (ENGL 200 Poetry, NMCCN ENGL 2313) (ENGL 225 The Short Story, NMCCN ENGL 2343) (ENGL 293 English Literature I, NMCCN ENGL 2413) (ENGL 294 English Literature II, NMCCN ENGL 2423) (ENGL 296 American Literature I, NMCCN ENGL 2513) (ENGL 297 American Literature II, NMCCN ENGL 2523) (ENGL 265 World Literature, NMCCN ENGL 2613) (ENGL 205 Hispanic American Literature, NMCCN ENGL 2723) (ENGL 240 Native American Literature, NMCCN ENGL 2733) (MUSC 111 Music Appreciation, NMCCN MUSI 1113) (THR 110 Theater/Drama Appreciation, NMCCN THTR 1113)

Common Module Total 35 semester hours

Academic Support Center Degrees

Although the Academic Support Center is not an academic Department per se, the following degrees are advised through the ASC:

FOUR YEAR DEGREE

Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S)

A candidate for the B.G.S. Degree must meet the following WNMU minimum degree requirements and is subject to the following WNMU regulations. This degree will reflect a major in General Studies with no minor.

Students completing a bachelor’s degree may include a maximum of 44 credit hours earned through the ACT examination, CLEP examination (32 credit hours combined ACT/CLEP maximum), Adult Learning and Education Experiences (44 credit hours maximum), Advanced Placement Program and correspondence work (9 credit hours maximum). This does not include transfer work. Students may use any combination of the above listed programs, not to exceed individual program maximums (which may be more restrictive) or the overall maximum (44 credit hours):

  1. A minimum of 128 credits hours is required (no more than nine hours of correspondence credit).
  2. Successful completion of General Education Requirements (41 credit hours minimum).
  3. A minimum of 54 credit hours of upper division courses (300-400 level). Students must pass all upper level courses with a grade of C or better.
  4. A cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 is required. Developmental studies courses do not count toward degree completion. They do count toward the G.P.A.
  5. Demonstrate a minimum competence (grade of C) by satisfactorily completing English 101 and 102 with a C or better or attaining a suitable score on an authorized proficiency test prior to graduation.
  6. Residence credit requirement for all candidates for a Bachelors degree:

Regular Students: Twelve of the last eighteen credit hours of course work for the degree must be completed in residence. Students who lack no more than six credit hours to graduate and have met all other requirements may complete their course work in non-residence, provided such course work is completed no later than one year from the last time of residence enrollment and provided the student has requested and received permission from the Vice President for Academic Affairs prior to the end of the last semester in residence.

Transfer Students: Thirty credit hours of course work for the degree must be completed in residence, of which 20 credit hours must be satisfactorily completed in the upper level courses (numbered 300-499). At least six credit hours in the elected major and three credit hours in the minor must be completed in residence. Credit is transferred at the level given at the sending institution.

  1. File an advisor approved degree plan and Graduation/Audit Application by September 1 for spring graduation, February 1 for summer, or June 1 for fall graduation with the Registrar’s Office. The student will be advised in writing of the results by the Registrar’s Office.
  2. The student must pay a graduation fee of $40, by the deadline date published in the schedule of classes and catalog.
  3. Remove any indebtedness to WNMU and completed all course work prior to the last day of the semester.

TWO YEAR DEGREE

Associate of Art in Liberal Studies Degree (A.A.)

The Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies (AA) degree is recommended for students whose educational goals require flexibility. This two-year degree will be offered to prepare students for transfer to a four-year post-secondary institution and will also provide students with an opportunity to design a customized program to accomplish their personal educational goals. A minimum of 64 credit hours are required for the AA degree. The degree allows students to choose any elective courses, except for Developmental Courses, to complete the degree. Courses will be offered in a manner to facilitate the completion of this degree in two years.

A candidate for an associate degree offered by WNMU must meet the specific requirements indicated in the degree program outlined in the catalog. In addition, the student is subject to the following WNMU regulations:

  1. A minimum of 64 credit hours is required. A minimum of 16 credit hours must be earned in residence at WNMU (exclusive of extension, with no more than six hours of correspondence credit). The remainder may be acceptable transfer credits (maximum of 48) earned from fully accredited institutions of higher learning and/or from regionally accredited technical-vocational institutions.
  2. The student must complete ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a C or better. The student must have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.0. Developmental Studies do not count toward degree completion. They do count toward the G.P.A.
  3. File an advisor approved degree plan and Graduation/Audit Application by September 1 for spring graduation, February 1 for summer, or June 1 for fall graduation with the Registrar’s Office. The student will be advised in writing of the results by the Registrar’s Office.
  4. The student must pay a graduation fee of $40, by the deadline date published in the schedule of classes and catalog.
  5. The student must remove any indebtedness to WNMU and complete all coursework prior to the last day of the semester.

The Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies Degree is intended to meet the needs of two types of students:

  1. Those who want to design an associate degree to their own specific needs.
  2. Those who plan to pursue a four-year degree but are undecided as to their choice of a major. The required core curriculum for this degree fulfills the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education lower-division general educational common core.

Note the different Natural Sciences and Humanities credit requirements listed below for these two types of students.

Associate of Art in Liberal Studies Required Core Curriculum

The following courses may require prerequisite coursework:

Communications (9 credit hours) ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 ENGL 102 Composition and Rhetoric II 3 COMM 110 Public Speaking or THR 250 Storytelling 3

Mathematics (3 credits minimum)

Pick one course from the following: MATH 105, 106, 111, 121, 131, 132, or 171 3

Laboratory Sciences (4 or 8 credits)

4 credits for degree plans designed to meet students own specific needs. Select one of the following courses and corresponding lab:

8 credits for students who plan to continue for a four-year degree. Select two of the following courses and corresponding lab:

BIOL 101/103 Biology for General Education I & lab BIOL 102/104 Biology for General Education II & lab BIOL 202/203 Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab CHEM 121/123 Chemistry for Life & lab CHEM 151/153 General Chemistry I & lab CHEM 152/154 General Chemistry II & lab GEOL 101/103 General Geology I & lab GEOL 102/104 General Geology II & lab GEOL 201/203 Environmental Science & lab PHSC 101/103 Physical Science for General Education I & lab PHSC 102/104 Physical Science for General Education II & lab PHSC 115/116 Descriptive Astronomy & lab PHSC 171/173 Forensic Science I & lab PHYS 151/153 General Physics I (non-calculus) & lab PHYS 152/154 General Physics II (non-calculus) & lab PHYS 171/173 Principles of Physics I (calculus-based) & lab PHYS 172/174 Principles of Physics II (calculus-based) & lab Fine Arts (3-4 credits)

ART 101 ART 102 ART 103 ART 107 ART 205 ART 210 ART 211 ART 230 ART 241 MUSC 111 MUSC 119 THR 110 THR 136 THR 211

Select one course from the following:
2-D Design 4
Color 4
3-D Design 4
Drawing I 4
Non-toxic Printmaking I 4
Photography I 4
Art Appreciation 3
Papermaking I 4
Clay I 4
Music Appreciation 3
Fundamentals of Music 3
Theater/Drama Appreciation 3
Introduction to Theater Production 3
Acting I 3

Humanities (3 or 6 credits)

3 credits for degree plans designed to meet students own specific needs. Select one of the following courses (3 credits each):

6 credits for students who plan to continue for a four-year degree. Select two of the following courses (3 credits each):

ENGL 200 Poetry

ENGL 201 Introduction to Literature

ENGL 205 Hispanic American Literature

ENGL 225 The Short Story

ENGL 240 Native American Literature

ENGL 265 World Literature

ENGL 293 English Literature I

ENGL 294 English Literature II

ENGL 296 American Literature I

ENGL 297 American Literature II

PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL 101 Thinking and Problem Solving

PHIL 200 Contemporary Philosophy and Religious Thought

PHIL 201 Logical Methods

PHIL 211 Survey of the New Testament

SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I

SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II

SPAN 151 Beginning Conversational Spanish I

SPAN 152 Beginning Conversational Spanish II

History (3)

Select one of the following (3 credits each):

HIST 111 World Civilization I

HIST 112 World Civilization II

HIST 201 American History I

HIST 202 American History II

academic support center degrees / 129
Social and Behavioral Sciences (3) Select one coures from the following:   
ANTH 201 ANTH 202 ECON 201 ECON 202 GEOG 201 GEOG 202 GEOG 205 POLS 201 POLS 202 PSY 102 SOC 101 SOC 102 Cultural Anthropology Physical Anthropology and Archeology Principles of Macroeconomics Principles of Microeconomics Physical Geography Human Geography World Regional Geography American National Government American State Government General Psychology General Sociology Social Problems   
Computer (3 credits) Select one course from the following:   
CMPS 110 CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - Macintosh Computer Literacy - PC   
Required Core Curriculum—   
for degree plans designed to meet students own specific needs for students who plan to continue for a four-year degree 31 38
Elective Credits—   
for degree plans designed to meet students own specific needs for students who plan to continue for a four-year degree 33 26
Associate of Art in Liberal Studies Total Credit Hours 64

SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

Dean of Community Education & Technology Programs: Antonio Macias Associate Professor: Assistant Professors: Eilert, Lamb Instructors: Benavidez, Nolasco, Sierra

Certificate and Associate Programs: Majors: Automotive Technology, Business and Office Technology, Computer & Network Technology, Construction Technology, Digital Media Communication, Drafting and Design Technology, Electrical Technology, Financial Services, and Welding Technology.

The following regulations apply to all students seeking Applied Technology degrees and certificates.

  1. A grade of C or better in English 101 or equivalent is required.
  2. A maximum of sixteen credit hours may be obtained using any combination of ACT or CLEP examinations.
  3. A maximum of two classes in an Applied Technology associate program may be challenged.
  4. A maximum of eight credit hours of independent/tutorial course work may be applied toward graduation for the associate degree.
  5. A minimum of sixteen credit hours must be taken at WNMU (twelve of the last sixteen credit hours must be at WNMU).
  6. A minimum of a 2.0 grade point average is required for completion.

Automotive Technology

A one year certificate is offered in Automotive Technology. The Basic Automotive Certificate will prepare the student for employment with basic knowledge in automotive repair and diagnosis. Preparation for A.S.E. Certification will be stressed. Students are required to have a basic starter tool set.

The Automotive Technology program uses the nationally recognized NATEF curricula to meet ASE standards. Upon passing at least one ASE exam and after providing proof of two years of relevant work experience, the test taker becomes ASE certified in the areas in which the tests are passed.

CERTIFICATE - AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
(36 credit hours)
General Education Requirements
Math ____ General Education Math (Advisor Approved) 3
Automotive Core Requirements   
AUTT 103 Principles of Auto Electrical 5
AUTT 111 Principles of Auto Brakes 5
AUTT 137 Basic Gasoline Repair/Rebuilding 5
AUTT 139 Principles of Electronic Analysis 5
AUTT 141 Manual Transmission/Clutch & Axle 5
AUTT 252 Automotive Air-Conditioning & Heating Systems 5
WLDT 155 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 3
   Total core credit hours 33

Business and Office Technology

The Business and Office Technology program offers a Fast Track, and a one-year certificate. The purpose of the Fast Track program is to concentrate on MOS certification in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The certificate program is designed for those individuals who desire basic entry-level skills necessary for immediate employment in an office setting.

The Business and Office Technology program uses the MOS curricula to assist students in passing the certification exams.

FAST TRACK MOS CERTIFICATE BUSINESS AND OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

(15 credit hours)

Business and Office Technology Core Requirements

BOFT 114 Records and Information Management 3
BOFT 120 Word Processing I 3
BOFT 228 Business Presentation Applications 3
BOFT 238 Word Processing II 3
BOFT 241 Business Computations 3
   Total credit hours 15

CERTIFICATE - BUSINESS AND OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

(33 credit hours)

General Education Requirements

CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 Total credit hours 6

Business and Office Technology Core Requirements

BOFT 102 Introduction to Keyboarding 3 BOFT 110 Intermediate Keyboarding/Document Formatting 3 BOFT 114 Records and Information Management 3 BOFT 120 Word Processing I 3 BOFT 123 Business Communications I 3 BOFT 124 Windows & the Web 3 BOFT 206 Office Procedures 3 BOFT 228 Business Presentation Applications 3 BOFT 238 Word Processing II 3 Total credit hours 27

Computer & Network Technology

Computer & Network Technology Program offers a one year certificate and a six month fast track certificate with emphasis on preparing and giving students the opportunity to take certification exams in A+, Network+, MCSA, MCSE, Linux, and CISCO. The program is designed to train students interested in developing practical computer-networking knowledge for an entry-level position as a Computer Network Technician. The Computer & Network Technology Program provides students with a hands-on approach to installing, configuring, modifying, customizing, troubleshooting, repairing, maintaining and upgrading computer hardware and software as well as maintaining a Local Area Network (LAN).

FAST TRACK CERTIFICATE COMPUTER AND NETWORK TECHNOLOGY

(22 credit hours)

Computer & Network Technology Core Requirements

CNET 120 A+ Certification Preparation 3
CNET 130 Network+ Certification Preparation 3
CNET 181 Basic Internship 1
CNET 245 Windows 2000 Professional 3
CNET 250 Windows Server I 3
CNET 255 Windows Server II 3
CNET 260 Windows Network Infrastructure I 3
CNET 271 Windows Network Infrastructure II 3
   Total credit hours 22

CERTIFICATE - COMPUTER AND NETWORK TECHNOLOGY

(37 credit hours)

General Education Requirements

CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 Physical Science disciplines & labs for General Ed Lab Science

(e.g. Chemistry, Geology, Physics, Physical Science) 4 13

Computer & Network Technology Core Requirements

APLT 150 Business Practices 2 CNET 120 A+ Certification Preparation 3 CNET 130 Network+ Certification Preparation 3 CNET 181 Basic Internship 1 CNET 245 Windows 2000 Professional 3 CNET 250 Windows Server I 3 CNET 255 Windows Server II 3 CNET 260 Windows Network Infrastructure I 3 CNET 271 Windows Network Infrastructure II 3 Total core credit hours 24

C onstruction Technology

A one year certificate is offered in Construction Technology. It is designed for those individuals who desire the basic entry level skills necessary for immediate employment in the construction industry.

The Construction Technology program uses the National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER) curricula which is standardized to meet the industry standards. NCCER maintains a National Registry which contains the training records of students who have received training through WNMU. The National Registry also gives students more flexibility in their career path planning and ensures that their training accomplishments will be recognized wherever they go. Students taking a course in the Construction Technology Program will automatically be entered into the National Registry after completion of an approval form.

CERTIFICATE - CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

(31 credit hours)

General Education Requirements

ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3

Construction Technology Core Requirements

CNST 101 Introduction to Building Trades 3
CNST 104 General Construction Application 3
CNST 106 Construction Safety and Tools 2
CNST 112 Framing of Floors and Walls 4
CNST 114 Print Reading and Site Layout 3
CNST 120 Site Built and Manufactured Concrete Forms 4
CNST 124 Exterior Finishing and Roofing Applications 5
CNST 126 Principal Layouts of Roofs, Windows and Doors 4
   Total core credit hours 28

Digital Media Communications

Courses, certificates, and degree paths in Digital Media are available to students who seek both knowledge and experience using digital media. Digital Media is of particular relevance to those students who seek to create content online and on screen whether it is for teaching, marketing, the visual arts or creative production in other fields. Digital Media has become of paramount importance to a wide variety of academic disciplines and private sector industries. Students who wish to advance their understanding of the use of digital media tools are encouraged to enroll in Digital Media Courses. Digital multimedia foundation courses are offered at the 200 level and below. These courses can be intensive for students coming to digital media for the first time. Successful Digital Media content production depends upon the interest, commitment, and motivation of the student's desire to progress with a hands-on practical application of digital tool sets used for professional production of film, video, and digital multimedia content.

CERTIFICATE - DIGITAL MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS

(33 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

COMM 110 Public Speaking 3

ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I 3

Select 7 credit hours from any of the following courses:

ART 101, 102, 103, 107, 205, 210, 211, 230, 241

MUSC 111, 119

THR 110, 136, 211 7

Total credit hours 13

Digital Media Communications Core Requirements

DMC 105 Digital Film Editing w/ Final Cut Pro I 3
DMC 110 Image Editing w/Photoshop I 3
DMC 115 Motion Graphics & Visual Effects   
   w/ Adobe After Effects I 4
DMC 120 Digital Film Editing w/ Final Cut Pro II 3
DMC 125 Image Editing with Photoshop II 3
DMC 130 Motion Graphics & Visual Effects   
   w/ Adobe After Effects II 4
   Total core credit hours 20

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN DIGITAL MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS

(66 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

COMM 110 Public Speaking 3 ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 Select 15 credit hours from any of the following courses: ART 101, 102, 103, 107, 205, 210, 211, 230, 241 MUSC 111, 119 THR 110, 136, 211 15

Total credit hours 21

Digital Media Communications Core Requirements

DMC 105 Digital Film Editing w/ Final Cut Pro I 3
DMC 110 Image Editing w/ Photoshop I 3
DMC 115 Motion Graphics & Visual Effects   
   w/ Adobe After Effects I 4
DMC 120 Digital Film Editing w/ Final Cut Pro II 3
DMC 125 Image Editing w/ Photoshop II 3
DMC 130 Motion Graphics & Visual Effects   
   w/ Adobe After Effects II 4
DMC 200 Macromedia I 3
DMC 205 Digital Field Production I 3
DMC 210 Audio Production I 3
DMC 215 Adobe Illustrator I 3
DMC 220 Macromedia II 3
DMC 225 Digital Field Production II 3
DMC 230 Audio Production II 3
DMC 235 Portfolio Review 4
   Total core credit hours 45

Drafting and Design Technology

The certificate in Drafting and Design Technology is designed for those individuals who desire the basic entry level skills necessary for immediate employment in the drafting and design field.

The Drafting and Design Technology program uses the nationally recognized ADDA curricula which assures competent design drafting professionals for the future. The ADDA Certification Program and the commitment to excellence it represents, provides a quality assurance program which benefits both education and industry.

CERTIFICATE - DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

(32 credit hours)

Supporting Couse Work

CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3
ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I 3
MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra 3
   Elective for General Education 3
   Total credit hours 12
Drafting and Design Core Requirements   
APLT 150 Business Practices 2
DFDT 111 Introduction to AutoCAD 3
DFDT 116 Elementary Architectural AutoCAD 3
DFDT 120 Civil AutoCAD 3
DFDT 201 Mechanical/Electrical AutoCAD 3
DFDT 275 3-D Drafting with AutoCAD 3
DFDT 285 Directed Study 3
   Total core credit hours 20

Electrical Technology

The A.A.S. Electrical Technology program is designed to prepare students with a thorough knowledge of all aspects in the trade for immediate employment in industry or to go into an apprenticeship site to gain training needed to apply for the journeyman license. The construction industry needs a trained and educated work force to meet the ever-increasing demands of future construction projects. This work force will require classroom training as well as on-site experience; the electrical technology program is a direct route to a dynamic career.

The Electrical Technology program uses the National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER) curricula which is standardized to meet industry standards. NCCER maintains a National Registry which contains the training records of students who have received training through WNMU. The National Registry also gives students more flexibility in their career path planning and ensures that their training accomplishments will be recognized wherever they go. Students taking a course in the Electrical Technology Program will automatically be entered into the National Registry after completion of an approval form.

CERTIFICATE - ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY

(39 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3
COMM 110 Public Speaking 3
ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3
   Total credit hours 9
Electrical Technology Core Requirements   
ELT 121 Basic Electrical Construction Math 3
ELT 123 Basic Electrical Tools & Safety 3
ELT 124 Introduction to NEC Safety & Plans 3
ELT 125 Electrical Theory, Blueprints & Conductors 3
ELT 126 Electrical Application & Wiring Methods (& lab) 4
ELT 127 Intro to A/C Current, Motor Theory, NEC Application 3
ELT 128 Basic Bending, Cable Tray & Constr. Installation (& lab) 4
ELT 129 Basic Conductor Termination & Grounding 3
ELT 130 Electrical Service Installation (& lab) 4
   Total core credit hours 30

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY

(65 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 COMM 110 Public Speaking 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 Total credit hours 9

Electrical Technology Core Requirements

ELT 121 Basic Electrical Construction Math 3 ELT 123 Basic Electrical Tools & Safety 3 ELT 124 Introduction to NEC Safety & Plans 3 ELT 125 Electrical Theory, Blueprints & Conductors 3 ELT 126 Electrical Application & Wiring Methods (& lab) 4 ELT 127 Intro to A/C Current, Motor Theory, NEC Application 3 ELT 128 Basic Bending, Cable Tray & Constr. Installation (& lab) 4 ELT 129 Basic Conductor Termination & Grounding 3 ELT 130 Electrical Service Installation (& lab) 4 ELT 230 Welding Machines (with lab) 4 ELT 235 Conductor Load Calculations & Overcurrent Protection 3 ELT 236 Distribution, Systems, Raceways & Ballasts 3 ELT 237 Motor Operation & Controls (with lab) 4 ELT 239 Electronic Theory & Wiring Methods 3 ELT 241 Commercial & Residential Load Calculations 3 ELT 242 Advanced Motor Controls & Lighting 3 ELT 243 Intro to Emergency Systems & High Voltage Applications 3 Total core credit hours 56

Financial Services

The Financial Services program offers a Fast Track, or one-year certificate, and an Associate of Science degree in Financial Services. The Associate of Science is a viable degree option for students of diverse backgrounds that are looking for a career in the financial industry and includes a strong comprehensive general education.

FAST TRACK CERTIFICATE FINANCIAL SERVICES

(15 credit hours)

Financial Services Core

BOFT 123 Business Communications I 3
FNSV 101 Business Ethics I 3
FNSV 103 Personal Finance 3
FNSV 107 Service Industry Accounting & Bookkeeping 3
FNSV 110 Basic Office Suite 3
   Total credit hours 15

CERTIFICATE - FINANCIAL SERVICES

(32 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

ECON 200 Basic Economics: Private Enterprise 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 Total credit hours 6

Financial Services Core

BOFT 123 Business Communications I 3 BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 FNSV 101 Business Ethics I 3 FNSV 102 Business Ethics II 2 FNSV 103 Personal Finance 3 FNSV 105 Services Marketing 3 FNSV 107 Service Industry Accounting & Bookkeeping 3 FNSV 110 Basic Office Suite 3 Total credit hours 26

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN FINANCIAL SERVICES

(64 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

COMM 110 Public Speaking 3 ECON 200 Basic Economics: Private Enterprise 3 ECON 201 Principals of Macroeconomics 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 ENGL 102 Composition & Rhetoric II 3 PSY 102 General Psychology 3 Total credit hours 18

Financial Services Core

BOFT 123 Business Communications I 3 BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 BSAD 303 Risk and Insurance 3 BSAD 306 Principles of Real Estate 3 BSAD 331 Financial Accounting 3 FNSV 101 Business Ethics I 3 FNSV 102 Business Ethics II 2 FNSV 103 Personal Finance 3 FNSV 105 Services Marketing 3 FNSV 107 Service Industry Accounting & Bookkeeping 3 FNSV 110 Basic Office Suite 3 FNSV 201 Business Ethics III 2 FNSV 203 Money Value 3 FNSV 205 Sales 3 FNSV 209 Principles of Investments 3 Total credit hours 46

Welding Technology

The Welding Technology program uses the National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER) curricula which is standardized to meet industry standards. NCCER maintains a National Registry which contains the training records of students who have received training through WNMU. The National Registry also gives students more flexibility in their career path planning and ensures that their training accomplishments will be recognized wherever they go. Students taking a course in the Welding Technology program will automatically be entered into the National Registry after completion of an approval form from NCCER.

CERTIFICATE - WELDING TECHNOLOGY

(34 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

CMPS 111 Computer Lit - PC 3

Welding Technology Core Requirements

WLDT 105 Oxyacetylene Welding 2
WLDT 120 General Welding Applications 3
WLDT 122 Basic Safety, Hand & Power Tools 2
WLDT 131 Metal Cutting Process 2
WLDT 155 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 3
WLDT 157 Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 3
WLDT 158 SMAW I Groove & Open V Butt Welds 4
WLDT 162 SMAW I Open Root Pipe & Stainless Steel 4
WLDT 166 Tig Welding 3
WLDT 202 SMAW II Groove & Open V Butt Welds 3
WLDT 204 SMAW II Open Root Pipe & Stainless Steel 2
   Total core credit hours 31

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN WELDING TECHNOLOGY

(68 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 Total credit hours 6

Welding Technology Core Requirements

WLDT 105 Oxyacetelyne Welding 2 WLDT 120 General Welding Application 3 WLDT 122 Basic Safety Hand & Power Tools 2 WLDT 131 Metal Cutting Process 2 WLDT 140 Rigging & Metal Properties 3 WLDT 155 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 3 WLDT 157 Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 3 WLDT 158 SMAW I Groove & Open V Weld 4 WLDT 162 SMAW I Open Root Pipe & Stainless Steel 4 WLDT 166 Tig Welding 3 WLDT 202 SMAW II Groove & Open V Welding 3 WLDT 204 SMAW II Root Pipe Open & Stainless Steel 2 WLDT 206 Mechanical Properties of Low Alloy Steel I 3 WLDT 208 GTAW Aluminum Plate & Pipe I 3 WLDT 210 GMAW Aluminum Plate & Pipe I 3 WLDT 212 GMAW Plate & Pipe 4 WLDT 255 Carbon & Stainless Steel Pipe Welding 5 WLDT 257 Mechanical Properties of Low Alloy Steel II 2 WLDT 260 FCAW Plate & Pipe 4 WLDT 265 GTAW Plate Aluminum Plate & Pipe II 2 WLDT 267 GMAW Aluminum Plate & Pipe II 2 Total credit hours 62

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION & ECONOMICS

Department Chair: Baldwin Professors: Baldwin, Counts, Little, Maskooki, Meares, Muncrief Associate Professors: McGee Assistant Professor: Visiting Professor:

Degrees: Bachelor of Business Administration with areas of concentration in Accounting, Business Management, and Management Information Systems; Bachelor of Applied Science in Operations Management & Supervision; Bachelor of Science in Public Administration; Associate of Science in Business Administration.

Built upon a base of course work in the arts, sciences, and humanities, the degree programs offered in the Department of Business Administration and Economics prepare students for careers in the business and public sector. These programs are designed to teach students how to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, become computer literate, and to develop management decision making skills.

Business Administration

Western New Mexico University, through its Department of Business Administration and Economics, is nationally accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs to offer the following business degrees:

Transferring the Business Discipline Module

To facilitate the transfer of courses within certain degree programs, New Mexico colleges and universities have collaborated to develop transferable discipline modules. These modules are made up of an agreed upon number of hours and courses. When discipline modules are taken in addition to the 35-hour general education core, (see the General Education section of the catalog) the total number of hours in a transfer module are approximately 64. Equivalent courses within these modules are identified with common course numbers as an easy reference point to guarantee transfer. Below is a list of courses taught at Western New Mexico University that make up the business discipline module and their respective New Mexico Common Course Number. Students wishing to transfer to WNMU should consult a similar list at their home institution for the common course equivalent

offered at that institution. WNMU# NMCC#

BSAD 230 ACCT 2113 BSAD 231 ACCT 2123 BSAD 331 ACCT 2133

CMPS 111 BCIS 1113

BSAD 100 BUSA 1113 BSAD 300 BLAW 2113 BLAW 2123

ECON 201 ECON 2113 ECON 202 ECON 2123

BSAD 370 BFIN 2113

BSAD 340 MKTG 2113 BSAD 350 MGMT 2113

MATH 321 MATH 2113

Title Principles of Accounting I (Financial)

Principles of Accounting II (Managerial) Intermediate Accounting Introduction to Computer and Business Apps Intro to Business

Business Law I

Business Law II Macroeconomics Principles Microeconomics Principles

Principles of Finance

Principles of Marketing Principles of Management Statistics

FOUR YEAR DEGREES

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

(no minor required) The Department of Business Administration and Economics offers the professional degree designed to prepare students at the entry level for careers in business accounting, marketing, and management. A Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.). The following requirements are for all prospective Business Administration majors:

  1. These majors may not take less than 40%, or more than 60%, of their course work in Business.
  2. To graduate with a degree in Business Administration, students must pass all courses required for a major or a minor with a grade of C or higher.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Credits 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major). Writing Intensive Credits 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

ECON 201* Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECON 202* Principles of Microeconomics 3
MATH 121* Mathematics for Business Applications I   
or MATH 131* College Algebra 3
MATH 221 Mathematics for Business Applications II 3
Extra Math/Computer Science Courses Required for B.B.A. degree
MATH 321 Statistics 3
CMPS 405 MIS for Managers 3
   Total credit hours 6
Business Administration Core Courses (required for all concentrations)   
BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3
BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3
BSAD 300 Legal Environment for Managers 3
BSAD 340 Principles of Marketing 3
BSAD 350 Principles of Management 3
BSAD 370 Principles of Finance 3
BSAD 451 Human Resource Management 3
BSAD 497 Business Policies and Management 3
   Total credit hours 24

Accounting Concentration (30)

BSAD 331 Financial Accounting I 3
BSAD 332 Financial Accounting II 3
BSAD 333 Cost Accounting 3
BSAD 334 Accounting Systems 3
BSAD 336 Fraud Examination 3
BSAD 430 Financial Accounting III 3
BSAD 432 Financial Accounting IV 3
BSAD 433 Tax Accounting 3
BSAD 434 Adv Tax Accounting 3
BSAD 435 Auditing 3
   Total credit hours 30

150 Semester Hour Requirement for Certified Public Accountants

Students who intend to sit for the CPA exam should be aware that the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants requires, as a condition to take the Uniform CPA Exam, the completion of 150 semester hours of college coursework. No restrictions have been placed upon the types of courses students may use to complete the 22 hours beyond the 128 hours that WNMU requires to obtain a B.B.A. in Accounting. Suggestions made by the AICPA include additional accounting courses, professional ethics and responsibility, globalization, research methodology, and communication skills. It is logical that those students who intend to become CPA’s should extend their four year program of study into the graduate level by obtaining an MBA. However, for those students who wish to become CPA’s but who are not interested in obtaining an advanced degree, the following program is recommended:

BBA in Accounting 128

Accounting electives 9 BSAD 510 Social Responsibility and Business Ethics 3 BSAD 556 Production and Operations Analysis 3 BSAD 586 Advanced International Business 3

Non-Business courses (communications skills recommended) 4 Total credit hours 150

New Mexico has imposed the 150 hour requirement to take the CPA exam in New Mexico. Students should discuss the latest requirements for taking the CPA exam with their academic advisor.

Business Management Concentration (30)

BSAD 355 Communication in Business and Industry 3 BSAD 441 Business Research 3 BSAD 445 Marketing Strategy 3 BSAD 452 Organizational Behavior 3 BSAD 461 Operations Management 3 BSAD 471 Intermediate Financial Management 3 BSAD 486 International Business 3 ECON 370 Applied Business Economics 3 Two (2) Upper Division Guided Elec. in BSAD, CMPS or ECON 6 Total credit hours 30

Management Information Systems Concentration (39)

CMPS 260 Computer Applications 3 CMPS 263 Databases 3 CMPS 333 Data Analysis 3 CMPS 362 Systems Analysis and Design 3 CMPS 365 Programming for MIS 3 CMPS 415 Advanced Concepts of Databases 3 CMPS 435 e-Commerce 3 CMPS 467 Information Systems Networking 3 CMPS 470 Topics in MIS 3 Credit hours 27

Other required upper division courses

BSAD 334 Accounting Systems 3 BSAD 355 Communication in Business & Industry 3 BSAD 461 Operations Management 3 ECON 425 Money and Banking 3 Credit hours 12 Total Credit hours 39

BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION

(no minor required)

The Bachelor of Applied Science in Operations Management & Supervision prepares the student for a career in a supervisory position in the area of their associate/technical degree.The associate degree is combined with a specialization in management to produce uniquely qualified managerial personnel.

The following requirements are for all prospective Operations Management and Supervision majors:

  1. The degree is primarily designed for students who hold A.A.S. or A.S. degrees in a technical area. Others who have earned 32 credit hours in a technical field or have successfully taken a NOCTI exam may apply.
  2. The degree includes the 24 credit hours of Business Administration Core, with an additional three credits of upper division BSAD courses required.
  3. Mathematics/Computer Science requirements: Students pursuing the B.A.S. degree must complete six credit hours of mathematics or computer science beyond the six credit hours of mathematics, and computer science used to fulfill the general education requirements.
  4. Students must obtain a grade of “C” or higher in all courses required for the major.

Associate degree at WNMU or other accredited institution

Further definition of the curriculum is not practical because of the diverse back

grounds of those who enroll in the programs.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Credits 41 Upper Division credits (outside the major are not required) 42 Writing Intensive Credits 12

CMPS 111* ECON 201* ECON 202* MATH 121* or MATH 131* MATH 221 Computer Literacy - PC 3 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Principles of Microeconomics 3 Mathematics for Business Applications I College Algebra 3 Mathematics for Business Applications II 3

Extra Math/Computer Science Courses Required for B.A.S degree

MATH 321 Statistics 3 CMPS 405 MIS for Managers 3 Total credit hours 6

Business Administration Core Requirements

BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 BSAD 300 Legal Environment for Managers 3 BSAD 340 Principles of Marketing 3 BSAD 350 Principles of Management 3 BSAD 370 Principles of Finance 3 BSAD 451 Human Resource Management 3 BSAD 461 Operations Management 3 BSAD 497 Business Policies and Management 3 Total credit hours 27

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

(no minor required) A Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with a major in Public Administration prepares graduates for employment in local, state, or federal government agencies. To graduate with a degree in Public Administration, students must pass all courses

required for a major or a minor with a grade of C or higher.
Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)
General Education Credits 41
Upper Division credits 54
Writing Intensive Credits 12
ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3
BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3
BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3
CMPS 111* Computer Literacy - PC* 3
ECON 201* Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECON 202* Principles of Microeconomics 3

GEOG 201/211* Physical Geography & lab or GEOL 201/203* Environmental Science & lab 4

GEOG 202* MATH 111* MATH 121* or MATH 131* MATH 221* POLS 201* POLS 202* Human Geography 3 Intermediate Algebra 3 Math for Business Applications I College Algebra 3 Math for Business Applications II 3 American National Government 3 American State Government 3

Note: GEOG 201/211 is a Social/Behavioral Science,

GEOL 201/203 is a Lab Science

Extra Math/Computer Science Courses Required for B.S. degree

CMPS 405 MIS for Managers 3 MATH 321 Statistics or SOC 323 Social Statistics (also listed as GEOG 323) 3

Total credit hours 6

Public Administration Core Requirements

BSAD 300 BSAD 334 BSAD 350 BSAD 355 BSAD 441 or SOC 302 BSAD 451 BSAD 452 ECON 403 POLS 401 or POLS 405 Legal Environment for Managers 3 Accounting Systems 3 Principles of Management 3 Communications in Business and Industry 3 Business Research Research Methods 3 Human Resource Management 3 Organizational Behavior 3 Public Finance 3 Public Administration American Constitutional Development

3 GEOG 342 or GEOG 382 or GEOG 400 or GEOG 401 or GEOG 403 Social Geography Urban Geography Population Analysis Human Environmental Interactions Economic Geography

Upper Division Guided Electives

Upper-division coursework is to be selected from the following areas: Criminal Justice, Economics, Business, Political Science, and Geography 12 Total credit hours 42

TWO YEAR DEGREES

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

(65 credit hours)

The Associate of Science (A.S.) in Business Administration prepares students for entry level positions in business, government and non-profit organizations.

Supporting Course Work

CMPS 111 COMM 110 ENGL 101 ENGL 102 Fine Arts ___ MATH 111 MATH 121 HIST ___

MVSC___ Computer Literacy - PC 3 Public Speaking 3 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 Composition and Rhetoric II 3 Fine Arts General Education 3 Intermediate Algebra 3 Math for Business Applications I 3 History General Education 3 Laboratory Science General Education 4 Movement Science Activity 1 Social Science General Education 3 Total credit hours 32

Business Administration Core Requirements

BSAD 100 Introduction to Business 3 BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 BSAD 300 Legal Environment for Managers 3 BSAD 340 Principles of Marketing 3 BSAD 350 Principles of Management 3 ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics 3 Total credit hours 24

Guided Electives in Business or Economics

Nine hours of coursework in business, computer science or economics 9 Total credit hours for degree 65

Minors

   Accounting Minor   
BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3
BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3
BSAD 331 Financial Accounting I 3
BSAD 332 Financial Accounting II 3
BSAD 333 Cost Accounting 3
BSAD 334 Accounting Systems 3
BSAD 430 Financial Accounting III 3
BSAD 435 Auditing 3
   Minimum credit hours 24
   Business Administration Minor   
BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3
BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3
BSAD/ECON Upper or Lower Division BSAD or ECON Elective 3
BSAD ___ Upper Division Business Electives 9
   Minimum credit hours 18
   Economics Minor   
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECON 370 Applied Business Economics 3
ECON ___ Upper Division Economics Electives 9
   Minimum credit hours 18
   Marketing Minor   
Core Requirements
BSAD 340 Principles of Marketing 3
BSAD 341 Consumer Behavior 3
BSAD 445 Marketing Strategy 3
   Total Credit hours 9

Guided Electives (9 credit hours) At least 3 credit hours must be from Category 1

Category 1: BSAD 342 BSAD 343 BSAD 344 BSAD 345 BSAD 441 BSAD 498

Category 2:

ART 210 ART 214 ART 216 ART 271 ART 303 ART 310 ART 371 ART 410 ART 411 CMPS 403 CMPS 430 CMPS 435 ECON 360 ECON 370 ENGL 320 ENGL 410 FNSV 205 SOC 302 SOC/PSY 406

BSAD 230 BSAD 231 BSAD 350 ECON 201 Product Marketing 3 Product Promotion 3 Product Pricing 3 Product Placement 3 Business Research 3 Special Marketing Topic 3

Photography I 4 Graphic Design Software II 4 Business and Legal Issues for Artists 3 Web Design and Typography 4 Electronic Art Imaging 4 Photography II 4 Computer Graphic Web Design 4 Photography III 4 Photography IV 4 Desktop Publishing 3 Computer Graphics 3 e-Commerce 3 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 Applied Business Economics 3 Creative Writing 3 Advanced Creative Writing 3 Sales 3 Research Methods 3 Social Psychology 3 Minimum credit hours 9 Total credit hour for minor 18

Public Administration Minor

Principles of Financial Accounting 3 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 Principles of Management 3 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 12

In addition to the above required courses, the student must select 2 elective courses (6 credit hours) from the following list:

CMPS 405 MIS for Managers (3)

BSAD 451 Human Resource Management (3)

BSAD 452 Organizational Behavior (3)

ECON 403 Public Finance (3) 6 Minimum credit hours 18

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE & CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY

Department Chair: Hayes Professors: Bourdette, Hayes Assistant Professor: Chavez Visiting Professor: Warren

Degrees: Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Chemical Dependency; Bachelor of Applied Science in Criminal Justice; Associate of Science in Criminal Justice; and Law Enforcement Academy Certification.

Criminal Justice Overview

The mission of the Criminal Justice Program at Western New Mexico University is to assist law enforcement and corrections agencies throughout New Mexico, the Southwest, and the United States by providing quality candidates for employment and by assisting agencies to become more efficient and effective in their role of administering criminal justice, maintaining order, and controlling crime in society.The Criminal Justice Program strives to fulfill this mission by offering a comprehensive program of education, two and four year academic degrees in Criminal Justice, and continuing education offerings designed to provide practitioners with opportunities to develop professionally.

Criminal Justice Degree Programs

The Criminal Justice Program offers a five month certificate program as well as associate and bachelor degrees. The two and four year degree programs provide students with a solid foundation in a liberal arts education. This foundation is strengthened through Criminal Justice courses which provide the professional orientation needed for employment in local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies. Students seeking a B.A.S. degree choose either a Corrections or Policing concentration depending on their career goals. Minors are not required but are recommended in fields such as Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Chemical Dependency, Computer Science, Spanish, Accounting or Public Administration.

Chemical Dependency

The Chemical Dependency degree prepares students for careers in areas of chemical dependency, counseling, prevention, administration, and research. Students will be able to be employed in public and private organizations as counselors, clinical directors, program directors, prevention, research, case managers, and managers in both adolescent and adult treatment programs.

FOUR YEAR DEGREES

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY

(no minor required)

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Credits 41 54 credits of upper division credits are required (6 credits outside of major) Writing Intensive Credits 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 PSY 102* General Psychology (prerequisite for core courses) 3 SOC 101* Introduction to Sociology (prerequisite for core courses) 3 SOC 102 Social Problems 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) Complete an additional six credit hours in Math and/or SOC 323 and/or Math 321, and/or Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements. Note: MATH 321 or SOC 323 is required in the list below.

Chemical Dependency Core Requirements

CHDP 201 PSY 301 SOC 302 CHDP 303 CHDP 304 CHDP 305 CHDP 306 CHDP 307 PSY 315/316 CHDP 322 SOC 323 or MATH 321 SOC 391 CHDP 403 CHDP 404 PSY 405 SOC 406 CHDP 408 PSY 412 CHDP 421 PSY 425 CHDP 465 CHDP 481 CHDP 487 Introduction to Addiction Counseling 3 Developmental Psychology 3 Research Methods 3 The Addictive Process 3 Helping Skills in Chemical Dependency 3 Chemical Dependency and the Family 3 Codependency 3 Special Populations in Chemical Dependency 3 Physiological Psychology & lab 4 Substance Abuse and Crime 3 Social Statistics (also GEOG 323) Statistics 3 Sociological Theory 3 Adv. Helping Skills in Chemical Dependency 3 Professional Principles 3 Psychology of Learning 3 Social Psychology 3 Annual Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors Inst. 3 Psychopathology 3 Dual Diagnosis 3 Theories of Personality 3 Pharmacology 3 Internship in Chemical Dependency 4 Group Dynamics 3 Total credit hours 71

BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Successful completion of the Bachelor of Applied Science degree program in Criminal Justice requires the following:

1. Students must pass all Criminal Justice and Chemical Dependency courses with a grade of C or higher.

2. Forty-two hours of upper division coursework is required. As this is a B.A.S. degree, upper division hours outside the major or minor are not required.

Supporting Courses (may count as General Education)

General Education credits 41 Writing Intensive credits 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 MATH 111* Intermediate Algebra (prereq for MATH 321) 3 PHSC 171/173* Forensic Science I 4 PHSC 172/174 Forensic Science II 4 POLS 201* American National Government 3 PSY 102* General Psychology 3 SOC 101* Introduction to Sociology or SOC 102* Social Problems 3 SOC 302 Research Methods 3 SOC 331 Criminology 3

Extra Math/Computer Science Courses Required for B.A.S. degree

MATH 321 Statistics or SOC 323 Social Statistics 3 One course CMPS or MATH beyond General Education 3 Total credit hours 6

Criminal Justice Core Courses (required by all concentrations)

CJUS 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CJUS 210 Police and Society 3 CJUS 230 Introduction to Corrections 3 CJUS 250 Courts and the Criminal Justice System 3 CJUS 260 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 3 CJUS 321 Criminal Justice and Minorities 3 Total credit hours 18

Corrections Concentration

CJUS 251 Institutional Corrections 3 CJUS 331 Corrections Law 3 CJUS 361 Community Based Corrections 3 Students must select fifteen credit hours of upper division criminal justice or chemical dependency elective coursework 15 Subtotal of Corrections Concentration 24

Policing Concentration

CJUS 205 Substantive Criminal Law 3 CJUS 222 Constitutional Criminal Procedure 3 CJUS 232 Criminal Investigation 3 Students must select fifteen credit hours of upper division criminal justice or chemical dependency elective coursework 15 Subtotal of Policing Concentration 24

Guided Electives

A total of 15 upper division credit hours are to be chosen from the following:

BSAD 331 BSAD 332 BSAD 333 BSAD 334 BSAD 350 BSAD 355 BSAD 430 BSAD 432 BSAD 435 BSAD 451 BSAD 452 CJUS/CHDP ___ CMPS 405 ECON 403 ENGL 419 GEOG 340 GEOG 382 HIST/POLS 311 HIST 348 HIST 421 HIST/POLS 497 POLS 312 POLS 353 POLS 401 POLS 405 PSY 301 PSY 315/316 PSY/SOC 406 PSY 412 PSY 420 PSY 425 SOC 259 SOC 313 SOC 333 SWK 320 SWK 331 SWK 332 SWK 370 WELL 464 Financial Accounting I 3 Financial Accounting II 3 Cost Accounting 3 Accounting Systems 3 Principles of Management 3 Communications in Business and Industry 3 Financial Accounting III 3 Financial Accounting IV 3 Auditing 3 Human Resources Management 3 Organizational Behavior 3 outside core or concentration required MIS for Managers 3 Public Finance 3 Advanced Composition 3 Geography of Latin America 3 Urban Geography 4 History & Politics of Modern Mexico 3 Latin American History and Politics: Mod. Period 4 Contemporary North American Indian 3 Hist. and Politics of the US Civil Rights Movement 3 Amer. Foreign Relations 3 International Law & Organization 3 Public Administration 3 American Constitutional Development 3 Developmental Psychology 3 Physiological Psychology & lab 4 Social Psychology 3 Psychopathology 3 Diagnostics and Evaluation 3 Theories of Personality 3 Sociology of Race & Ethnicity 3 Social Inequality 3 Sociology of Youth 3 Diversity in Social Work Practice 3 Social Welfare Policy I 3 Social Welfare Policy II 3 Child Welfare 3 Substance Use/Abuse 3 Total credit hours 15 Additional classes which are not listed above may be used to fulfill the guided electives requirements with the approval of the student’s advisor. However, the “Supporting Courses’’ may not be used to fulfill the guided electives requirement.

Credit for Police Academy Completion

Students who complete CJUS 101 and CJUS 102 with a grade of C or higher may apply those courses to substitute for the following credits towards a B.A.S. in

Criminal Justice:
CJUS 205 Substantive Criminal Law 3
CJUS 210 Police and Society 3
CJUS 222 Constitutional Criminal Procedure 3
CJUS 232 Criminal Investigation 3
CJUS 250 Courts and the Criminal Justice System 3
MVSC Activity Course 1
   Total credit hours 16

Students who have completed a New Mexico Department of Public Safety accredited academy program that began after July 1, 2002 and passed the LEOCE will be granted the credit for the 16 hours of coursework listed above which may be applied towards an A.S. or B.A.S. in Criminal Justice. Documentation of successful completion of a police academy and passage of the LEOCE will be shown by law enforcement officer certification issued by the New Mexico Department of Public Safety.

Transferring the Criminal Justice Discipline Module

To facilitate the transfer of courses within certain degree programs, New Mexico colleges and universities have collaborated to develop transferable discipline modules. These modules are made up of an agreed upon number of hours and courses. When discipline modules are taken in addition to the 35-hour general education core, (see the General Education section of the catalog) the total number of hours in a transfer module are approximately 64. Equivalent courses within these modules are identified with common course numbers as an easy reference point to guarantee transfer. Below is a list of courses taught at Western New Mexico University that make up the criminal justice discipline module and their respective New Mexico Common Course Number. Students wishing to transfer to WNMU should consult a similar list at their home institution for the common course equivalent offered at that institution.

WNMU# NMCC# NMCC# Name

CJUS 111 CRJI 1113 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJUS 210 CRJI 2103 Police and Society CJUS 250 CRJI 2503 Courts and the Criminal Justice Sys CJUS 230 CRJI 2303 Introduction to Corrections CJUS 205 CRJI 2053 Substantive Criminal Law CJUS 260 CRJI 2603 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency CMPS 111 BCIS 1113 Introduction to Computers and

Business Applications MATH 321 MATH 2113 Statistics

An additional six hours of lower division criminal justice or second language courses complete this module.

TWO YEAR DEGREES

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

(65-67 credit hours) Two options are available to students:

1. For those students who have completed the Law Enforcement Training Program (CJUS 101 and CJUS 102).

2. For those students who have not completed the Law Enforcement Training Program.

AS in Criminal Justice - Option I

(students who have completed CJUS 101 & 102 will be allowed 24 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 COMM 110 Public Speaking 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 ENGL 102 Composition & Rhetoric II 3 POLS 201 American National Government 3 PSY 102 General Psychology 3 SOC 101 or 102 Introduction to Sociology or Social Problems 3 MATH ___ 105, 106, or 111 3 PHSC 131/133 Essentials of Physical Evidence & lab 4 CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 MVSC Credit for completion of Law Enforcement Academy 1 Total credit hours 32

Additional Required Courses

CJUS 101 Law Enforcement Training Academy I 14 CJUS 102 Law Enforcement Training Academy II 10 CJUS 260 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 3 CJUS ___ Electives 6 APLT 150 Business Practices 2 Total credit hours 35 Option I Total 67

AS in Criminal Justice - Option II

(students who have not completed CJUS 101 & 102)

Supporting Course Work

ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 COMM 110 Public Speaking 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 ENGL 102 Composition & Rhetoric II 3 SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 POLS 201 American National Government 3

PSY 102 General Psychology 3 MATH ___ 105, 106, or 111 3 PHSC 171/173 Forensic Science I & lab 4 PHSC 172/174 Forensic Science II & lab 4 CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 MVSC ___ 103, 105, 109, 127, or 157 1 Total credit hours 36

Additional Required Courses

CJUS 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CJUS 250 Courts and the Criminal Justice System 3 CJUS 260 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 3 CJUS ___ Criminal Justice Guided Electives 18 APLT 150 Business Practices 2 Total credit hours 29 Option II Total 65

Certificate Program

Law Enforcement Training Program (28 cr. hrs.)

The Law Enforcement Training Program is a five month certificate program which meets legislative requirements for police officer training in the State of New Mexico. The training program is sanctioned by the Department of Public Safety. Students must complete the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the program.

Entry Requirements

  1. Psychological Exam
  2. Background Check
  3. Medical examination
  4. Physical Assessment
  5. COMPASS reading and writing scores of 40 or higher in each area (or completion of appropriate remedial work with a grade of C or better) or achievement of an ACT sub-score of 21 or better (or SAT equivalent of 500) in math, English and social science. The ACT/SAT must have been taken in the past five years.
  6. Valid drivers license
  7. U.S. citizen
  8. A minimum of a 2.0 grade point average is required for completion.

Program requirements

CJUS 101 Law Enforcement Training Academy I 14 CJUS 102 Law Enforcement Training Academy II 10 PHSC 131/133 Essentials of Physical Evidence & lab 4 Total credit hours 2

Minors Chemical Dependency Minor Core requirements

CHDP 201 Introduction to Addiction Counseling 3 CHDP 303 The Addictive Process 3 CHDP 304 Helping Skills in Chemical Dependency 3 CHDP 305 Chemical Dependency and the Family 3 CHDP 306 Codependency 3 CHDP 404 Professional Prin. in Chemical Dependency 3 Total core credit hours 18

Guided Electives: (select 6 credit hours) CHDP 307 Special Populations in Chemical Dependency 3 CHDP 403 Adv. Helping Skills in Chemical Dependency 3 CHDP 408 Annual Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute 3 CHDP 421 Dual Diagnosis 3 CHDP 465 Pharmacology 3 CHDP 481 Internship in Chemical Dependency 3-6 CHDP 487 Group Dynamics 3 Total guided electives 6 Total minimum credit hours 24

Criminal Justice Minor

CJUS 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CJUS___ Criminal Justice Electives (9 credit hours must be upper division level) 18 Minimum credit hours 21

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Dean: Manzanares-Gonzales Assistant Dean for Early Childhood: Anderson Professors: Frankland, Hall, Howard, Maguire Associate Professors: Franklin, Taylor Assistant Professors: Bustamante, Delaney, Harrey, Jaurequie, Horwitz, Tolar Visiting Professors: Cizek, Dirksen, Gomez, Hand, Schneider

The purpose of the School of Education at Western New Mexico University is to:

“Ignite and nurture a spirit of learning for both educator and student.

“Encender y alimentar un espíritu de aprendizaje

entre alumnos y maestros” (Spanish)

“Ba’ olta’ i doo olta’ i jiliigo o’ hoo’ aah bii’iistiin jidil tli’ go

naasgoo halled bee baa ‘ahwijiilyaa dooleel.” (Navajo)

“Tsit nah wah she oh nah...yah nit kay ah Tsit nah yah nit kay no nah...Tsit nah washe ah” (Zuni)

Prospective teachers, counselors, and administrators at Western New Mexico University are provided an opportunity to fulfill this purpose by experiencing a specific knowledge base. All School of Education programs maximize opportunities for student thinking and achievement and facilitate active, participatory decision making.

To the extent that this is a new way of thinking about the purpose of the work in the School of Education, it has implications for possible changes in the curriculum for teacher education, counseling, and educational administration. Therefore, this catalog may not accurately reflect the School of Education program changes that are occurring as the curriculum is restructured. The School of Education seeks feedback for program effectiveness from several sources: clinical faculty, university faculty, current students, employers of graduates, and, most importantly, graduates of the program.

Therefore, in the School of Education, the curriculum must be viewed as a dynamic set of experiences that is subject to change based on the continuous inflow of data, including New Mexico Public Education Department requirements. The School of Education will, when the data so indicate, request approval for curriculum changes during the catalog year. When curriculum changes are approved through the University structure, they will be assimilated into current degree plans.

The School of Education includes the Teacher Education Program, the Educational Leadership Program, and the Counseling Program. Classes are offered at the main campus in Silver City, Gallup Graduate Studies Center, Mimbres Valley Learning Center in Deming, and the Nadine Gardner Center in T or C.

The following degrees and certificate are offered by the School of Education: Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Family Support Associate of Arts in Early Childhood Education and Family Support Associate of Arts in Educational Assistant Bachelor of Arts in Education (Early Childhood, Elementary, Movement Science K-12 Pedagogy, or Secondary) Bachelor of Science in Education (Early Childhood, Elementary, Movement Science K-12 Pedagogy, Secondary or Special Educucation) Bachelor of Applied Science in Career and Technical Teacher Education Master of Arts in Counseling Master of Arts in Educational Leadership Master of Arts In Teaching

Teacher Education Endorsements

The Teacher Education Endorsements are university-wide with teaching fields in: Art (Elementary) Bilingual Education Business Marketing (Secondary) Classical Language-Spanish Earth and Space Science (Secondary) General Science (Elementary) Language Arts Mathematics (Elementary) Psychology Reading Social Studies Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Theater Wellness

Minors

Coaching

Majors and Licensure

For New Mexico licensure passing scores are required on sections of the New Mexico Teacher Assessments. A third test is required for Elementary Education, Reading, Early Childhood and most Secondary fields. All students should check with their advisors for their appropriate test(s).

Six undergraduate teacher education program majors are offered: Career and Technical Teacher Education Early Childhood Education Elementary Education Movement Science - K-12 Pedagogy Secondary Education Special Education

Each major has a corresponding New Mexico state teaching license. All students must complete a teaching field/endorsement in addition to the major requirements. All coursework used toward a teaching field/endorsement must be completed with a grade of C or better. No minor is required.

Professional Development Credit

Professional Development Credit (PDC) will be offered by Western New Mexico University (WNMU) for the purpose of professional development, enrichment, and salary advancement credit (T & E). PDC will be accepted only in special cases, for a maximum of six hours of WNMU degree credit toward program electives, with prior approval from the Professional Education Committee (PEC), the Dean of the School of Education, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. PDC courses are not part of WNMU’s approved programs nor are they appropriate substitutes. Professional Development Credits are not recommended for licensure and endorsement purposes. Transcript credit will identify PDC by the numbers 444 (undergraduate credit) or 544/545 (graduate credit) and a listing of the course title as Professional Development: “Title of Course.”

Admission Requirements

The School of Education has established admission standards for entrance into the Teacher Education Program. The higher expectations are set to assure that all licensed teachers graduating from WNMU are more qualified to maximize students’ thinking and achievement while maintaining an active, participatory classroom.

To be admitted into the School of Education all students must meet the following requirements:

  1. The first semester of enrollment in the Teacher Education Program is open to all interested candidates who have completed 45 hours of general education from an accredited institution.
  2. During the first semester of attendance in the Teacher Education Program, the student is required to register for and complete Foundation of Education with no grade lower than a C.
  3. By the end of the first semester in Teacher Education, each candidate must meet the following requirements:

A. Earned a Cumulative GPA of 2.5.

B. Completed ENGL 101, ENGL 102, PSY 102, COMM 110 and a general education Math course with a grade of C or better.

C. Completed a degree plan approved by the advisor of the School of Education.

D. Filed three letters of recommendations: two academic and one other, preferably an employer.

E. Completed a brief Educational Autobiography addressing, “why teach?”

F. Basic Skills of NMTA taken and passed.

G. For secondary, career and technical education and K-12 Pedagogy majors: endorsement by appropriate academic department faculty.

H. Completed TEP Application At the end of the open enrollment period, the Professional Education Committee will determine the enrollment status. Each candidate may be admitted provisionally, admitted or denied into the Teacher Education Program. Students must maintain a

2.5 and must have a 2.75 cumulative GPA prior to enrolling in the Capstone block of courses, with no grades lower than C.

Dismissal from Program

A student’s program status in the School of Education may be withdrawn for a good reason. The Dean has the authority to withdraw a candidate’s program status. An adhoc committee, appointed by the Dean, will make a recommendation, provided the committee determines there is just cause after a hearing. Just cause may include, but is not limited to: 1) any disciplinary action by the School of Education, 2) conviction of felony or misdemeanor of moral turpitude, 3) charges currently pending against a student alleging a commission of a felony or misdemeanor of moral turpitude, 4) false reporting of any claims, or 5) conduct which adversely affects the student’s suitability as a member of the academic/professional education community.

Curriculum

The curriculum of the Teacher Education Program is comprised of four areas: General Education, BA or BS requirement, Professional Core, and Teaching Field.

Other Requirements

Graduation requirements differ for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Applied Science and the Bachelor of Science. See UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS in this catalog.

The Teacher Education Program has the following New Mexico Public Education Department requirements beyond the campus wide general education hours: English - 3 credit hours, History - 9 credit hours, including History of New Mexico, and Lab Science from three separate disciplines:

Life Science: BIOL 101/103, 102/104, 202/203, 204/205, Physical Science: CHEM 121/123, 151/153, 152/154, PHSC 101/103, 171/173, PHYS 151/153, 152/154, 171/173, 172/174, Earth and Space Science: GEOL 101/103, 102/104, 201/203, PHSC 102/104, 115/116 Also, Special Education and Elementary Education majors will take MATH 301 and

MATH 302 for the B.S. degree requirements. This does not apply to majors in Career and Technical Teacher Education.

New Mexico Teacher Assessments

The New Mexico Teacher Assessments (NMTA) are comprised of three tests and must be taken in the following sequence in order for the student to continue in the Teacher Education Program. The Basic Skills test must be taken during the Foundation block and passed before entering the Application block. The Teacher Competency test and the appropriate Content Knowledge test must be taken and passed before graduation. Students may take the tests earlier than required by the Teacher Education Program. It is the responsibility of the student to take a copy of the test results to the School of Education. It is recommended that students complete the tests prior to Practice Teaching. Only the Basic Skills test is required of students in the Career & Technical Teacher Education Program and Associate Programs.

Practice Teaching and Placement

Candidates must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 to apply for Practice Teaching.

Practice teaching is the culminating field experience for all teacher education candidates. The general intent of this intense experience is to facilitate the transition from student to beginning teacher. It provides teacher education candidates the opportunity to assume the full-time responsibility of a classroom teacher under the supervision of a school based clinical faculty or cooperating teacher.

Students desiring a placement for Practice Teaching in locations other than in the Cobre, Deming, Hatch, Lordsburg, Silver City or TorC school districts must first obtain permission from the Professional Education Committee (PEC); this request needs to be in writing. Permission must be obtained from the committee prior to any contact with the desired placement. There are prerequisites for being allowed to teach outside the local area.

Teacher Education Exit Requirements

In order to exit the Teacher Education Program and receive a diploma and/or an endorsement for teacher licensure in New Mexico, WNMU students must provide the following evidence in their program portfolio for approval. These requirements represent the summative value of mastering the program outcomes of the Teacher Education Program.

  1. Professional Portfolio
  2. Case Study
  3. Action Learning Project
  4. Video Taped Lesson Analysis
  5. Developmental Progress Report
  6. Practice Teaching Summative Evaluation
  7. Complete all New Mexico Teacher Assessment (NMTA) with passing scores.
  8. Letters of Recommendation
  9. Teacher Educational Exit Survey (EBI-TEES) Detailed information may be found in Practice Teaching Handbook.

Teaching Endorsement Fields

A teaching license must have an approved teaching field. The first teaching field must meet specific requirements as outlined in the pages following the Degree Plan Requirements for each major. Additional teaching fields require 24 to 36 hours, 12 hours of which must be upper division for Secondary Education majors. All credit hours used toward an endorsement/teaching field must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Teaching field requirements, as well as program requirements, go into effect when the student has been admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

Secondary Education teaching fields may require additional exit requirements. Students must check with their content area advisor.

FOUR YEAR DEGREES

BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN CAREER AND TECHNICAL TEACHER EDUCATION (BAS)

The Bachelor of Applied Science in Career and Technical Teacher Education degree will prepare students for careers teaching career and technical subjects at the secondary and post secondary levels. The program is approved by the New Mexico Public Education Department for licensure of vocational teachers.

Specific regulations:

  1. The degree is primarily designed for students who hold A.A.S. or A.S. degrees in an applied technology/technical area.
  2. The program requirements shall include the associate degree or at least 45 credit hours in an applied technology/technical area, 41 hours of general education and 34 hours of professional education courses.
  3. Mathematics/Computer Science requirements: Students pursuing the B.A.S. in CTTE degree must complete six credit hours of mathematics, computer science and/or EDUC 402 beyond the six credit hours of mathematics and computer science used to fulfill the general education requirements.
  4. Competencies required for secondary licensure in career and technical teacher education will be taught within the professional education course work.
  5. A supervised classroom practice teaching experience in a secondary career and technical education program is required of all students.
  6. Writing Intensive Credits 12
  7. PSY 102 General Psychology 3

Professional Education Core Requirements (34 credit hours)

Contextual Foundation (10)

EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4

CTTE 403 Principles & Practices of Career & Technical Educ. 3

PSY 302 Educational Psychology

or PSY 405 Psychology of Learning 3

Application (9)

EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3

CTTE 422 Contextual Teaching & Learning in Career & Tech Ed

or EDUC 471 Secondary Curriculum and Instruction 3

CTTE 431 Coordinating Experiential Work-Based Education Progr. 3

Reinforcement (3)

CTTE 475 Methods of Teaching in Career & Technical Educ.

3

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and CTTE 493 are to be taken concurrently.

Capstone (12)

EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3

CTTE 493 Practice Teaching in CTE 9

Applied Technology Core Requirements (45-48 credit hours)

Transferring the Early Childhood Education Discipline Module

To facilitate the transfer of courses within certain degree programs, New Mexico colleges and universities have collaborated to develop transferable discipline modules. These modules are made up of an agreed upon number of hours and courses. When discipline modules are taken in addition to the 35-hour general education core, (see General Education Section of the catalog) the total number of hours in a transfer module are approximately 64. Equivalent courses within these modules are identified with common course numbers as an easy reference point to guarantee transfer. Below is a list of courses taught at Western New Mexico University that make up the Early Childhood Education discipline module and their respective New Mexico Common Course Number. Students wishing to transfer to WNMU should consult a similar list at their home institution for the common course equivalent offered at that

institution.
WNMU# NMCC# NMCC# Title
ECED 120 ECED 2152 Professionalism
ECED 125 ECED 1133 Family & Community Collaboration I
ECED 208 ECED 2183 Guiding Young Children
ECED 211 ECED 1122 Health, Safety & Nutrition
ECED 225 ECED 1143 Assessment of Children & Evaluation of
      Programs I
ECED 231 ECED 1113 Child Growth Development & Learning
ECED 232 ECED 2163 Curriculum Development & Implementation I
ECED 281 ECED 2162 Curriculum Development & Implementation
      Practicum I (Practicum for ECED 2163)
ECED 236 ECED 2173 Curriculum Development & Implementation II
ECED 282 ECED 2172 Curriculum Development & Implementation
      Practicum II (Practicum for ECED 2173)

B.A. or B.S. IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 ENGL 316 Traditional Grammar (as the extra English course) 3 HIST 111/112* World Civilization I or II 3 HIST 201/202* American History I or II 3 HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3 HIST___ History Elective 3 MATH 105/106* Math for the Liberal Arts I or II 3 PSY 102* General Psychology 3 SOC 101* Intro to Sociology 3 Lab Science from three separate areas*: (Life, Physical, & Earth/Space) 12

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6)

MATH 301 Understanding Elementary Math I 3 MATH 302 Understanding Elementary Math II 3

Early Childhood Education Professional Core Requirements

Contextual Knowledge (6) choose two BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3 RDG 453 Children’s Literature 3 SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 SPED 428 Curriculum & Methods in Special Education 3

Foundation (29) ECED 120 Professionalism 2 ECED 125 Family & Community Collaboration I 3 ECED 208 Guiding Young Children 3 ECED 211 Health, Safety & Nutrition 2 ECED 215 Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development 3 ECED 225 Assessment of Children & Evaluation of Programs I 3 ECED 231 Child Growth, Development and Learning 3 ECED 232 Curriculum Development & Implementation I 3 ECED 236 Curriculum Development & Implementation II 3 ECED 281 Curriculum Development & Implementation Practicum I 2 ECED 282 Curriculum Development & Implementation Practicum II 2 NMTA Basic Skills Test Passed

Application and Reinforcement (22)

ECED 315 Teaching Reading & Writing 3
ECED 321 Family & Community Collaboration II 2
ECED 325 Assessment of Children & Evaluation Programs II 3
ECED 331 Research in Child Growth & Development 3
ECED 381 Teaching Reading and Writing Practicum 1
ECED 423 Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum 3
ECED 472 Methods & Materials for the Early Primary Grades 3
ECED 481 Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum Practicum 2
ECED 482 Methods & Materials Early Primary Grades Practicum 2
Capstone (12)      
ECED 491 Early Childhood Education Student Teaching 12

NMTA Early Childhood Content Area

B.A. or B.S. in ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41

54 credits of upper division courses are required

Writing Intensive Credit 12

ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

ENGL 316 Traditional Grammar (as the extra English course)

or ENGL 320 Creative Writing

or ENGL 419 Advanced Composition 3

HIST 111/112* World Civilization I or II 3

HIST 201/202* American History I or II 3

HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3

HIST___ History Elective 3

MATH 105/106* Math for the Liberal Arts I or II 3

PSY 102* General Psychology 3

Lab Science from three separate areas*: (Life, Physical, & Earth/Space) 12

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:

SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

MATH 301 Understanding Elementary Math I 3 MATH 302 Understanding Elementary Math II 3

Elementary Education Professional Core Requirements (45 credit hours)

Contextual Knowledge (9) BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 PSY 301 Developmental Psychology or PSY 302 Educational Psychology 3 SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3

Foundation (7) EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4 NMTA Basic Skills taken and passed EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom

3

Application & Reinforcement (17)

EDUC 414 Elementary Instructional Planning & Assessment 2
EDUC 472 Elementary Methods and Curriculum I 3
EDUC 473 Elementary Methods and Curriculum II 3
RDG 410 Teaching of Reading 3
RDG 411 Corrective Reading Instruction 3
SPED 428 Curriculum & Methods in Special Education 3

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and EDUC 492 are to be taken concurrently. All NMTA tests should be taken and passed before Practice Teaching.

Capstone (12)

EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3

EDUC 492 Practice Teaching - Elementary 9

Elementary Education Teaching Endorsement Fields

For New Mexico State Licensure, students must qualify for a competency based teaching field (24-36 credits). Specific teaching field requirements are listed in the Undergraduate Teaching Fields section, later in this chapter.

B.A. or B.S. in MOVEMENT SCIENCES - K-12 PEDAGOGY

Supporting Courses (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41

54 credits of upper division courses are required

Writing Intensive Credit 12

ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

COMM 110* Public Speaking 3

ENGL ___ English Elective 3

HIST 111/112* World Civilization I or II 3

HIST 201/202* American History I or II 3

HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3

HIST___ History Elective 3

MVSC 141 Intermediate Swimming 1

PSY 102* General Psychology 3

Lab Science from three separate areas*: (Life, Physical, & Earth/Space) 12

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:

SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science,

and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics and/or EDUC 402 Computers in the

Classroom beyond the General Education requirements.

Professional Education Core Requirements (37 credit hours) Contextual Knowledge (9)

BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and EDUC 493 are to be taken concurrently. All NMTA tests should be taken and passed before Practice Teaching.

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology 3
or PSY 302 Educational Psychology 3
SPED 408 Introduction to the Exceptional Child 3
Foundation (7)      
EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4
NMTA Basic Skills taken and passed   
EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3
Application & Reinforcement (9)   
MVSC 425 P-12 Movement Sciences Curriculum 4
EDUC 474 Classroom Assessment 2
RDG 410 Teaching of Reading   
or RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3

Capstone (12)

EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3

EDUC 493 Practice Teaching - K-12 9

Movement Science K-12 Pedagogy Core Requirements (36 credit hours)

MVSC 213 First Aid 2 MVSC 240/242 Anatomical & Physiolgical Kinesiology & lab 4 MVSC 245 History and Philosophy of Movement Sciences 2 MVSC 302 Teaching Outdoors & Initiative Activities 2 MVSC 303 Teaching Individual & Team Sports 3 MVSC 327 Pedagogy in Movement Sciences 3 MVSC 341/342 Physiology of Exercise & lab 4 MVSC 343 Biomechanics 3 MVSC 400 Motor Behavior 3 MVSC 402 Adapted Movement Sciences 3 MVSC 408 Assessment in Movement Sciences 3 MVSC 427 Developing Teaching Skills in MVSC 4 Total credit hours 36

B.A. or B.S. in SECONDARY EDUCATION

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41

54 credits of upper division courses are required

Writing Intensive Credit 12

ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 COMM 110* Public Speaking 3 ENGL 419 Advanced Composition 3 HIST 111, 112, 201, or 202* 3 HIST 111, 112, 201, or 202 3 HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3 Lab Science from three separate areas* (Life, Physical, and Earth/Space) 12

HIST ___ History electives 3
PSY 102* General Psychology 3
THR 250* Storytelling 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science, and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics and/or EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom beyond the General Education requirements.

Secondary Education Professional Core Requirements (39 credit hours) Contextual Knowledge (9) BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 PSY 301 Developmental Psychology or PSY 302 Educational Psychology 3 SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3

Foundation (10) EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4 NMTA Basic Skills taken and passed EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3 SPED 428 Curriculum & Methods in Special Education 3

Application & Reinforcement (8) EDUC 471 Secondary Curriculum & Instruction 3 RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3 EDUC 474 Classroom Assessment 2

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and EDUC 494 are to be taken concurrently. All NMTA tests should be taken and passed before Practice Teaching.

Capstone (12)

EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3 EDUC 494 Practice Teaching - Secondary 9

Secondary Education Teaching Endorsement Fields

For New Mexico State Licensure, students must qualify for a competency based teaching field (24-36 credits). Specific teaching field requirements are listed in the Undergraduate Teaching Fields section, later in this chapter.

B.S. in SPECIAL EDUCATION

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirements 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required Writing Intensive Credit 12

ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 COMM 110* Public Speaking 3 ENGL 316 Traditional Grammar

or ENGL 320 Creative Writing or ENGL 419 Advanced Composition 3 HIST 111, 112, 201, or 202* 3 HIST 111, 112, 201, or 202 3 HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3 HIST ___ History electives 3 MATH 105*/106*Math for the Liberal Arts I or II 3 PSY 102* General Psychology 3

Lab Science from three separate areas* (Life, Physical, and Earth/Space) 12

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) MATH 301 Understanding Elementary Math I 3 MATH 302 Understanding Elementary Math II 3

Special Education Professional Core Requirements (43 credit hours) Contextual Knowledge & Foundation (13) EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4 EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3 SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 SPED 470 Nature & Needs of Persons w/ Learning Disabilities 3

Application & Reinforcement (18) SPED 428 Curriculum & Methods in Special Education 3 SPED 452 Families, School, Community Relationship 3 SPED 454 Evaluation & Assessment of Exceptional Children 3 SPED 456 Culturally Diverse Exceptional Children 3 SPED 469 Nature & Needs of Persons w/ Mental Retardation 3 SPED 476 Nat & Needs Pers w/ Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 3

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone: SPED 441 and SPED 451 can be taken concurrently.

Capstone (12)

SPED 441 Practice Teaching - Special Education 9 SPED 451 Behavior Management App. with Exceptional Children 3

NOTE: Students must be Highly Qualified in at least two content areas. Highly Qualified requires 24 hours (12 upper division, 12 lower division) in two of the following content areas: Content Areas: (Language Arts, General Science, Math, Social Studies) Must complete Language Arts and at least one other content area. Content Area courses listed below do not fulfill Secondary Education major requirements:

Language Arts

ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 ENGL 102 Composition and Rhetoric II 3 Select one General Education Literature Course 3 ENGL 316 Traditional Grammar and Usage or ENGL 320 Creative Writing or ENGL 419 Advanced Composition

3 ENGL 450 Secondary English Methods 3 RDG 410 The Teaching of Reading 3 RDG 411 Corrective Reading Instruction 3 RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3

General Science

BIOL 101/103 Biology for General Education I & lab or BIOL 102/104 Biology for General Education II & lab 4 BIOL 450 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 3 GEOL 101/103 General Geology I & lab or GEOL102/104 General Geology II & lab 4 GEOL 450 Inquiry Methods in Science 3 GEOL 480 Geology Workshop for Teachers 3 PHSC 101/103 Physical Science for General Ed. I & lab or PHSC 102/104 Physical Science for General Ed. II & lab 4

PHSC 480

Mathematics

MATH 105 or MATH 106 MATH 111 MATH 301 MATH 302 MATH 304 MATH ___ MATH ___

Social Studies

HIST 111 or HIST 112 HIST 201 or HIST 202 HIST 300 HIST ___ Physical Science Workshop for Teachers 3

Mathematics for the Liberal Arts I Mathematics for the Liberal Arts II 3 Intermediate Algebra 3 Understanding Elementary Mathematics I 3 Understanding Elementary Mathematics II 3 Mathematics for the Secondary Teacher 3 Two extra Math electives higher than MATH 111 6 Upper Division elective 3

World Civilization I World Civilization II 3 American History I American History II 3 History of New Mexico 3 One extra Upper Division History elective 3

ECON, GEOG, POLS and/or SOC Elective 3 ECON, GEOG, POLS and/or SOC Upper Division elective 9

DOUBLE MAJOR DEGREES

B.A. or B.S. in ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND MUSIC

This degree is a double major from the School of Education and the Department of Expressive Arts for elementary music teachers.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirement 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 COMM 110* Public Speaking

3 ENGL 316 Traditional Grammar or ENGL 320 Creative Writing or ENGL 419 Advanced Composition HIST 111/112* World Civilization I or II 3 HIST 201/202* American History I or II 3 HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3 HIST___ History Elective 3 MATH 105/106* Math for the Liberal Arts I or II 3 PSY 102* General Psychology 3 Lab Science from three separate areas: Life, Physical, and Earth/Space 12

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:

SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

MATH 301 Understanding Elementary Math I 3 MATH 302 Understanding Elementary Math II 3

Elementary Education Professional Core Requirements (45 credit hours) Contextual Knowledge (9)

BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3
PSY 301 Developmental Psychology   
or PSY 302 Educational Psychology   
SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3
Foundation (7)      
EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4
NMTA Basic Skills taken and passed   
EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3
Application & Reinforcement (17)   
EDUC 414 Elementary Instruction Planning & Assessment 2
EDUC 472 Elementary Methods and Curriculum I 3
EDUC 473 Elementary Methods and Curriculum II 3
RDG 410 Teaching of Reading 3
RDG 411 Corrective Reading Instruction 3
SPED 428 Curriculum & Methods in Special Education 3

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and EDUC 492 are to be taken concurrently. All NMTA tests should be taken and passed before Practice Teaching.

Capstone (12)

EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3

EDUC 492 Practice Teaching - Elementary 9

Music Core Requirements (69 credit hours) Department of Expressive Arts Advisor:

MUSC 100 Applied Music (2 per semester) 8

MUSC 300 Applied Music (2 per semester) 6 MUSC 102/302 Applied Music Lab (7 semesters) 7 MUSC 101/301 University Choir (7 semesters) 7 or MUSC 151/351 University Band or MUSC 106/306 University Orchestra or MUSC 171/371 Jazz Ensemble MUSC 121/123 Music Theory I & lab 4 MUSC 122/124 Music Theory II & lab 4 MUSC 221/223 Music Theory III & lab 4 MUSC 222/224 Music Theory IV & lab 4 MUSC 341 Instrumental Techniques (1 of each) B,P,S & W 4 MUSC 242 Vocal Techniques 1 MUSC 303 Fundamentals of Music for Elementary Teachers 3 MUSC 314 Elementary Classroom Music Methods and Observation 3 MUSC 362 Conducting I 2 MUSC 363 Conducting II 2 MUSC 411 History of Music I 3 MUSC 412 History of Music II 3 MUSC 422 Musical Form 2 MUSC 461 Instrumentation and Arranging 2 Total credit hours 69 Piano Proficiency (see Expressive Arts Department for information) Senior Recital (see Expressive Arts Department for information)

B.A. or B.S. in SECONDARY EDUCATION AND MATH

This degree is a double major from the School of Education and the Department of Math and Computer Science for secondary mathematics teachers.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 COMM 110* Public Speaking 3 ENGL 419 Advanced Composition (as the extra English course) 3 HIST 111/112* World Civilization I or II 3 HIST 201/202* American History I or II 3 HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3 HIST___ History Elective 3 PSY 102* General Psychology 3 THR 250* Storytelling 3 Lab Science from three separate areas: Life, Physical, and Earth/Space 12

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science, and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics and/or EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom beyond the General Education requirements. This requirement is fulfilled by the Mathematics core requirement.

Secondary Education Professional Core Requirements (39 credit hours) Contextual Knowledge (9)

BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3
PSY 301 Developmental Psychology   
or PSY 302 Educational Psychology 3
SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3
Foundation (10)   
EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4
NMTA Basic Skills taken and passed   
EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3
SPED 428 Curriculum & Methods in Special Education 3
Application & Reinforcement (8)   
EDUC 471 Secondary Curriculum & Instruction 3
RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3
EDUC 474 Classroom Assessment 2

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and EDUC 494 are to be taken concurrently. All NMTA tests should be taken and passed before Practice Teaching.

Capstone (12)

EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3

EDUC 494 Practice Teaching - Secondary 9

Mathematics Core Requirements (25 credit hours minimum)

CMPS 170 Computer Programming Fundamentals 3 MATH 131 College Algebra *3 MATH 132 Trigonometry *3 MATH 171 Calculus I 5 MATH 172 Calculus II 4 MATH 210 Foundations of Mathematical Thinking 3 MATH 271 Calculus III 4 MATH 321 Statistics 3 MATH 496 Senior Project and Seminar 3 Total credit hours 25-31

* may be waived for students with the proper background

Mathematics Education (Secondary) Concentration

MATH 304 Mathematics for the Secondary Teacher 3

MATH 327 Survey of Geometry 3

MATH 312 Computational Linear Algebra

or MATH 410 Abstract Mathematics 3 6 credit hours of upper division mathematics courses. 6 Minimum concentration credit hours 15

B.A. or B.S. in SECONDARY EDUCATION AND MUSIC

This degree is a double major from the School of Education and the Department of

Expressive Arts for secondary music teachers.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirement 41 54 upper division credit required Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 ENGL 419 Advanced Composition (as the extra English course) 3 HIST 111/112* World Civilization I or II 3 HIST 201/202* American History I or II 3 HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3 HIST___ History Elective 3 PSY 102* General Psychology 3 THR 250* Storytelling 3 Lab Science from three separate areas: Life, Physical, and Earth/Space 12

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science, and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics and/or EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom beyond the General Education requirements.

Secondary Education Professional Core Requirements (39 credit hours)

Contextual Knowledge (9) BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 PSY 301 Developmental Psychology or PSY 302 Educational Psychology 3 SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3

Foundation (10) EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4 NMTA Basic Skills taken and passed EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3 SPED 428 Curriculum & Methods in Special Education 3

Application & Reinforcement (8) EDUC 471 Secondary Curriculum & Instruction 3 RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3 EDUC 474 Classroom Assessment 2

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and EDUC 494 are to be taken concurrently. All NMTA tests should be taken and passed before Practice Teaching.

Capstone (12) EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3 EDUC 494 Practice Teaching - Secondary 9 Music Core Requirements (69 credit hours) Department of Expressive Arts Advisor:

MUSC 100 Applied Music (2 per semester) 8 MUSC 300 Applied Music (2 per semester) 6 MUSC 102/302 Applied Music Lab (7 semesters) 7 MUSC 101/301 University Choir (7 semesters) 7 or MUSC 106/306 University Orchestra or MUSC 151/351 University Band or MUSC 171/371 Jazz Ensemble MUSC 121/123 Music Theory I & lab 4 MUSC 122/124 Music Theory II & lab 4 MUSC 221/223 Music Theory III & lab 4 MUSC 222/224 Music Theory IV & lab 4 MUSC 341 Instrumental Techniques (1 of each B,P,S,W) 4 MUSC 242 Vocal Techniques 1 MUSC 330 Instrumental Music Methods and Observation 3 MUSC 360 Vocal Music Methods and Observation 3 MUSC 362 Conducting I 2 MUSC 363 Conducting II 2 MUSC 411 History of Music I 3 MUSC 412 History of Music II 3 MUSC 422 Musical Form 2 MUSC 461 Instrumentation and Arranging 2

Total credit hours 69

Piano Proficiency (see Expressive Arts Department for information)

Senior Recital (see Expressive Arts Department for information)

B.A. or B.S. in SECONDARY EDUCATION AND SCIENCE Biology Concentration

This degree is a double major from the School of Education and the Department of Natural Sciences.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Educaiton)

General Education Requirements 41 54 upper division hours are required Writing Intensive Credits 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 ENGL 419 Advanced Composition (as the extra English course) 3 HIST 111/112* World Civilization I or II 3 HIST 201/202* American History I or II 3 HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3 HIST___ History Elective 3 PSY 102* General Psychology 3 THR 250* Storytelling 3 CHEM 151/153*General Chemistry I & lab 4 GEOL 101/103* General Geology I & lab 4 PHSC 101/103* Physical Science for Gen’l Ed I & lab 4

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

MATH 321 Statistics 3 or Math and/or Computer Science above the General Educ. req. EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3

Secondary Education Professional Core Requirements

(39 credit hours including EDUC 402) Contextual Knowledge (9)

BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3
PSY 301 Developmental Psychology   
or PSY 302 Educational Psychology 3
SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3
Foundation (10)   
EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4
NMTA Basic Skills taken and passed   
EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3
SPED 428 Curriculum & Methods in Special Education 3
Application & Reinforcement (8)   
EDUC 471 Secondary Curriculum & Instruction 3
RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3
EDUC 474 Classroom Assessment 2

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and EDUC 494 are to be taken concurrently. All NMTA tests should be taken and passed before Practice Teaching.

Capstone (12)

EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3

EDUC 494 Practice Teaching - Secondary 9

Science Educ. - Biology Concentration Core Requirements (35 credit hours)

Department of Natural Sciences Advisor: Miller

PHSC 102/104 Physical Science for Gen’l Ed II & lab 4

BIOL 202/203 Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4

BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4

BIOL 254/256 Anatomy and Physiology I & lab 4

BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4

BIOL 310/312 Invertebrate Zoology & lab

or BIOL 311/313 Vertebrate Zoology & lab 4

BIOL 366/368 Genetics & lab

4 BIOL 442/443 Ornithology & lab or BIOL 448/449 Herpetology & lab or BIOL 451/453 Mammalogy & lab 4 BIOL 450 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 3 Total credit hours 35

B.A. or B.S. in SECONDARY EDUCATION AND SCIENCE Physical Science Concentration

This degree is a double major from the School of Education and the Department of

Natural Sciences.
Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)
General Education Requirements 41
54 upper division credits required   
Writing Intensive Credit 12
ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3
ENGL 419 Advanced Composition (as the extra English course) 3
HIST 111/112* World Civilization I or II 3
HIST 201/202* American History I or II 3
HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3
HIST___ History Elective 3
PSY 102* General Psychology 3
THR 250* Storytelling 3
BIOL 202/203* Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4
CHEM 151/153*General Chemistry I & lab 4
GEOL 101/103* General Geology I & lab 4
B.A. Requirements   
Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:   
SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252   
B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)   
MATH 321 Statistics 3
or Math and/or Computer Science above the General Educ. req. 3
EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3
Secondary Education Professional Core Requirements   
(39 credit hours including EDUC 402)   
Contextual Knowledge (9)   
BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3
PSY 301 Developmental Psychology   
or PSY 302 Educational Psychology 3
SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3
Foundation (10)   
EDUC 311 Foundations of Education 4
NMTA Basic Skills taken and passed   

EDUC 402 Computers in the Classroom 3 SPED 428 Curriculum and Methods in Special Education 3

Application & Reinforcement (8) EDUC 471 Secondary Curriculum & Instruction 3 RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3 EDUC 474 Classroom Assessment 2

All other core/professional courses must be completed prior to the last block of hours, Capstone. EDUC 436 and EDUC 494 are to be taken concurrently. All NMTA tests and should be taken and passed before Practice Teaching.

Capstone (12)

EDUC 436 Classroom Management 3 EDUC 494 Practice Teaching - Secondary 9

Science Educ. - Physical Science Concentration Core Requirements (34) Department of Natural Sciences Advisor:

BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 254/256 Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 4 BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4 BIOL 450 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 3 CHEM 152/154 General Chemistry II & lab 4 GEOL 315 Geology of New Mexico 3 PHYS 151/153 General Physics I & lab 4 PHYS 152/154 General Physics II & lab 4 PHSC 115/116 Descriptive Astronomy & lab 4 Total credit hours 34

School of Education Undergraduate Teaching Fields

(Note: Teaching Field courses may overlap with General Education or Professional Education Core areas.)

Art Education

(elementary only) ART 101 2-D Design 4 ART 102 Color 4 ART 103 3-D Design 4 ART 107 Drawing I 4 ART 211 Art Appreciation 3 ART 2__ Select one Introductory Studio Art Course: 4 (ART 205, 210, 221, 230, 241, 251, 261, 271) ART 425 Elementary Art Methods 3 Total credit hours 26

Art Education- secondary

Secondary Students may complete a double major in both Secondary Education and Art, or the option of earning a Bachelor of Arts or Science in Art or a Bachelor of Fine

Arts, and then obtaining the MAT requirements for teaching.

Bilingual Education

(Elementary & Secondary)

Spanish Bilingual Education (30 credit hours) BLED 401 Current Issues in Language Minority Education 3 BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 BLED 416 Indo-Chicano Cultures and Pedagogy 3 BLED 427 Linguistics 1 for L2 teachers 3 BLED 428 Linguistics 2 for L2 teachers 3 BLED 431 Language Arts in Spanish 3 BLED 434 Content Literacy in Spanish 3 BLED 441 English Language Acquisition and Development 3 SPAN ___ Upper division courses in Spanish 6 Total credit hours 30

Zuni Bilingual Education (30 credit hours) BLED 401 Current Issues in Language Minority Education 3 BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 BLED 416 Indo-Chicano Cultures and Pedagogy 3 BLED 421 Zuni Culture and Pedagogy 3 BLED 427 Linguistics 1 for L2 teachers 3 BLED 428 Linguistics 2 for L2 teachers 3 BLED 432 Language Arts in Zuni 3 BLED 435 Content Literacy in Zuni 3 BLED 438 Teaching Reading in Zuni 3 BLED 441 English Language Acquisition and Development 3 Total credit hours 30

Navajo Bilingual Education (30 credit hours)

BLED 401 Current Issues in Language Minority Education 3 BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 BLED 416 Indo-Chicano Cultures and Pedagogy 3 BLED 419 Navajo Culture and Pedagogy 3 BLED 427 Linguistics 1 for L2 teachers 3 BLED 428 Linguistics 2 for L2 teachers 3 BLED 433 Language Arts in Navajo 3 BLED 436 Content Literacy in Navajo 3 BLED 439 Teaching Reading in Navajo 3 BLED 441 English Language Acquisition and Development 3 Total credit hours 30

Business Marketing

(Secondary only)

BSAD 100 Introduction to Business 3 BSAD 230 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 BSAD 231 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 BSAD 300 Legal Environment for Managers 3 BSAD 340 Principles of Marketing 3 BSAD 350 Principles of Management 3 BSAD 450 Methods, Materials, & Org. in Bus. Mkt Teacher Prog. 3 CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 BOFT 110 Intermediate Keyboarding/Document Formatting 3 BOFT 120 Word Processing I 3 BOFT 241 Business Computations 3

Total credit hours 33

Classical Language - Spanish

(Elementary & Secondary) SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I and SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II

or SPAN 213 Spanish for Heritage Speakers I 3 and SPAN 214 Spanish for Heritage Speakers II 3

SPAN 301 or SPAN 302 SPAN 303 SPAN 308 SPAN 350 SPAN 410 or SPAN 411 SPAN 423 SPAN 425 SPAN ___

GEOL 102/104 GEOL 201/203 GEOL 301/303 GEOL 331/333

Spanish Literature I Spanish Literature II 3 Hispanic Culture 3 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3 Chicano Literature 3 Spanish-American Literature I Spanish-American Literature II 3 Spanish Phonetics 3 Applied Linguistics for Spanish 3 Upper division Spanish elective 3 Total credit hours 30

Earth and Space Science

General Geology II & lab 4 Environmental Science & lab 4 Rocks and Minerals & lab 4 Sedimentology

or GEOL 401/403 Hydrogeology & lab 4 GEOL 340/342 Field and Research Methods & lab 4 PHSC 115/116 Descriptive Astronomy & lab 4 General Education Lab Science Requirement (1 in each area) Life Science: BIOL 202/203, or 204/205 4 Physical Science: CHEM 121/123, CHEM 151/153, PHSC 101/103

PHYS 151/153, PHYS 171/173 4 Earth and Space Science: GEOL 101/103 4

Total credit hours 36

Ge neral Science

(Elementary only)

BIOL 101/103 Biology for General Education I & lab 4 BIOL 102/104 Biology for General Education II & lab 4 CHEM 121/123 Chemistry for Life & lab

or CHEM 151/153 General Chemistry I & lab 4

GEOL 101/103 GEOL 201/203 GEOL 301/303 GEOL 450 PHSC 101/103 PHSC 102/104

General Geology & lab 4 Environmental Science & lab 4 Rocks and Minerals & lab 4 Inquiry Methods in Science 3 Physical Science for General Education I & lab 4 Physical Science for General Education II & lab 4 Total credit hours 35

General Science

(Secondary only)

Secondary students complete a double major in both Secondary Education and Science Education, with a concentration in either Biology or Physical Science. Specific Lab Science courses are required for each concentration. Degree plans are listed in the Double Major section earlier in this chapter.

Language Arts Elementary Education (36 credit hours)

COMM 110 ENGL 296 or ENGL 297 ENGL 300 or ENGL 353 ENGL 304 ENGL 320 or ENGL 419 ENGL 415 or ENGL 451 RDG 410 RDG 411 RDG 412 *RDG 437 RDG 453 THR 250

Public Speaking 3
American Literature I (outside of Gen’l Ed req.)   
American Literature II 3
Heroic Myth and Legend   
The Novel 3
History of the English Language 3
Creative Writing 3
Advanced Composition   
Life and Literature of New Mexico 3
Literature of the American West   
Teaching of Reading 3
Corrective Reading 3
Diag. & Pres. of Reading for Diverse Learners 3
Literacy: Teaching Applications 3
Children’s Literature 3
Storytelling 3
Total credit hours 36

Secondary Education (36 credit hours) Select four of the first five courses, outside of the Gen’l Ed requirements ENGL 201 Introduction to Literature ENGL 293 English Literature I

ENGL 294 English Literature II
ENGL 296 American Literature I
ENGL 297 American Literature II 12
ENGL 316 Traditional Grammar and Usage 3
ENGL 415 Life and Literature of New Mexico 3
ENGL 419 Advanced Composition 3
ENGL 440 Shakespeare 3
ENGL 450 Secondary English Methods 3
RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3
   Upper division English electives with advisor approval 6
   Total credit hours 36
   Mathematics   
   (Elementary only)   
MATH 105 Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 3
MATH 106 Mathematics for Liberal Arts II 3
MATH 131 College Algebra 3
MATH 132 Trigonometry 3
MATH 171 Calculus I 5
MATH 301 Understanding Elementary Mathematics I 3
MATH 302 Understanding Elementary Mathematics II 3
MATH 321 Statistics 3
   Total credit hours 26
   Mathematics   
   (Secondary only)   

Secondary students complete a double major in both Secondary Education and Mathematics, with a concentration in education. The degree plan is listed in the Double major section of this chapter.

Music Education Students seeking a teaching endorsement in music have two options: The double major option for Elementary or Secondary teachers shown earlier in this chapter, or the option of earning a Bachelor of Arts or Science in Music and then obtaining the MAT requirements for teaching. See the Department of Expressive Arts for details.

   Psychology   
PSY 102 PSY 301 PSY 302 PSY 315/316 PSY 333/334 PSY 405 PSY 412 PSY 420 (Elementary & Secondary) General Psychology Developmental Psychology Educational Psychology Physiological Psychology & lab Experimental Psychology & lab Psychology of Learning Psychopathology Diagnostics & Evaluation Total credit hours 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 26

Reading

(Elementary & Secondary) RDG 410 Teaching of Reading 3 RDG 411 Corrective Reading 3 RDG 453 Children’s Literature 3 RDG 460 Reading Skills in Secondary Education 3 RDG 480 Reading Workshop 3 RDG 514 Theoretical Models of Reading 3 RDG 515 Remedial Reading 3 RDG 517 Early Childhood Reading 3 RDG 579 Seminar in Reading 3 RDG 581 Practicum in Reading 3

Total credit hours 30

Social Studies

(Elementary & Secondary)

ANTH 201 Cultural Anthropology 3 ECON 200 Basic Economics: Private Enterprise 3 GEOG 202 Human Geography 3 GEOG 205 World Regional Geography 3 GEOG 403 Economic Geography 3 HIST 300 History of New Mexico 3 POLS 201 American National Government 3 POLS 405 American Constitutional Development 3 SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 SOC 313 Social Inequality 3 ___ 496 Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences 3

(this course may be taken from any Social Science discipline) In addition, one course from the following list will be required (3 hours each): ECON 403 Public Finance ECON 425 Money and Banking GEOG 342 Social Geography GEOG 400 Population Analysis HIST/POLS 311 History and Politics of Modern Mexico HIST 365 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust HIST 409 Seminar in Local History HIST 421 Contemporary North American Indians HIST 422 Indians of the Southwest HIST 435 The Civil War and Reconstruction POLS 312 American Foreign Relations SOC 259 Sociology of Race & Ethnicity SOC 450 Environmental Sociology 3

Total credit hours 36

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages TESOL

(Elementary & Secondary)

BLED 401 Current Issues in Language Minority Education 3 BLED 414 Multicultural Education 3 BLED 416 Indo-Chicano Cultures and Pedagogy 3 BLED 427 Linguistics 1 for L2 Teachers 3 BLED 428 Linguistics 2 for L2 Teachers 3 BLED 441 English Language Acquisition & Development 3 BLED 445 ESL Methods for Content Literacy 3 Select one of the following: BLED 431, BLED 434, BLED 437 3 All students take 2 semesters of a language 6 Total credit hours 30

Theater Education

Elementary (24 credit hours) THR 110 Theater/Drama Appreciation 3 THR 136 Introduction to Theater Production 3 THR 211 Acting I 3 THR 212 Theater Production I - Backstage 3 THR 215 Rehearsal and Performance 3 THR 250 Storytelling 3 THR 325 Classroom Theater 3 THR 386 History of Theater 3 Total credit hours 24

Secondary Theater Education (36 credit hours)

THR 110 Theater/Drama Appreciation 3 THR 136 Introduction to Theater Production 3 THR 211 Acting I 3 THR 212 Theater Production I - Backstage 3 THR 215 Rehearsal and Performance 3 THR 250 Storytelling 3 THR 311 Acting II 3 THR 325 Classroom Theater 3 THR 336 Playwriting 3 THR 386 History of the Theater 3 THR 414 Play Direction 3 THR 450 Secondary Teaching Methods 3 Total credit hours 36

Wellness

(Elementary & Secondary)

Select a minimum of 24 credit hours from the following: WELL 162 Personal and Community Wellness Education 3

WELL 262 Introduction to Wellness Education 3
WELL 300 Nutrition/Diet Therapy 3
WELL 361 Introduction to Community Wellness 3
WELL 362 Curriculum in Wellness Education 3
WELL 450 Wellness Education Methods and Materials 3
WELL 460 Wellness Program Planning and Evaluation 3
WELL 464 Substance Use/Abuse 3
WELL 465 Wellness of the Senior Population 3
WELL 470 Human Sexuality 3
MVSC 213 First Aid 2
MVSC 240/242 Anatomical and Physiological Kinesiology & lab 4
   Total minimum credit hours 24
Minor      

Coaching

MVSC 215 Basic Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries 3 MVSC 218 Introduction to Coaching 3 MVSC 341/342 Physiology of Exercise & lab 4 MVSC 343 Biomechanics 3 MVSC 400 Motor Behavior 3 MVSC 406 Sports Psychology 3 MVSC 441 Principles of Conditioning 3 MVSC 445 Sport in American Culture 3 Total credit hours 25

TWO YEAR DEGREES AND CERTIFICATION EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND FAMILY SUPPORT

Western New Mexico University offers three programs in the field of Early Childhood Education and Family Support: Associate of Arts in Early Childhood Education and Family Support, Associate of Arts in Educational Assistant, and the Vocational Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Family Support.

Requirements for admission in the Early Childhood Education and Family Support Program beginning with the new program which started in August 2005 are:

  1. Prior to entering the Early Childhood Education program a student will complete an application for the Early Childhood Education program and for the Educational Assistant program.
  2. A student will be required to take the NM Teacher Assessment Test of Basic Skills within the first 9 hours of instruction in the early childhood course work.
  3. By the last semester of the Early Childhood Education Associate Degree Program or the Associate Degree for Educational Assistant, the candidate must have a passing score on the New Mexico Teacher Assessment Test of Basic Skills.
  4. A minimum of a 2.0 grade point average is required for completion.

The Associate of Arts Degree in Early Childhood Education and Family Support is designed to equip the student with knowledge and skills necessary to fulfill the needs of a variety of state and community programs including but not limited to:

This inclusive degree is designed to achieve competence in the areas defined by the New Mexico Office of Child Development. WNMU has participated with other New Mexico colleges and universities to develop a transfer module and common core competencies to facilitate the transfer of credit from one institution to another.

The Associate of Arts Degree in Early Childhood Education helps the student begin to attain credit and experience that will lead to the New Mexico Early Childhood License. However, the New Mexico License requires the courses typically available at both the associate degree and bachelor degree levels.

Individuals seeking the WNMU Vocational Certificate, which is a state recognized certificate, may graduate by completing the same core courses required for the Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education and Family Support plus 3 additional credits in either CMPS 110 or CMPS 111 (Computer Literacy).

Western New Mexico University also offers an Associate of Arts Degree in Educational Assistant. This program has been developed to give the students the foundation of early literacy and child development. The classes are designed to recognize the diverse population of our public schools and the meet the needs of the students in the variety of programs in southern New Mexico.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND FAMILY SUPPORT

(67 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

COMM 110 Public Speaking 3 CMPS 110 Computer Literacy - MacIntosh or CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 ENGL 102 Composition and Rhetoric II 3 HIST 111 World Civilization I 3 HIST 201 American History I 3 MATH 105 Math for the Liberal Arts I or MATH 106 Math for the Liberal Arts II 3 PSY 102 General Psychology 3 SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 General Education Lab Science from two different disciplines (Life Science, Physical Science, or Earth and Space Science) 8

Total credit hours 35

Early Childhood Education and Family Support Core Requirements (32)

ECED 120 Professionalism 2 ECED 125 Family and Community Collaboration I 3 ECED 181 Internship in Early Childhood Education 3 ECED 208 Guiding Young Children 3 ECED 211 Health, Safety & Nutrition 2 ECED 215 Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development 3 ECED 225 Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Program I 3 ECED 231 Child Growth, Development and Learning 3 ECED 232 Curriculum Development & Implementation I 3 ECED 236 Curriculum Development & Implementation II 3 ECED 281 Curriculum Development & Implementation Practicum I 2 ECED 282 Curriculum Development & Implementation Practicum II 2 Total credit hours 32

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANT

(65 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

COMM 110 Public Speaking 3 CMPS 110 Computer Literacy - MacIntosh or CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 ENGL 102 Composition and Rhetoric II 3 HIST 111 World Civilization I 3 HIST 201 American History I 3 MATH 105 Math for the Liberal Arts I or MATH 106 Math for the Liberal Arts II 3 PSY 102 General Psychology 3 SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 General Education lab science from two separate disciplines 8

Total credit hours 35

Educational Assistant Core Requirements (30)

ART 107 Drawing I 4 SPAN ___ Choose one of the following:

101, 102, 151, 152, 201, 202, 213, 214 3 RDG 137 Reading Literacy 3 MATH 112 Music Rhythm, and Mathematics 3 ECED 208 Guiding Young Children 3 ECED 211 Health, Safety & Nutrition 2 ECED 215 Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development 3 Individuals enrolled in the Early Childhood Education and Family Support Associate Degree programs, and who have successfully completed the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential may seek approval to use the CDA to substitute for one or more of the following courses: ECED 120, 181, 211, 221, and 231. Permission for such substitution will require review of the student’s work, CDA Portfolio and an interview with the Coordinator of WNMU’s Early Childhood Education and Family Support Program. Permission to substitute the CDA may be granted only by the EC Program Coordinator and will be documented on the student’s Program of Study

ECED 221 Designing Curriculum for Diversities in ECE 3
BLED 255 Current Issues in Bilingual Education 3
Elective Any 200 level Humanities Department Course 3
   Total credit hours 30

WNMU EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND FAMILY SUPPORT VOCATIONAL CERTIFICATE

Individuals seeking the WNMU Certificate (a state recognized certificate) may graduate by completing the same core courses required for Associate degree in Early Childhood Education and Family Support plus a Computer Literacy course.

Early Childhood Education and Family Support Core Requirements

ECED 120 Professionalism 2 ECED 125 Family and Community Collaboration I 3 ECED 181 Internship in Early Childhood Education 3 ECED 208 Guiding Young Children 3 ECED 211 Health, Safety & Nutrition 2 ECED 215 Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development 3 ECED 225 Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Program I 3 ECED 231 Child Growth, Development and Learning 3 ECED 232 Curriculum Development & Implementation - I 3 ECED 236 Curriculum Development & Implementation - II 3 ECED 281 Curriculum Development & Implementation - Practicum I 2 ECED 282 Curriculum Development & Implementation - Practicum II 2 Total core credit hours 32

Additional Computer Literacy Requirement

CMPS 110/111 Computer Literacy 3 Total certificate credit hours 35

DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSIVE ARTS

Department Chair: Smith (Art) Professor: Maya (Art), Metcalf (Art) Associate Professors: Ellis (Theater) Assistant Professors: Elder (Theater), Carey (Music), Converse (Music)

Degrees: Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Art or Music, Associate of Arts in Graphic Design Majors: Art, Music Minors: Art, Music, Theater

THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS DEPARTMENT encompasses the Fine Arts in Art, Music, and Theatre Disciplines, all of which contribute to the university’s mission of teaching excellence as its preeminent goal. The Expressive Arts Department has established its specific mission of embracing and encouraging self-discovery, acquiring skills, and knowledge of the creative arts.

ART DISCIPLINE

Art students enrolled at WNMU have options towards professional careers in the visual arts. The AA degree in Graphic Design leads towards the computer related workforce. The BA or BS degrees may lead toward art education or studio practices. The BFA Program requires an application process and a strong, competitive portfolio for admission and is designed as preparation for graduate study. Art as a discipline provides the facilities and assistance for developing competence in the visual arts, art education, art history, and the graphic arts.

MUSIC DISCIPLINE

The music program is designed to enable students to become skilled musicians while encouraging individual creativity. It is the conviction of the music discipline that well-trained musicians are able to both perform artistically as well as communicate articulately and knowledgeably. All music majors and minors take a core of courses calculated to develop artistic performance based on a thorough knowledge of the historical and theoretical basis of music of all periods. The curriculum includes instruction in the techniques of organizing and directing instrumental and vocal ensembles as well as teaching classroom music for kindergarten through twelfth grade.

The music discipline welcomes non-majors as members of all university instrumental and vocal ensembles.

THEATER DISCIPLINE

The theater program offers the student a basic knowledge of the theater arts in theory and practice. Theater courses also train the student in the procedures and techniques that will qualify him/her to act in, direct, or produce plays. Students working toward a minor in theater have at their disposal the facilities of a laboratory theater, including classroom, workshops, video and computer equipment, and wardrobe. Two major productions are presented yearly, in the Webb Theater or

F.A.C.T. with smaller performance opportunities as schedules and space allow.

Art Program

The art discipline offers several degree options: Interdisciplinary Master of Arts (MA), Bachelors of Fine Arts (BFA), Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science (BA/BS), Associate of Arts (AA) in Graphic Design, and an Art Minor.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (B.F.A.): a professional undergraduate program that prepares students as artists to exhibit technical competence in the visual arts. Students learn a broad knowledge of art and art history, sensitivity to style, creative and critical thinking, insight into the role of art in the life of humankind, and the ability to solve problems. Students seeking a BFA degree, enter by annual application only.

B.F.A. guidelines and application forms are available in the Expressive Arts Office. Applications are due by 12 noon on the first Thursday in April. The 84 Credit hours in art will provide professional specialization in studio art. Students will be prepared for graduate school to pursue the MFA Degree and to practice art professionally.

The Bachelor of Arts & Bachelors of Science (BA/BS): the degree offers 60 credit hours in art with specialization in studio art. Students will be prepared for graduate school to pursue the Master of Arts in Teaching and could pursue a MFA Degree or practice art professionally. No minor requirement.

Associate of Arts in Graphic Design (AA): The degree prepares students to enter the graphic design workforce. The program incorporates a broad art and design curriculum utilizing computer skills.

Art Minor: enables students majoring in other fields to acquire an art proficiency.

Art Scholarships: The DeGrazia Scholarship in Fine Arts, Francis McCray Scholarship, Lorraine Schula Scholarship, John Stermer Art Scholarship, Chase Web Art Scholarship: Each scholarship varies in amounts up to $500.00 per academic year. Art scholarships are awarded to incoming students with artistic potential and current outstanding Art and outstanding BFA students. Art scholarships are awarded each Spring for the following year. Scholarship Application Forms are available in the Expressive Arts Office. Completed applications are due by 12 noon on the first Thursday in April to the Expressive Arts Office.

Art Education Program Description: The Art Discipline within the Expressive Arts Department works in conjunction with the School of Education in two ways. 1) Students interested in attaining Art Certification are required to complete a BA/BS/BFA in Art and pursue a Master of Arts in Teaching with Art as their qualifying field. 2) Students interested in the Elementary Education Program take the 26-hour Art Teaching Endorsement in conjunction with the Elementary Education Program.

Music Program

The Music Discipline offers programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Music (education concentration), a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Music (jazz studies concentration) and a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Music (performance concentration), and a Music minor, as well as courses for graduate credit. These degree plans require a minor. All students considering a major in music should consult with a Music advisor and declare their intention with the Academic Support Center during their freshman year or as early as possible in their studies.

Recital and Piano Proficiency Requirements

All students pursuing a Music major are required to present and pass a Senior Recital and pass a piano proficiency examination in order to graduate. All recital performances must receive a passing grade from the music faculty jury. For further recital requirements, students should contact the department. To ensure adequate preparation for recitals, and as part of their professional training, students pursuing a Music Performance major are required to register for two credit-hours of Applied Music per semester on their primary instrument until they have successfully completed their recital(s).

Recital Attendance

All students who are registered for two credit –hours of Applied Music Study on a primary instrument are required to register concurrently for Applied Music Lab. Music majors are required to attend recitals and concerts during the course of each semester as determined by the Music Discipline. A current list of recitals and concerts may be obtained from the Department. Seven semesters of satisfactory attendance (a grade of C or better) in Applied Music Lab are required for students pursuing a teaching endorsement and eight semesters for students pursuing the Jazz Studies or Performance concentration degree.

Major Ensemble Requirement

All students registered for two credit-hours of Applied Music (except piano and guitar students) are required to enroll concurrently in a major ensemble, as determined by their Applied Music instructor. Piano, and guitar students are strongly encouraged to enroll concurrently in an instrumental or vocal ensemble. Students interested in a instrument loan should contact their instructors.

Applied Music Evaluation and Level Advancement

Applied Music students are evaluated, in part, through examinations conducted each semester by a jury of the music faculty. Students may register for 300-level Applied Music only after the music faculty have granted permission at a jury examination (normally after about four successive semesters of 100-level Applied Music study), or by permission of the instructor if the student has substantial prior experience and demonstrates appropriate ability.

Music Education Endorsement

Students desiring a Music Education endorsement for teaching in the public schools essentially pursue a double major in both Education and Music (education concentration) and should confer with advisors in both the Music Discipline and the School of Education. WNMU also offers a Master of Arts in Teaching which, coupled with the BA/BS in music (education concentration), can also lead to a Music Education endorsement.

FOUR YEAR DEGREES

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS DEGREE (BFA)

(no minor required)

Acceptance to this program is competitive and the applicant is expected to demonstrate creative ability with potential in the visual arts. If denied admittance into the program, the student may reapply the following spring.

Eligibility for BFA Admissions:

Portfolio: (20) images labeled 35mm slides or a CD - PC Compatible slide show and a list of works.

BFA Statement: (one page) BFA goals and art philosophy

Application Form: Available through the Expressive Arts Office

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirement 41

54 credits of upper division courses are required including 6 credit hours out

side of the Art discipline.
Writing Intensive Credit 12
(note: all Art History courses are designated as writing-intensive).   
ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

Bachelor of Fine Arts Core Requirements (84 credit hours) Art & Design ART 101 2-D Design 4 ART 102 Color 4 ART 103 3-D Design 4 ART 107 Drawing I 4 ART 114 Graphic Design Software I 4 ART 301 Life Drawing 4 ART 303 Electronic Art Imaging 4 Total Art & Design credits 28

Studio (select three of the following plus six upper division electives) ART 205 Non-Toxic Printmaking I 4 ART 210 Photography I 4 ART 221 Beginning Fibers I 4 ART 230 Papermaking I 4 ART 241 Clay I 4 ART 251 Painting I 4 ART 261 Sculpture I 4 ART 271 Web Design & Typography 4 ART ___ Six upper division studio courses (300’s-400’s) 24

Total Studio credits 36

Art History (select four of the following courses) ART 378 History of World Art: Women in Art 3 ART 386 History of World Art: Pre-Renaissance Art 3 ART 387 History of World Art: Renaissance/Baroque 3 ART 388 History of World Art: Contemporary Art 3 ART 389 History of World Art: Mexican Art 3 ART 480 Art Workshop 3

Total Art History credits 12

Additional BFA Requirements

ART 475 Art History Visual Thesis (Required) 1 ART 476 Portfolio 2 ART 477 Seminar (1 credit each, 2 semesters) 2 ART 481 Internship (45 hours in the field) 1 ART 492 Assessment of Conceptual Development 1 ART 493 BFA Exhibit & Final Portfolio Review 1 Total Additional BFA credits 8

Total BFA Core Requirements 84

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE in ART

(no minor required)

Art majors are required to present a senior exhibition during the last semester prior to graduation. See your advisor for guidelines. Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required including 6 credit hours outside of the Art discipline. Wititing Intensive Credit 12 (note: all Art History courses are WIC designated). ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science, and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics beyond the General Education requirements.

Art Core Requirements (60 credit hours)

Art & Design (select three of the first four listed, plus ART 301) ART 101 2-D Design 4 ART 102 Color 4 ART 103 3-D Design 4 ART 107 Drawing I 4 ART 301 Life Drawing (Required) 4 Total Art & Design credits 16

Studio (select three of the following plus five upper division electives) ART 205 Non-Toxic Printmaking I 4 ART 210 Photography I 4 ART 221 Beginning Fibers I 4 ART 230 Papermaking I 4 ART 241 Clay I 4 ART 251 Painting I 4 ART 261 Sculpture I 4 ART 271 Web Design & Typography 4 ART ___ Five upper division studio courses (300’s-400’s) 20 Total Studio credits 32

Art History (select four of the following) ART 378 History of World Art: Women in Art 3 ART 386 History of World Art: Pre-Renaissance Art 3 ART 387 History of World Art: Renaissance/Baroque 3 ART 388 History of World Art: Contemporary Art 3 ART 389 History of World Art: Mexican Art 3 ART 480 Art Workshop 3 Total Art History credits 12 Total Art Core Requirements 60

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE in MUSIC (Education Concentration)

For Teacher licensure students must obtain an MAT or Alternate Licensure in addition to this degree plan.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Educaiton Requirements

41 Fine Arts electives must be outside of the Music discipline 54 credits of upper division courses are required including 6 credit hours outside of the Music discipline. Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science,

and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics beyond the General Education
requirements.
Music Core Requirements (72 credit hours)
Applied Music (21 credit hours)
MUSC 100 Applied Music (2 per semester) 8
MUSC 300 Applied Music (2 per semester) 6
MUSC 102/302 Applied Music Lab (7 semesters) 7
Major Ensemble (7 semesters)   
choose from the following:   
MUSC 101/301 University Choir 7
or MUSC 106/306 University Orchestra   
or MUSC 151/351 University Band   
or MUSC 171/371 Jazz Ensemble   
Music Theory (23 credit hours)   
MUSC 121/123 Music Theory I & lab 4
MUSC 122/124 Music Theory II & lab 4
MUSC 221/223 Music Theory III & lab 4
MUSC 222/224 Music Theory IV & lab 4
MUSC 321 Counterpoint 3
MUSC 422 Musical Form 2
MUSC 461 Instrumentation and Arranging 2
Techniques (5 credit hours)   
MUSC 341 Instrumental Techniques (1 of each) 4
B-Brass, P-Percussion, S-Strings, W-Woodwinds   
MUSC 242 Vocal Techniques 1
Teaching (6 credit hours)   
Choose two of the following three:   
MUSC 314 Elementary Classroom Music Methods and Observation 3

MUSC 330 Instrumental Music Methods and Observation (secondary) 3

MUSC 360 Vocal Music Methods and Observation (secondary) 3 Conducting (4 credit hours) MUSC 362 Conducting I 2 MUSC 363 Conducting II 2

Music History (6 credit hours) MUSC 411 History of Music I 3 MUSC 412 History of Music II 3

Piano Proficiency (see department for information) Senior Recital (see department for information) 0 Total credit hours 72

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE in MUSIC ( Jazz Studies Concentration)

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirement 41 Fine Arts electives must be outside of the Music discipline 54 credits of upper division courses are required including 6 credit hours outside of the Music discipline. Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science,

and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics beyond the General Education requirements.

Music Core Requirements (85 credit hours) Applied Music (24 credit hours) MUSC 100 Applied Music - Major Instrument (2 per semester) 8 MUSC 300 Applied Music - Major Instrument (2 per semester) 8 MUSC 300R Applied Music - Improvisation (2 per semester) 8

Applied Music Lab (8 credit hours)) MUSC 102/302 Applied Music Lab (8 semesters) 8 Major Ensemble (8 credit hours)

MUSC 171/371 Jazz Ensemble (8 semesters) 8 Music Theory (29 credit hours) MUSC 121/123 Music Theory I & lab 4 MUSC 122/124 Music Theory II & lab 4 MUSC 221/223 Music Theory III & lab 4 MUSC 222/224 Music Theory IV & lab 4

MUSC 321 Counterpoint 3
MUSC 372 Jazz Theory and Arranging I 3
MUSC 373 Jazz Theory and Arranging II 3
MUSC 422 Musical Form 2
MUSC 461 Instrumentation and Arranging 2
Conducting (4 credit hours)   
MUSC 362 Conducting I 2
MUSC 363 Conducting II 2
Music History (12 credit hours)   
MUSC 112 History of Rock and Roll 3
MUSC 213 Survey of Jazz Styles 3
MUSC 411 History of Music I 3
MUSC 412 History of Music II 3
Piano Proficiency (see department for information)   
Senior Recital (see department for information) 0
Total credit hours 85
BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE   
in MUSIC ( Performance Concentration)   
Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)   
General Education 41
Fine Arts electives must be outside of the Music discipline   

54 credits of upper division courses are required including 6 credit hours outside of the Music discipline. Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science, and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics beyond the General Education requirements.

Music Core Requirements (65 credit hours) Applied Music (24 credit hours) MUSC 100 Applied Music (2 per semester) 8

MUSC 300 Applied Music (2 per semester) 8 MUSC 102/302 Applied Music Lab (8 semesters) 8 Major Ensemble (8 semesters)

MUSC 101/301 University Choir or MUSC 106/306 University Orchestra or MUSC 151/351 University Band or MUSC 171/371 Jazz Ensemble 8 Music Theory (23 credit hours) MUSC 121/123 Music Theory I & lab 4 MUSC 122/124 Music Theory II & lab 4 MUSC 221/223 Music Theory III & lab 4 MUSC 222/224 Music Theory IV & lab 4 MUSC 321 Counterpoint 3 MUSC 422 Musical Form 2 MUSC 461 Instrumentation and Arranging 2 Conducting (4 credit hours) MUSC 362 Conducting I 2 MUSC 363 Conducting II 2 Music History (6 credit hours) MUSC 411 History of Music I 3 MUSC 412 History of Music II 3

Piano Proficiency (see department for information) Junior Recital (see department for information) Senior Recital (see department for information) 0 Total credit hours 65

TWO YEAR DEGREE

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN GRAPHIC DESIGN

(64 credit hours)

Supporting Coure Work

ART 211 Art Appreciation 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 Total credit hours 6

Graphic Design Core Requirements

ART 101 ART 102 ART 103 ART 107 ART 114 ART 115 ART 205 ART 210 ART 214 ART 215 ART 216 ART 271 ART 272 ART 281 BSAD 100 or BSAD 152 2-D Design 4 Color 4 3-D Design 4 Drawing I 4 Graphic Design Software I 4 Electronic Imaging for Design 4 Non-toxic Printmaking I 4 Photography I 4 Graphic Design Software II 4 Design Portfolio Development 2 Business & Legal Issues for Artists 3 Web Design and Typography 4 Graphic Design Studio 4 Internship in Art 2 Introduction to Business Entrepreneurship 3 Total credit hours 54

Guided Electives (select one)

ART 207 Drawing II 4 ART 221 Beginning Fibers I 4 ART 230 Papermaking I 4 ART 241 Clay I 4 ART 251 Painting I 4 ART 261 Sculpture I 4 Minimum elective credit hours 4 Total credit hours 64

Minors Art Minor

(23 credit hours minimum)

Foundation (select three of the following) ART 101 2-D Design 4 ART 102 Color 4 ART 103 3-D Design 4 ART 107 Drawing I 4

Total minimum Foundation credits 12 Studio Courses (select two of the following) ART 205 Non-Toxic Printmaking I 4 ART 210 Photography I 4 ART 221 Beginning Fibers I 4 ART 230 Papermaking I 4 ART 241 Clay I 4 ART 251 Painting I 4 ART 261 Sculpture I 4 ART 271 Web Design & Typography 4 ART 301 Life Drawing 4

Total minimum Studio credits 8 Art History Courses (select one of the following)

ART 378 ART 386 ART 387 ART 388 ART 389 History of World Art: Women in Art History of World Art: Pre-Renaissance Art History of World Art: Renaissance/Baroque History of World Art: Contemporary Art History of World Art: Mexican Art Total minimum Art History credits 3 3 3 3 3 3
   Total minimum credit hours 23
   Music Minor   
   (26 credit hours minimum)   
MUSC 100 MUSC 101 or MUSC 106 or MUSC 151 or MUSC 171 Applied Music University Choir University Orchestra University Band Jazz Ensemble 4 4
MUSC 121 MUSC 123 MUSC 122 Music Theory I Music Theory I Lab Music Theory II 3 1 3
206 / department of expressive arts
   MUSC 124 Music Theory II Lab MUSC 411 History of Music I MUSC 412 History of Music II Electives (select four credit-hours from the following) MUSC 100/300 Applied Piano (1 credit each) MUSC 113/116 Class Piano I or II MUSC 126/127 Class Guitar I or II 1 3 3
MUSC 341 Instrumental Techniques (1 credit each)   
   B-Brass, P-Percussion, W-Woodwinds, S-Strings   
MUSC 242 Vocal Techniques (1) 4
   Total minimum credit hours 26
   Theater Minor   
   (27 credit hours minimum)   
THR 110 Theater/Drama Appreciation 3
THR 111 Introduction to Acting 3
THR 136 Introduction to Theater Production 3-6
THR 211 Acting I 3
THR 212 Theater Production I - Backstage 3
THR 386 History of the Theater 3
THR 336 Playwriting   
or THR 414 Play Direction 3
Electives (select at least one from the following)
THR 215 Rehearsal and Performance 3-6
THR 250 Storytelling 3
THR 311 Acting II 3
THR 325 Classroom Theater 3
   Guided Electives 3
   Total minimum credit hours 27

SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

The mission of School of Health Sciences and Human Performance is to prepare high-quality professionals for employment in various fields of health sciences, social sciences, and human performance. This mission is achieved while emphasizing and appreciating diversity in culture as well as learning styles. Student skills are maximized through use of appropriate technology, teaching styles, quality pre-professional experiences and community service. Upon completion of School of Health Science and Human Performance programs, students are capable of providing professional health/wellness services to both rural and urban areas in not only New Mexico and surrounding states, but also to areas throughout the United States.

The following degrees are offered by the School of Health Sciences and Human Performance:

Associate Degree in Nursing - ADN Associate Degree in Nursing - LPN to ADN Associate of Science Degree in Occupational Therapy Assistant Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing - RN to BSN Bachelor of Arts Degree in Rehabilitation Services Bachelor of Social Work

Minors offered by the School of Health Sciences and Human Performance include: Kinesiology Sports Medicine Wellness (in conjunction with the School of Education)

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING

Department Chair: McIntire Professors: McIntire Associate Professors: Alba, Escobedo, Shurts Assistant Professor: Brickley, Heidrick, Mosley, Turner

Degrees: Bachelor of Science in Nursing - B.S.N; Associate Degree in Nursing - A.D.N.

Western New Mexico University offers a RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing completion program and a two year nursing program leading to an Associate Degree in Nursing. Students who complete the A.D.N program are eligible to take the licensure examination for Registered Nurses.

FOUR YEAR DEGREE

RN TO B.S.N. COMPLETION PROGRAM

Western New Mexico University offers a RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Upon completion of the program, graduates will be prepared for positions in patient care, leadership, school health, and community health. The program is seeking accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120, phone: (202) 887-6791.

Program admission requirements:

  1. Graduate of an approved A.D.N. or Diploma program in nursing.
  2. Valid license as a Registered Nurse in the State of New Mexico or a Multi-state Licensure compact state.
  3. Cumulative GPA of 2.75.

Program requirements:

  1. Health insurance and immunizations must be current throughout the program.
  2. Valid certification in CPR throughout the program.
  3. Sufficient course work must be taken through WNMU to satisfy the resident credit requirement.

Transfer Credit:

  1. Graduates of Associate Degree Programs can transfer lower division credits to WNMU.
  2. Credit earned in a diploma program will be evaluated on an individual basis.
  3. Only college courses with a grade of C or better will transfer.
  4. There is no time limit on how long ago the nursing program was completed.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING

(no minor required)

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41

50 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major).

Writing Intensive Credits 12

BIOL 254/256 Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 4

BIOL 255/257 Anatomy & Physiology II & lab 4

MATH 321 Statistics 3

PSY 102* General Psychology 3

Upper Division Nursing Courses (36 credit hours)

NUR 325 Health Assessment 4
NUR 332 Nursing Research 3
NUR 336 Pathophysiology for Nurses 4

NUR 405 Family Systems 4 NUR 406 Critical Thinking in Professional Nursing 3 NUR 407 Leadership Roles 3 NUR 408 Issues in Professional Nursing 3 NUR 415 Health Care Policy/Ethics 4 NUR 429 Utilizing Resources 2 NUR 446 Community Health Nursing 6 Total upper division core 36

Nursing Electives (2 credit hours minimum)

NUR 304 Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2 NUR 410 Assessment Validation 2 NUR 432 Nursing Informatics 2 NUR 441 Perioperative Nursing 4 NUR 470 Nursing Organization & Management 3

TWO YEAR DEGREE

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Western New Mexico University is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway, 33rd Floor, New York, NY 10006, telephone (212) 363-5555, extension 153. The Associate Degree Nursing Program at WNMU is approved by the New Mexico Board of Nursing, 6301 Indian School NE, Suite 710, Albuquerque, NM 87110, telephone (505) 841-8340. It is a limited enrollment program. All students interested in applying for admission must first be admitted to WNMU as specified earlier in this catalog. Students may then contact the Department of Nursing to apply for admission to the program. All nursing students are advised by nursing faculty. All students admitted to the nursing program must have a minimum 2.75 grade point average. Students planning to apply for the program are encouraged to enroll in supporting courses if they are not accepted into the program.The number of supporting courses completed is also considered in the student selection process.

Students who have been convicted of a felony involving immoral behavior or substance abuse may not be eligible for licensure in New Mexico. Any individual who has a felony conviction should contact the New Mexico Board of Nursing prior to enrolling in the WNMU Nursing Program. If during the two year program, a student is unable to complete a clinical rotation because he/she is excluded from a facility for criminal record, he/she will not be able to complete the program.

Licensed Practical Nurses may be admitted to the Nursing Program with advanced standing on a space-available basis. Eligible LPN applicants must meet the following criteria:

  1. Completion of the admission requirements for the Nursing Program.
  2. The student must be a graduate of an approved school of practical nursing.
  3. The student must hold an active license to practice nursing in New Mexico.
  4. The student must have completed or received transfer credit for the supporting courses required in the Nursing Program.
  5. Students must submit transcripts to the Admissions Office at WNMU when applying for admission. The transcripts will be reviewed by the Transcript Evaluator and the Department Chair.
  6. Students who have graduated from a state approved school of practical nursing must submit their transcripts for review.
  7. The student must complete NUR 160/162 Nursing Articulation with a grade of C or better prior to enrollment in the second year nursing courses. Acceptance into NUR 160/162 Nursing Articulation Course is on a space-available basis.

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING STUDENT SELECTION CRITERIA Prerequisites:

Minimum G.P.A. of 2.75 (based on supporting courses below) CMPS 111 Computer Literacy-PC or 1 semester high school computer science Certified Nurses Assistant (CNA)

Supporting Courses: (completion with a grade of C or better):

COURSE Selection Points ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 4 MATH 125* Math for Health Occup or MATH 111 Intermed Algebra 4 PSY 102 General Psychology 4 PSY 301 Developmental Psychology 4 BIOL 254/256* Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 6 BIOL 255/257* Anatomy & Physiology II & lab 6 CHEM 121/123*Chemistry for Life & lab 6 BIOL 371/373* Microbiology & lab 6 WELL 300* Nutrition & Diet Therapy 6

* Indicates courses recommended to be completed within 5 years of application

GPA:

Student GPA (based on supporting courses above) is multiplied by a factor of 3 and added to the formula. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.75 to qualify for selection based on supporting courses.

Credit for Health Care Experience

EXPERIENCE 0-1 yr 1-5 yr 5 + yrs Certified Nurses’ Aide 1 2 3 EMT 1 2 3 Paramedic 1 2 3 Certified Medical Asst 1 2 3 Pharmacy Technician 1 2 3 OR Technician 1 2 3 Dialysis Technician 1 2 3 Medication Aide 1 2 3 Military Corpsman 1 2 3 Number of supporting courses completed, college GPA and health care work experience will be considered in the student selection process.

The deadline for receipt of application forms for the Department of Nursing is May 1st. Transcripts must be in the Admissions Office by April 1st of each year. Student selection will be completed by June 15th.

Entry Requirements

Current CPR Card

Proof of immunity of rubella (German Measles), rubeola (measles), and varicella (chicken pox) Negative TB skin test or chest X-ray Background check

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING - ADN

(72 credit hours)

Students must complete all course work with a grade of C or better to progress through the program. Students planning to major in nursing must see a member of

the nursing faculty for advisement and registration.
Supporting Course Work
BIOL 254/256 Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 4
BIOL 255/257 Anatomy & Physiology II & lab 4
BIOL 371/373 Microbiology & lab 4
CHEM 121/123 Chemistry for Life & lab 4
ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3
MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra   
or MATH 125 Math for Health Occupations (preferred) 3
PSY 102 General Psychology 3
PSY 301 Developmental Psychology 3
WELL 300 Nutrition & Diet Therapy 3
   Total credit hours 31
Nursing Core Requirements   
NUR 101/103 Fundamentals of Nursing & lab 6
NUR 150/152 Medical/Surgical Nursing & lab 8
NUR 170 Pharmacology 3
NUR 200/202 Maternal/Newborn Nursing & lab 5
NUR 210/212 Pediatric Nursing & lab 5
NUR 250 Health Care Issues and Trends 2
NUR 260/262 Mental Health Nursing and Leadership & lab 6
NUR 270/272 Advanced Medical/Surgical & lab 6
   Total credit hours 41

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING - LPN to ADN

(66 credit hours.)

Students must complete all course work with a grade of C or better to progress through the program. Students planning to major in nursing must see a member of the nursing faculty for advisement and registration. Students enrolled in this track must maintain licensure as a Practical Nurse in New Mexico.

Supporting Course Work

BIOL 254/256 Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 4 BIOL 255/257 Anatomy & Physiology II & lab 4 BIOL 371/373 Microbiology & lab 4 CHEM 121/123 Chemistry for Life & lab 4 CMPS 111 Computer Literacy - PC 3 ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra or MATH 125 Math for Health Occupations 3 PSY 102 General Psychology 3 PSY 301 Developmental Psychology 3 WELL 300 Nutrition & Diet Therapy 3 Total credit hours 34

Nursing Core Requirements

NUR 160/162 Nursing Articulation & lab 5 NUR 170 Pharmacology 3 NUR 200/202 Maternal/Newborn Nursing & lab 5 NUR 210/212 Pediatric Nursing & lab 5 NUR 250 Health Care Issues and Trends 2 NUR 260/262 Mental Health Nursing and Leadership & lab 6 NUR 270/272 Advanced Medical/Surgical & lab 6 Total credit hours 32

SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

DEPARTMENT OF ALLIED HEALTH

Department Chair: Cassel Associate Professor: Cassel, Leonard Assistant Professor: Harris

Degrees: Associate of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science Majors: Kinesiology, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Rehabilitation Services Minors: Movement Science Kinesiology, Sports Medicine, Wellness

This department offers a variety of Programs including Occupational Therapy Assistant, Bachelor of Arts in Rehabilitation Services, and Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Movement Sciences - Kinesiology. The focus of the department is to prepare students with entry level skills related to rehabilitation, occupation, and human performance. Details of admissions and course requirements for each program are detailed as follows:

FOUR YEAR DEGREE

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MOVEMENT SCIENCE - KINESIOLOGY

The kinesiology major is designed (1) to prepare students for careers in the fitness industry and (2) to provide a foundation for graduate study.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41

54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major).

Writing Intensive Credit 12
ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3
BIOL 101/103* Biology for General Education I & lab 4
CHEM 121/123*Chemistry for Life & lab 4
MVSC 141 Intermediate Swimming 1
MVSC 240/242 Anatomical & Physiological Kinesiology & lab 4
PSY 102* General Psychology 3
B.A. Requirements   
Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:   
SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252   

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

Complete an additional six credit hours in Math and/or Computer Science, and/or GEOG/SOC 323 Social Statistics beyond the General Education requirements.

Kinesiology Core Requirements

MVSC 213 First Aid 2 MVSC 215 Basic Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries 3 MVSC 341/342 Physiology of Exercise & lab 4 MVSC 343 Biomechanics 3 MVSC 400 Motor Behavior 3 MVSC 408 Assessment in Movement Sciences 3 MVSC 440 Exercise Prescription for Special Populations 3 MVSC 441 Principles of Conditioning 3 MVSC 481 Internship in Movement Science 3 NUR 170 Pharmacology 3 WELL 300 Nutrition/Diet Therapy 3 WELL 350 Wellness Programming and Program Management 3 Total core credit hours 36

Additional recommended courses

BIOL 102/104 Biology for General Education II & lab 4 BIOL 254/256 Anatomy and Physiology I & lab 4 BIOL 255/257 Anatomy and Physiology II & lab 4 MATH 321 Statistics 3 MVSC 218 Introduction to Coaching 3 MVSC 245 History and Philosophy of Movement Sciences 2 MVSC 406 Sports Psychology 3 MVSC 445 Sport in American Culture 3 PHYS 151/153 General Physics I & lab 4 WELL 464 Substance Use/Abuse 3 WELL 465 Wellness of the Senior Population 3

REHABILITATION SERVICES PROGRAM

Western New Mexico University offers a multidisciplinary degree program, culminating in a Bachelor of Arts in Rehabilitation Services. This degree is in direct response to the shortage of qualified Rehabilitation Professionals at the state, regional and national levels. Rehabilitation administrators indicate a large unmet need for rehabilitation professionals, especially those with bilingual skills and/or bicultural awareness. It is the multicultural environment of WNMU and the commitment to quality health and human services education that addresses this critical need for undergraduate training in rehabilitation services. Upon completion of the program, graduates will be prepared to enter a wide range of State and Federal rehabilitation settings, public and private rehabilitation agencies, or graduate education.

Program admission requirements:

1. Completion of University General Education Requirements

2. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 with no grade below a C in any major or minor class

Rehabilitation Services Administration Scholar Program

Western New Mexico University Rehabilitation Department is the recipient of a Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) Grant that provides scholarships and stipends to qualified students. Ten students may be funded annually for the duration of the grant. The intent of this program is to increase the number of rehabilitation professionals serving and representing underserved and underrepresented populations. Special consideration for receipt of this scholarship program will be given to persons with disabilities, persons of Hispanic heritage, and persons of Native American heritage. For information about this program contact the Occupational Therapy and Rehabilitation department at 574-5170

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN REHABILITATION SERVICES

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41

54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major).

Writing Intensive Credit 12
ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3
PSY 102* General Psychology (prerequisite for later courses) 3
SOC 101* Introduction to Sociology (prerequisite for later courses) 3
MVSC 240/242 Anatomical & Physiological Kinesiology (recommended) 4

(note: OTA 230 Functional Kinesiology in OT may be taken instead of MVSC 240) Completion of an approved minor (see list below) or Associate degree in Occupational Therapy Assistant.

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

Rehabilitation Services Core Requirements

CHDP ___ Any Upper Division Course 3 PSY 412 Psychopathology 3 OTA 160 OT in Growth and Development 3 OTA 255 OT Program Development 3 SPED 408 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 RHAB 310 Introduction to Rehabilitation 3 RHAB 320 Physical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disability 3 RHAB 321 Field Experience in Rehab 1 1 RHAB 322 Employment for People with Disabilities 3 RHAB 370 Communication for Health & Human Services Providers 3 RHAB 410 Assistive Technology in Rehab 3 RHAB 411 Field Experience in Rehab 2 1 RHAB 420 Case Management in Rehabilitation 3 RHAB 481 Practicum in Rehabilitation 6 Guided Electives (Advisor approved) 9 Total credit hours 50

Minors: One of the following minors or an Associate of Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant is required.

Business Administration

Chemical Dependency

Communication

Criminal Justice

Movement Science - Kinesiology or Wellness

Psychology

Sociology

Spanish

TWO YEAR DEGREE OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM

Western New Mexico University offers a two year program leading to an Associate of Science Degree, with an Occupational Therapy Assistant major. The program is fully accredited with the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE). Students who complete the program are eligible to take the National Certification exam for Occupational Therapy Assistants. Certification is conferred upon successful completion of the NBCOT exam. Most states require licensure in order to practice. State licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT exam.

The Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) program at WNMU is a limited enrollment program. All students interested in applying for admission should also apply to WNMU, as specified in the University catalog.

Admission Procedure

  1. Placement into or completion of English 101
  2. High school biology and algebra or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better
  3. Document a minimum GPA of 2.7 on high school transcript or on university transcript if the student has 15 or more college credits.
  1. Earn a “C” or better in all OTA coursework
  2. Complete all OTA coursework within 4 years
  3. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.7 in all courses required in the OTA Program
  4. Maintain current CPR certification
  5. Provide immunization documentation as requested
  6. Provide documentation of TB testing annually
  7. Maintain professional behaviors
  8. Honor the AOTA code of ethics
  9. Abide by all departmental and university policies

Admission With Advanced Standing

This option is available only to those students who have either previously been accepted to an OTA program at another institution, or have completed much of the coursework toward the OTA degree at another institution. Proof of admission or course completion is required, as well as a letter of reference from the director of that program. Students who were admitted to the WNMU program, but were unable to attend at that time, will also qualify for advanced standing. Coursework related to the OTA classes will be reviewed on an individual basis by the faculty. The faculty, the department chair, and the Admissions office must approve determination of transfer credits. The student will be required to complete the same program application process as a new student.

Transfer Students

Students wishing to transfer to the OTA program must be admitted to the University and submit official transcripts from the school they attended to the Admissions Office. Any student wishing to transfer to WNMU should review the academic regulations regarding transfer credit in the University catalog. The Transcript Evaluator and the Department chairperson will grant transfer credit after a review of transcripts. All transfer information is due by the May 15th deadline for application material.

Courses completed more than five years prior to entering the OTA program may or may not be counted towards the degree requirements, depending on individual review. Students wishing to challenge any course decision must follow the procedures outlined in the University catalog.

Program Accreditation

The Occupational Therapy Assistant Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. ACOTE’s phone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA. Graduates of the program will be able to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination.

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT

(77 credit hours)

Prerequisites: High School Biology and Algebra or equivalent with grade “C” or higher, completed within the past five years. High School Chemistry is strongly recommended.

Supporting Course Work

Supporting course work requirements do NOT have to be completed prior to entering the OTA Program.)

BIOL 254/256 Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 4
BIOL 255/257 Anatomy & Physiology II & lab 4
COMM 110 Public Speaking 3
ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3
PSY 102 General Psychology 3
RHAB 340 Medical Terminology and Documentation 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
   Guided elective (advisor approved) 3
   Total credit hours 26
Occupational Therapy Core Requirements   
OTA 155 Orientation to Occupational Therapy 3
OTA 156 Fieldwork Level Ia 1
OTA 160 OT in Growth & Development 3
OTA 161 Fieldwork Level Ib 1
OTA 165 Principles of Occupational Therapy 3
OTA 220 OT Therapeutic Media 3
OTA 223 Fieldwork Level Ic 2
OTA 230 Functional Kinesiology in OT 3
OTA 240 OT in Physical Disabilities I 3
OTA 241 OT in Physical Disabilities II 3
OTA 242 OT in Psychosocial Dysfunction 3
OTA 245 Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 3
OTA 250 OT in Geriatric Practice   
OTA 255 Occupational Therapy Program Development 3
OTA 256 Fieldwork Level Id 2
OTA 270 Fieldwork Level IIa 6
OTA 272 Fieldwork Level IIb 6
   Total credit hours 51

Students must obtain a TB test and complete a course in CPR prior to assignment of field-work experiences. In addition, students must have basic computer skills such as word processing, spreadsheets, and simple database management.

In addition to two years of classroom training, students must complete two full time clinical experiences (Fieldwork Level II). Each clinical experience will continue for eight weeks. These clinical experiences are unpaid and will require temporary relocation. All students are required to complete these clinical experiences within 18 months following the classroom courses. All coursework must be completed within five years.

Minors

MS Kinesiology Minor

(18 credit hours)

MVSC 213 First Aid 2 MVSC 215 Basic Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries 3 MVSC 341/342 Physiology of Exercise & lab 4 MVSC 343 Biomechanics 3 MVSC 400 Motor Behavior 3 WELL 300 Nutrition/Diet Therapy 3 Total credit hours 18

Additional recommended courses

MVSC 218 Introduction to Coaching 3

MVSC 441 Principles of Conditioning 3

Sports Medicine Minor

(25 credit hours)

MVSC 213 First Aid 2

MVSC 215 Basic Prevention & Treatment of Athletic Injuries 3

MVSC 220 Advanced Athletic Training 3

MVSC 240/242 Anatomical & Physiological Kinesiology & lab 4

MVSC 341/342 Physiology of Exercise & lab 4

MVSC 343 Biomechanics 3

MVSC 381 Internship - Sports Medicine 3

WELL 300 Nutrition/Diet Therapy

or WELL 464 Substance Use/Abuse 3

Total credit hours 25

220 / school of health sciences & human performance
dept of allied health
Wellness
Select a minimum of 24 credit hours from the following:
WELL 162 Personal and Community Wellness Education 3
WELL 262 Introduction to Wellness Education 3
WELL 300 Nutrition/Diet Therapy 3
WELL 361 Introduction to Community Wellness 3
WELL 362 Curriculum in Wellness Education 3
WELL 450 Wellness Education Methods and Materials 3
WELL 460 Wellness Program Planning and Evaluation 3
WELL 464 Substance Use/Abuse 3
WELL 465 Wellness of the Senior Population 3
WELL 470 Human Sexuality 3
MVSC 213 First Aid 2
MVSC 240/242 Anatomical and Physiological Kinesiology & lab 4
Total minimum credit hours 24

SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK

Department Chair: Walker Associate Professor: Walker Assistant Professor: Williams

Degree: Bachelor of Social Work

Mission Statement

The Social Work Program is designed to build upon the University’s commitment to provide an education to a population that is diverse in age, culture, language, and ethnic background. The diverse multicultural and multilingual populations of this rural area underscore the importance of understanding, addressing and overcoming the mechanisms of individual and institutional discrimination and the inequalities that result. The Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) provides a framework and guide for the obligations and practice for participants.

Given the program’s context, it is the mission of the Department of Social Work to promote leadership in the area by enhancing knowledgeable professional social work practice in a remote rural area, with a diverse population, while relying on the effective use of professional values and ethics. The program will encourage the use of advanced technology, emphasize the development of practice-relevant knowledge, and focus on social change in increasingly larger systems so that social and economic justice can be achieved.

Accreditation

The program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Admissions Information

Students must achieve a C or better grade in SWK 101 prior to applying to the Social Work program. In addition, students must have a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA prior to being admitted to the program. Admission packets are available from the Department of Social Work. Students must complete the Social Work program admission process prior to enrolling in SWK 386, Social Work Practice I. Academic credit for life or previous work experience will not be awarded.

FOUR YEAR DEGREE

Bachelor of Social Work

(no minor required)

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major) Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 BIOL 101/103* & 102/104* Biology for General Education I & II or MVSC 240/242 Anatomical and Physiological Kinesiology 8 plus one other lab science MATH 321 Statistics 3 POLS 201* American National Government 3 PSY 102* General Psychology 3 PSY Any Upper Division Psychology course 3 SOC 101* Introduction to Sociology 3

B.S.W. Requirements

Complete six credit hours in a language other than English or its equivalent.

Social Work Core Requirements

SWK 101 Intro to Social Welfare & Social Work 3 SWK 300 Human Behavior & the Social Environment I 3 SWK 301 Human Behavior & the Social Environment II 3 SWK 320 Diversity in Social Work Practice 3 SWK 331 Social Welfare Policy I 3 SWK 386 Social Work Practice I 3 SWK 422 Social Welfare Policy II 3 SWK 460 Social Work Research Methods 3 SWK 461 Social Work Research Project 2 SWK 487 Social Work Practice II 3 SWK 488 Social Work Practice III 3 SWK 491 Social Work Field Placement Seminar I 1 SWK 492 Social Work Field Placement I (Corequisite with SWK 491) 6 SWK 498 Social Work Field Placement Seminar II 1 SWK 499 Social Work Field Placement II (Corequisite with SWK 498) 6 Total core credit hours 46

Guided Electives

Electives must be approved by the Social Work advisor 12

DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES

Department Chair: Hall Professors: Baumhover, Cano, Griffin, Hall, Heller, Leen, Russell, Toth, Wallet-Ortiz Associate Professors: Trillo, Welsh Assistant Professors:

Degrees: Bachelor of Arts Majors: English, Spanish Minors: English, Latin American Studies, Pre-Law, Spanish

The Humanities Department offers courses and programs which focus on human experience in its own terms — as in literature and philosophy. These courses and programs may be used as preparation for careers in law, government, and teaching, but they are also essential to the critical thinking, value formation, and political decision-making required of citizens in a democratic society. The courses are designed for students choosing electives as well as for majors and minors.

The humanities curriculum is meant to function as a complement to curricula which are excessively specialized on one hand and exclusively practical on the other. It is committed to the cultivation of a thoughtful, broad, historical perspective; knowledge as an end-in-itself; and an awareness of the special value of human beings and their experiences — past, present, and future.

Students pursing the B.A. degree are advised to begin studying a foreign language in year one of their curriculum.

The Humanities Department includes courses in developmental reading and writing, Chicano Studies, Communication, English language and literature, Philosophy, and Spanish language and literature. There are also two honors societies in the Humanities Department: Sigma Tau Delta and Sigma Delta Pi.

Developmental Reading and Writing

Undergraduate students new to WNMU are required to take the COMPASS placement test. COMPASS test scores are used to place students in appropriate university or developmental writing, reading and mathematics courses. Developmental Studies courses provide underprepared and “at risk” students with academic support to complete the transition from high school to college. They also provide academic support to non-traditional students who have been away from formal education for several years. Students must pass each developmental reading and/ or writing course with a “C” or better in order to move on to the next level.

Chicano Studies

Chicano Studies courses are designed to give students an insight into the Chicano culture by exposing them to language issues, history, art, music, politics, literature and other areas in which the Chicano has been impacted by mainstream American culture and vice-versa.

Languages

English language and composition courses focus on writing as a tool of effective communication as well as the structure and development of the English language. Spanish courses are designed to provide a basic knowledge of the structure of the language and to teach the student to understand, speak, read and write Spanish.

Latin American Studies

The Latin America Studies Minor is designed to allow students to focus their studies toward the Latin American arena and prepare for a career in this sphere. The minor is comprised of 18 hours from a specific list of courses. These courses deal with Latin American/Hispanic issues. At least, 12 of the 18 hours must be at the upper division level. At least one upper division course is required in Political Science, Science or History and one in Spanish.

Literature

These courses in American, British and World Literature sharpen critical and aesthetic insights and promote understanding of the cultural heritage as revealed in literature.They provide a strong foundation in subject matter for prospective teachers of English in the elementary and secondary schools and equip majors for graduate study in English.

Philosophy

Philosophy courses serve to provide students with conceptual skills needed to think critically and to confront fundamental questions in their lives. Historical and contemporary approaches to problems are presented.

Pre-Law

Requirements for pre-law training vary among the law schools from three years to the completion of the bachelor’s degree. The American Bar Association does not recommend to the law schools exactly what courses should be included for pre-professional education. High on the list of courses recommended by leaders of the legal profession, however, are English language and literature, government, communication, economics, American history, and English history. Majors in English, Spanish, and History are all recommended backgrounds for law school.

Spanish

Spanish offers a wide variety of courses in the Spanish language, literature and culture.These studies are practical since New Mexico lies at the gateway to Hispanic America, with the abundance of possible careers which such a situation implies. The study of Spanish is also intellectually broadening as it can provide much information about the cultural heritage of a large segment of our own population as well as the millions of our neighbors to the south.

Teacher Licensure

Students seeking teacher licensure in the state of New Mexico may combine a major in Elementary Education or Secondary Education with a teaching field in Bilingual Education - Spanish, Classical Language - Spanish, or Language Arts. Specific course listings are found in the Teaching Field section of the School of Education in this catalog.

FOUR YEAR DEGREES

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH

Supporting Course work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41

54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of ENGL)

Writing Intensive Creidt 12

Humanities electives must be outside of the English core requirements.

ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:

SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

English Core Requirements (must be completed with a minimum grade of C)

ENGL 201 Introduction to Literature 3
ENGL 293 English Literature I 3
ENGL 294 English Literature II 3
ENGL 296 American Literature I 3
ENGL 297 American Literature II 3
ENGL 440 Shakespeare 3
ENGL ___ Guided Electives (15 credits must be upper division) 18
   Total credit hours 36

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH

Supporting Coure Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of SPAN and Minor area). Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

Spanish Core Requirements (30 credit hours)

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II
or SPAN 214 Spanish for Heritage Speakers II 3
SPAN 301 Survey of Spanish Literature I   
or SPAN 302 Survey of Spanish Literature II 3
SPAN 303 Hispanic Culture 3
SPAN 308 Advanced Grammar & Composition 3
SPAN 350 Chicano Literature 3
SPAN 410 Survey of Spanish-American Literature I   
or SPAN 411 Survey of Spanish-American Literature II 3
SPAN 423 Spanish Phonetics 3
SPAN 425 Applied Linguistics for the Spanish Teacher 3
SPAN ___ Upper division (300/400 level) Electives 6
   Total credit hours 30

Notes: SPAN 301 and 410 will be offered in the fall and spring of one year and SPAN 302 and 411 will be offered in the fall and spring of the following year. Depending on level of proficiency, students may be required to enroll in two semesters of 100 level Spanish before enrolling in SPAN 201.

*Heritage speakers should take SPAN 213 and SPAN 214 in year one.

Minors English Minor

ENGL 293 English Literature I 3 ENGL 294 English Literature II 3 ENGL 296 American Literature I 3 ENGL 297 American Literature II 3 ENGL 440 Shakespeare 3 ENGL ___ Upper division English electives 9 Total credit hours 24

Latin American Studies Minor

(18 credit hours minimum)

The Latin American Studies Minor is designed to allow students to focus their studies toward the Latin American arena and prepare for a career in this sphere. The minor is comprised of 18 hours from the below listed courses. These courses deal exclusively with Latin American/Hispanic issues or have a sufficiently large module of study devoted to this region. At least one upper division course is required in Political Science or History, one in Spanish. Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences is also required.

Guided electives (select 4 courses from the following list)

ANTH 201 Cultural Anthropology 3 ART 389 Mexican Art 3 BLED 416 Indo-Chicano Culture and Pedagogy 3 BSAD 486 International Business 3

COMM 400 Cross-Cultural Communication 3
ECON 420 International Economics 3
ECON 425 Money and Banking 3
ENGL 205 Hispanic American Literature 3
GEOG 340 Geography of Latin American 3
HIST/POLS 310 History and Politics of Colonial Mexico 3
HIST/POLS 311 History and Politics of Modern Mexico 3
HIST 347 Latin American History and Politics: Colonial 3
HIST 348 Latin American History and Politics: Modern Period 3
PSY/SOC 401 Comparative Multicultural Social Studies 3
SPAN 303 Hispanic Culture 3
   Total guided electives 12
Senior Seminar (required)   
____496 Senior Seminar in the Social Sciences 3
   (Dept. may be GEOG, HIST, POLS, PSY, or SOC)   
Upper division Spanish (select one course from the following list)   
SPAN 350 Chicano Literature 3
SPAN 380 Spanish Workshop (Offered in Mexico) 3
SPAN 410 Survey of Spanish American Literature I 3
SPAN 411 Survey of Spanish American Literature II 3
   Total upper division Spanish 3
   Total credit hours 18
   Pre-Law Minor   
   (21 credit hours)   

This minor is designed primarily for students who are interested in attending law school, however it provides a useful background for students interested in any career where interaction with the legal system is anticipated. The coursework is designed to acquaint students with legal concepts, but more importantly it is a rigorous course of study that emphasizes writing, critical thinking, and logical reasoning.

Pre-Law Core Requirements (12 credit hours)

CJUS 205 Substantive Criminal Law 3 BSAD 300 Legal Environment for Managers 3 ENGL 419 Advanced Composition 3 POLS 405 American Constitutional Development 3 Total Core credits 12

Guided Elective Courses (9 credit hours)

Students choose three of the following. The three courses must be selected from three different disciplines.

BSAD 355 Communications in Business and Industry 3

CJUS 222 Constitutional Criminal Procedure 3

CJUS 250 Courts and the Criminal Justice System 3

CJUS 331 Corrections Law 3 CJUS 431 Ethics and Liability 3 ENGL 316 Traditional Grammar and Usage 3 ENGL 325 American Life and Thought 3 ENGL 442 The Enlightenment 3 ENGL 465 Critical Approaches to Literature 3 HIST/POLS 406 American Political Thought 3 HIST 456 Social/Intellectual History to 1865 3 HIST 457 Social/Intellectual History Since 1865 3 HIST/POLS 497 History and Politics of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement 3 PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy 3 PHIL 101 Thinking and Problem Solving 3 PHIL 201 Logical Methods 3 PHIL 300 Recent Philosophy 3 POLS 353 International Law and Organization 3 POLS 401 Public Administration 3 Total Guided Elective credit hours 9

Total minimum credit hours 21

Students must choose elective courses that are outside their major. For example, a student with a major in criminal justice may not apply any of the criminal justice courses listed above towards a minor in pre-law. For more information about this minor, please see the pre-law advisor, Curtis Hayes.

SPAN 202 or SPAN 214 SPAN 303 SPAN ___

Spanish Minor

Intermediate Spanish II Spanish for Heritage Speakers II 3 Hispanic Culture 3 Upper division Spanish Electives 12 Total minimum credit hours 18

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Department Chair: Miller Professors: Arasteh, Beattie, Gruszka, Huegel, Medin, Miller Associate Professors: McFarland Assistant Professors: Atkinson, Burgess

Degrees: Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in either Mathematics or Computer Science; Associate of Science in eCommerce and System Administration Majors: Mathematics, Computer Science Minors: Mathematics, Computer Science

Courses in mathematics are intended for those who are studying the subjects for their own sake, for those who are interested in their applications as a tool in various fields, for those who are interested in teaching, and for those who are interested in graduate study. Students in this department are encouraged to study at least one area in which mathematics or computer science is applied. The employment opportunities are excellent for education majors with a mathematics major or minor. Career opportunities for computer science majors or minors are excellent in education, business and many other applied areas.

All classes presented for the major or minor in mathematics or computer science must be passed with a grade of C or better. Courses with credit hours marked with an asterisk (*) may be waived for students with the proper background. MATH 301 Understanding Elementary Mathematics I and MATH 302 Understanding Elementary Mathematics II do not count toward the major or minor in math

ematics.
FOUR YEAR DEGREES
BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)
General Education Requirements 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor). Writing Intensive Credit ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar MATH 171* Calculus I MATH 243* Discrete Mathematics MATH 321 Statistics 41 12 3 5 3 3

Two Physical Science disciplines & labs*

(e.g. Chemistry, Geology, Physics, Physical Science) 8

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements

MATH 172 Calculus II 4 MATH 271 Calculus III 4

Computer Science Core Requirements

CMPS 140* Introduction to Computer Science *3 CMPS 170 Computer Programming Fundamentals 3 CMPS 240 Problem Solving 3 CMPS 263 Databases 3 CMPS 320 Architecture and Assembly Language 3 CMPS 330 Platform Independent Programming 3 CMPS 350 Data Structures 3 CMPS 496 Senior Project and Seminar 3 Total credit hours 21-24

Guided Electives (select 4 of the following)

CMPS 323 Programming Languages 3 CMPS 354 Networking and Communications 3 CMPS 370 Applications Development Techniques 3 CMPS 410 Analysis of Algorithms 3 CMPS 415 Advanced Concepts of Databases 3 CMPS 420 Operating Systems 3 CMPS 430 Computer Graphics 3 CMPS 450 Advanced Object Oriented Programming 3 Minimum elective credit hours 12 Total core credit hours 33-36

* may be waived for students with the proper background

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirement 41 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor) Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 CMPS 170 Computer Programming Fundamentals 3 CHEM 151/153* and 152/154* General Chemistry I & II or PHYS 151/153* and 152/154* General Physics l & ll or PHYS 171/173* and 172/174* Principles of Physics I & II 8

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) Complete an additional six credit hours in Math, and/or Computer Science,

beyond the General Education requirements. This requirement is fulfilled by the major core requirements.

Mathematics Core Requirements

MATH 131 College Algebra *3
MATH 132 Trigonometry *3
MATH 171 Calculus I 5
MATH 172 Calculus II 4
MATH 210 Foundations of Mathematical Thinking 3
MATH 271 Calculus III 4
MATH 321 Statistics 3
MATH 496 Senior Project and Seminar 3
   Total credit hours 22-28

* may be waived for students with the proper background

Concentrations - Students select one of the following three concentration areas:

Statistics/Actuarial Science Concentration

MATH 312 Computational Linear Algebra 3 MATH 323 Differential Equations 3 MATH 421 Advanced Applied Statistics 3 MATH 471 Probability and Statistics I 3 MATH 472 Probability and Statistics II 3 Concentration credit hours 15

Applied Mathematics Concentration

MATH 312 Computational Linear Algebra 3

MATH 323 Differential Equations 3

MATH 421 Advanced Applied Statistics 3

MATH 410 Abstract Mathematics

or MATH 417 Introduction Numerical Analysis 3

MATH 431 Mathematical Modeling 3

Concentration credit hours 15

Mathematics Education (Secondary) Concentration

MATH 304 Mathematics for the Secondary Teacher 3

MATH 327 Survey of Geometry 3

MATH 312 Computational Linear Algebra

or MATH 410 Abstract Mathematics 3

6 credit hours of upper division mathematics courses except Math 301 and 302 6 Concentration credit hours 15

Note: For Teacher licensure requirements students must see the School of Education. A double major program combining a Bachelor degree in Secondary Education with mathematics can be found in the School of Education section of this catalog.

TWO YEAR DEGREE

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN eCOMMERCE AND SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION

(64 credit hours)

Supporting Course Work

ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric I 3 ENGL 102 Composition & Rhetoric II 3 One of the following: COMM 110 or THR 250 3 MATH ___ College Algebra or higher 3 One lab science General Education choice & associated lab 4 Two Social/Behavioral Science General Education Choices 6 One Humanities General Education Choice ART 211, MUSC 111, or THR 110 3 HIST 111, 112, 201, or 202 3 CMPS 111 Computer Literacy 3 Total credit hours 34

e-Commerce & System Adminstration Core Requirements

CMPS 140 CMPS 170 CMPS 240 CMPS 260 CMPS 263 CMPS 265 CMPS 270 CMPS 296

Guided Electives

Introduction to Computer Science 3 Computer Programming Fundamentals 3 Problem Solving 3 Computer Applications 3 Databases 3 eCommerce Application Development 3 System Administration, Software Integration & Planning 3 Associate Degree Project 3 Total core credit hours 24

Any CMPS class not listed in the required core with advisor approval 3 Any 3 credit hour general education with advisor approval 3 6 Total credit hours 64

Minors
Computer Science Minor
(24 credit hours minimum)
Required Computer Science & Math Courses
CMPS 140 Introduction to Computer Science *3
CMPS 170 Computer Programming Fundamentals 3
CMPS 240 Problem Solving 3
CMPS 263 Databases 3
CMPS 320 Architecture and Assembly Language 3
MATH 243 Discrete Mathematics 3
MATH 321 Statistics 3
   Total credit hours 18-21
* may be waived for students with the proper background   
Computer Science Electives (select at least 2 of the following)   
CMPS 323 Programming Languages 3
CMPS 330 Platform Independent Programming 3
CMPS 350 Data Structures 3
CMPS 354 Networking and Communications 3
CMPS 410 Analysis of Algorithms 3
CMPS 415 Advanced Concepts of Databases 3
CMPS 420 Operating Systems 3
CMPS 430 Computer Graphics 3
CMPS 450 Advanced Object Oriented Programming 3
   Minimum elective credit hours 6
   Total minimum credit hours 24-27
Mathematics Minor   
(18-24 credit hours)   
MATH 131 College Algebra *3
MATH 132 Trigonometry *3
MATH 171 Calculus I 5
MATH 172 Calculus II 4
upper-division guided electives   
except MATH 301 and 302 9
Total minimum credit hours 18-24
* may be waived for students with the proper background   

DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES

Department Chair: Dowse Professors: Dowse, Jennings, Miller Associate Professor: Norris Assistant Professors: Camacho, Hill, White Lab Directors: Fisher, Mutchnick

Majors: Biology, Botany, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chemistry, Forest/Wildlife, Forest Wildlife Law Enforcement, General Science, Medical Technology, Science Education, Zoology

Minors: Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Geology, Zoology

The Department of Natural Sciences offers Bachelor of Arts and Science degrees in a variety of subjects as preparation for a large number of professional careers. Pre-professional programs are offered for students interested in careers in dentistry, engineering, forestry, medicine, or pharmacy. Additionally, the Department provides appealing courses which not only fulfill undergraduate science requirements, but also prepare the student for the scientific realities of life.

The faculty is committed to scholarship and research. Research equipment, instru

ments, and library materials are available for student use. General Education Requirements: The following Department of Natural Sciences courses, including their associated laboratories, are approved for fulfilling the General Education requirements for laboratory science. Some of these are restricted (for General Education credit) to students who have declared majors in specific fields. All courses, including designated General Education courses, required for a major or minor in the Department of Natural Sciences must be passed with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 101/103 and 102/104 primarily for non-science majors BIOL 202/203, 204/205 primarily for science majors CHEM 121/123, 151/153, 152/154 GEOL 101/103, 102/104, 201/203 PHSC 101/103, 115/116, 171/173, PHYS 151/153, 152/154, 171/173, 172/174

Advisors: Each student has the option of choosing his or her advisor. Each major for the department however, has a suggested advisor listed at the beginning of the degree plan. These professors are the best qualified to advise a student in each of these areas.

FOUR YEAR DEGREES BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY

Advisors: Miller, Mutchnick, Norris

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirements 41 CHEM 151* and 152* are required (and must be passed with a grade of C or higher) unless Chemistry is declared as a minor or second major. Students must choose a minor outside of the Biology discipline. 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor). Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:

SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) MATH 321 Statistics 3

Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements.

Life Science Core Requirements (*may count as General Ed. Lab Science)

BIOL 202/203* Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205* Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 206/207 Majors III: Intro to Cell Biology 4 BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4 BIOL 366/368 Genetics & lab 4 BIOL 422 Evolution 3 Total core credit hours 23

Biology Major Requirements

BIOL 310/312 Invertebrate Zoology & lab 4 BIOL 311/313 Vertebrate Zoology & lab 4 BIOL 322/324 Dendrology & lab or BIOL 351/353 Plant Taxonomy & lab 4 BIOL 331/333 Biology of Algae and Fungi & lab or BIOL 332/334 Evolution and Diversity of Plants & lab 4 BIOL 360/362 Cell Biology & lab 4 BIOL 442/443 Ornithology & lab or BIOL 448/449 Herpetology & lab or BIOL 451/453 Mammalogy & lab 4 BIOL 471/473 Majors Microbiology & lab 4 BIOL 486 Senior Project 2

Total core credit hours 30 Total credit hours 53

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BOTANY

Advisor: Norris

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirements 41 CHEM 151* and 152* are required (and must be passed with a grade of C or higher) unless Chemistry is declared as a minor or second major. Students must choose a minor or second major outside of the Biology discipline with the exception of Zoology. 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor). Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) MATH 321 Statistics 3

Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements.

Life Science Core Requirements (*may count as General Ed. Lab Science)

BIOL 202/203* Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205* Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4

BIOL 206/207 BIOL 301/303 BIOL 366/368 BIOL 422

Majors III: Intro to Cell Biology 4 Ecology & lab 4 Genetics & lab 4 Evolution 3 Total core credit hours 23

Botany Major Requirements

BIOL 322/324 Dendrology & lab or BIOL 425/427 Range Vegetation & lab 4

BIOL 331/333 BIOL 332/334 BIOL 351/353 BIOL 410/412 BIOL 471/473 BIOL 486 BIOL ___ Biology of Algae and Fungi & lab 4 Evolution and Diversity of Plants & lab 4 Plant Taxonomy & lab 4 Plant Physiology & lab 4 Majors Microbiology & lab 4 Senior Project 2 Upper-Division guided electives 4 Total major hours 30 Total credit hours 53

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Advisor: Camacho

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirements CHEM 151* and 152* are required (and must be passed with a grade of C or higher) unless Chemistry is declared as a minor or second major. Students must choose a minor outside of the Biology discipline. 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major &

minor). Writing Intensive Credit ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 12 3
B.A. Requirements   
Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252   
B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)   
MATH 321 Statistics 3

Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements.

Life Science Core Requirements (*may count as General Ed. Lab Science)

BIOL 202/203* Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205* Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4

BIOL 206/207 Majors III: Intro to Cell Biology & lab 4
BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4
BIOL 366/368 Genetics & lab 4
BIOL 422 Evolution 3
   Total core credit hours 23

Cell and Molecular Biology Major Requirements

BIOL 360/362 Cell Biology & lab 4
BIOL 460 Cell Physiology 3
BIOL 465/467 Molecular Genetics & lab 4
BIOL 471/473 Majors Microbiology & lab 4
BIOL 474 Virology 3
BIOL 476/478 Immunology & lab 4
BIOL 486 Senior Project 2
BIOL ___ Upper-Division guided electives 6
   Total core credit hours 30
   Total credit hours 53

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY

Advisor: White

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41 Students must choose a minor or second major outside of the Chemistry discipline. 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major

& minor).
Writing Intensive Credit 12
ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3
CMPS 111* Computer Literacy - PC 3
MATH 131* College Algebra 3
MATH 132 Trigonometry 3
MATH 171 Calculus I 5
MATH 172 Calculus II 4

PHYS 151/153* General Physics I & PHYS 152/154* General Physics II or PHYS 171/173* Princ of Physics I & PHYS 172/174* Princ of Physics II 8

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252 Students planning to enter graduate school should take additional Math.

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

CMPS 260 Computer Applications 3 MATH 321 Statistics 3

Chemistry Core Requirements (*may count as General Ed. Lab Science)

CHEM 151/153*General Chemistry I & lab 4 CHEM 152/154*General Chemistry II & lab 4 CHEM 201/202 Analytical Chemistry & lab 4 CHEM 301 Instrumental Analysis 4 CHEM 351/353 Organic Chemistry I & lab 5 CHEM 352/354 Organic Chemistry II & lab 5 CHEM 360 Introduction to Biochemistry 3 CHEM 401/403 Physical Chemistry I & lab 4 CHEM 402/404 Physical Chemistry II & lab 4 CHEM 490 Chemistry Research Project 3 Total core credit hours 40

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FOREST WILDLIFE

Advisor: Jennings

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41 CHEM 151* and 152* are required (and must be passed with a grade of C or higher) unless Chemistry is declared as a minor or second major. Students must choose a minor or second major outside of the Biology discipline. 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor). Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:

SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

MATH 321 Statistics 3 Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements.

Life Science Core Requirements (*may count as General Ed. Lab Science)

BIOL 202/203* Majors: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205* Majors: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 206/207 Majors: Intro to Cell Biology & lab 4 BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4 BIOL 366/368 Genetics & lab 4 Total core credit hours 20

Forest Wildlife Major Requirements

BIOL 310/312 Invertebrate Zoology & lab 4 BIOL 311/313 Vertebrate Zoology & lab 4 BIOL 322/324 Dendrology & lab 4 BIOL 351/353 Plant Taxonomy & lab 4 BIOL 375/377 Principles of Wildlife Biology & lab 4 BIOL 425/427 Range Vegetation & lab 4

Select two of the following three choices

BIOL 442/443 Ornithology & lab 4 or BIOL 448/449 Herpetology & lab 4 or BIOL 451/453 Mammalogy & lab 4 BIOL 481 Practicum 3 Total core credit hours 35 Total credit hours 55

BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE FOREST WILDLIFE LAW ENFORCEMENT

(no minor required)

Advisor: Jennings

This major is intended specifically for students wishing to pursue a career as a Game Warden or Wildlife Enforcement Officer at the state level (similar federal positions possess a different set of requirements). Students desiring employment in other forestry/wildlife positions within relevant state and federal agencies should choose the standard Forestry/Wildlife degree with an appropriate minor.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirements 41 CHEM 151/153* and PHSC 131/133* are required (and must be passed with a grade of C or higher). If Chemistry is declared as a second major, a course other than CHEM 151/153 must be used to fulfill General Ed. Lab Science requirement. 41 credits of upper division courses are required. As this is a B.A.S. degree, upper division hours outside the major are not required. Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) MATH 321 Statistics 3 Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements. 3

6

Life Science Core Requirements (*may count as General Ed. Lab Science)

BIOL 202/203* Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205* Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 206/207 Majors III: Intro to Cell Biology & lab 4 BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4 BIOL 366/368 Genetics & lab 4 Total core credit hours 20

Forest Wildlife Law Enforcement Major Requirements

BIOL 310/312 Invertebrate Zoology & lab 4 BIOL 311/313 Vertebrate Zoology & lab 4 BIOL 322/324 Dendrology & lab 4 BIOL 351/353 Plant Taxonomy & lab 4 BIOL 375/377 Principles of Wildlife Biology & lab 4 BIOL 425/427 Range Vegetation & lab 4

Select two of the following three choices

BIOL 442/443 Ornithology & lab 4 or BIOL 448/449 Herpetology & lab 4 or BIOL 451/453 Mammalogy & lab 4 BIOL 481 Practicum 3 Total core credit hours 35 Total credit hours 55

Law Enforcement Academy Requirements (should be taken during the Spring and Summer of students’ senior year)

CJUS 101 Law Enforcement Training Academy I 14
CJUS 102 Law Enforcement Training Academy II 10
   Total Law Enforcement 24

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GENERAL SCIENCE Advisor: Dowse

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirements 41 Two of the Lab Science courses listed in the core requirements will count for General Education credits and must be passed with a grade of C or higher. Students must choose a minor from a separate discipline. 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor). Writing Intensive Credit 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) MATH 321 Statistics 3

Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements.

General Science Core Requirements (8 credits will count for Gen’l Ed Lab Science)

BIOL 202/203 Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 CHEM 151/153 General Chemistry I & lab 4 CHEM 152/154 General Chemistry II & lab 4 Total core & gen’l ed lab science credit hours 16

Guided Electives (select 15 credit hours minimum from the following courses

plus another 24 credits in upper division courses as specified): CMPS 140 Intro to Computer Science 3 GEOL 101/103 General Geology I & lab 4 GEOL 102/104 General Geology II & lab 4 GEOL 311/313 Natural Resources & lab 4 GEOL 315 Geology of New Mexico 3 PHYS 151/153 General Physics I & lab 4 PHYS 152/154 General Physics II & lab 4 PHYS 171/173 Principles of Physics I & lab 4 PHYS 172/174 Principles of Physics II & lab 4 PHSC 115/116 Descriptive Astronomy & lab 4

Total credits from listed courses 15

Other upper division electives

Upper-division science electives in Biological Science

12 Upper-division science electives in Physical Science, (Chemistry, Physics, Geology) 12

Total upper division electives 24 Total core and elective credits for major 47 (outside of General Education and BA/BS hours)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

(in conjunction with UNM) (no minor required)

Advisor: Miller

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirements 41 Two of the Lab Science courses listed in the core requirements will count for General Education credits (and must be passed with a grade of C or higher). 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor). Writing Intensive Courses 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 CMPS 140 Introduction to Computer Science 3 COMM 110* Public Speaking 3 MATH 131* College Algebra 3 MVSC 213 First Aid 2

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

MATH 321 Statistics 3 CMPS 260 Computer Applications 3

Medical Technology Core Requirements

(*8 credits will count for Gen. Ed Lab Science)

Biology courses:

BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 254/256 Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 4 BIOL 255/257 Anatomy & Physiology II & lab 4 BIOL 310/312 Invertebrate Zoology & lab 4 BIOL 360/362 Cell Biology & lab 4 BIOL 371/373 Microbiology & lab 4 BIOL 486 Senior Project (Immunology) 2 Total Biology credit hours 26

Chemistry courses:

CHEM 151/153 General Chemistry I & lab 4 CHEM 152/154 General Chemistry II & lab 4 CHEM 201/202 Analytical Chemistry & lab 4 CHEM 301 Instrumental Analysis 4 CHEM 351/353 Organic Chemistry I & lab 5

Total Chemistry credit hours 21 Total core credits for major 39 (outside of General Education and BS hours)

Clinical Study:

The student must submit a formal application for admission to UNM school of Medical Technology, be admitted, and complete clinical study. Upon the student’s completion of the year of study in the school of medical technology, the director of the school will certify the student’s credits to the WNMU Registrar, thus enabling the student to enter candidacy for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. At the same time the student is eligible to sit for National Certifying exams given by the Board of Registry (ASCP) or the National Certifying Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NCA).

Science Education Major

For licensure to teach secondary science students must complete both a Science Education major and a Secondary Education major. This double major program is completed in conjunction with the School of Education at WNMU and fulfills all requirements for licensure to teach secondary science.

Students may also choose to major in Secondary Education with an endorsement in Earth and Space Science or Elementary Education with an endorsement in General Science.

Students may also choose the route of obtaining an MAT if they have an undergraduate degree in science.

Degree plans for the double majors in Secondary Education and Science Education and endorsement degree plans can be found in the School of Education section of this catalog.

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SCIENCE EDUCATION - Biology Concentration

Advisor: Miller

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41

Students must choose a minor from a separate discipline.

54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major &

minor).

Writing Intensive Credits 12

ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

CMPS 110* Computer Literacy - MacIntosh 3

CHEM 151/153*General Chemistry I & lab (passed with a C or higher) 4

GEOL 101/103* General Geology I & lab 4

PHSC 101/103* Physical Science for General Education I & lab 4

PHSC 102/104* Physical Science for General Education II & lab 4

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:

SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) MATH 321 Statistics 3

Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements.

Science Education - Biology Core Requirements BIOL 202/203 Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 254/256 Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 4 BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4 BIOL 310/312 Invertebrate Zoology & lab or BIOL 311/313 Vertebrate Zoology & lab 4 BIOL 366/368 Genetics & lab 4 BIOL 442/443 Ornithology & lab or BIOL 448/449 Herpetology & lab or BIOL 451/453 Mammalogy & lab 4 BIOL 450 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 3 Total Biology core credit hours 31

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SCIENCE EDUCATION - Physical Science Concentration

Advisor: Dowse

Note: This degree plan does not include the teacher licensure. See paragraph at the beginning of the Science Education section in this chapter.

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education)

General Education Requirements 41 Students must choose a minor from a separate discipline. 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor). Writing Intensive Credits 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3 CMPS 110* Computer Literacy - MacIntosh 3 BIOL 202/203* Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205* Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 254/256 Anatomy & Physiology I & lab 4 BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following:

SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours)

MATH 321 Statistics 3 Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements.

Science Education - Physical Science Core Requirements

CHEM 151/153 General Chemistry I & lab 4 CHEM 152/154 General Chemistry II & lab 4 GEOL 101/103 General Geology I & lab 4 GEOL 315 Geology of New Mexico 3 PHYS 151/153 General Physics I & lab 4 PHYS 152/154 General Physics II & lab 4 PHSC 115/116 Descriptive Astronomy & lab 4 BIOL 450 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 3 Total credit hours 30

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ZOOLOGY

Advisor: Jennings

Supporting Course Work (*may count as General Education) General Education Requirements 41 CHEM 151* and 152* are required (and must be passed with a grade of C or higher) unless Chemistry is declared as a minor or second major. Students must choose a minor or second major outside of the Biology discipline with the exception of Botany. 54 credits of upper division courses are required (6 credits outside of major & minor). Writing Intensive Credits 12 ACAD 101 Student Success Seminar 3

B.A. Requirements

Complete any upper division Spanish course, or one of the following: SPAN 202, SPAN 214, or SPAN 252

B.S. Requirements (6 credit hours) MATH 321 Statistics 3

Complete an additional three credit hours in Computer Science, beyond the General Education requirements.

Life Science Core Requirements (*may count as General Ed. Lab Science) BIOL 202/203* Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 204/205* Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 BIOL 206/207 Majors III: Intro to Cell Biology & lab 4 BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4 BIOL 366/368 Genetics & lab 4 BIOL 422 Evolution 3

Total core credit hours 23

Zoology Major Requirements

BIOL 310/312 Invertebrate Zoology & lab 4
BIOL 311/313 Vertebrate Zoology & lab 4
BIOL 342 Comparative Physiology   
or BIOL 320 Animal Behavioral Ecology   
or BIOL 432 Biogeography 3
department of natural sciences / 247
BIOL 442/443 Ornithology & lab   
or BIOL 448/449 Herpetology & lab   
or BIOL 451/453 Mammalogy & lab 4
BIOL 462/464 Comparative Chordate Anatomy & lab 5
BIOL 486 Senior Project 2
BIOL ___ Upper-Division guided electives 8
   30
Total credit hours 53
Minors   
Biology Minor   
Biology core requirements   
BIOL 202/203 Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4
BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4
BIOL 206/207 Majors III: Intro to Cell Biology & lab 4
BIOL 310/312 Invertebrate Zoology & lab   
or BIOL 311/313 Vertebrate Zoology & lab 4
BIOL 331/333 Biology of Algae and Fungi & lab   
or BIOL 332/334 Evolution and Diversity of Plants & lab 4
Total core credit hours 20
Guided electives: (select 4 credit hours minimum)   
BIOL 301/303 Ecology & lab 4
BIOL 342 Comparative Physiology 3
BIOL 351/353 Plant Taxonomy & lab 4
BIOL 360/362 Cell Biology & lab 4
BIOL 366/368 Genetics & lab 4
BIOL 422 Evolution 3
BIOL 432 Biogeography 3
BIOL 462/464 Comparative Chordate Anatomy & lab 5
   Total guided electives 4
   Total credit hours 24
   Botany Minor   
BIOL 202/203 Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4
BIOL 204/205 Majors II: Animals Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4
BIOL 206/207 Majors III: Intro to Cell Biology & lab 4
BIOL 331/333 Biology of Algae and Fungi & lab   

or BIOL 332/334 Evolution and Diversity of Plants & lab 4 BIOL 322/324 Dendrology & lab or BIOL 425/427 Range Vegetation & lab 4

Total credit hours 20

Note: Zoology and General Science majors should substitute any three of the following courses (not already taken for core requirements) for BIOL 202/203, BIOL 204/205, and BIOL 206/207.

BIOL 322/324 BIOL 331/333 BIOL 332/334 BIOL 410/412 BIOL 425/427 BIOL 471/473 Dendrology & lab 4 Biology and Algae and Fungi & lab 4 Evolution & Diversity of Plants & lab 4 Plant Physiology & lab 4 Range Vegetation & lab 4 Majors Microbiology & lab 4

Chemistry Minor

Chemistry core requirements

CHEM 151/153 General Chemistry I & lab 4 CHEM 152/154 General Chemistry II & lab 4 Total core credit hours 8

Guided electives - (select 16 credit hours minimum):

CHEM 201/202 Analytical Chemistry & lab 4 CHEM 301 Instrumental Analysis 4 CHEM 351/353 Organic Chemistry I & lab 5 CHEM 352/354 Organic Chemistry II & lab 5 CHEM 360 Introduction to Biochemistry 3 CHEM 401/403 Physical Chemistry I & lab 4 CHEM 402/404 Physical Chemistry II & lab 4 Total guided electives 16 Total credit hours 24

Geology Minor

GEOL 101/103 General Geology I & lab 4 GEOL 102/104 General Geology II & lab 4 GEOL 301/303 Rocks and Minerals & lab 4 GEOL 331/333 Sedimentology & lab 4 GEOL 340/342 Field and Research Methods & lab 4 GEOL 401/403 Hydrogeology & lab 4

BIOL 202/203 BIOL 204/205 BIOL 206/207 BIOL 310/312 BIOL 311/313 BIOL 462/464 Total credit hours 24

Zoology Minor

Majors I: Plant Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 Majors II: Animal Form, Function and Diversity & lab 4 Majors III: Intro to Cell Biology 4 Invertebrate Zoology & lab 4 Vertebrate Zoology & lab 4 Comparative Chordate Anatomy & lab 5 Total credit hours 25 Note: Botany, Cell/Molecular Biology, and General Science majors should substitute any three of the following courses for BIOL 202/203, 204/205, and 206/207: BIOL 320 Animal Behavioral Ecology 3 BIOL 432 Biogeography 3 BIOL 442/443 Ornithology & lab 4 BIOL 448/449 Herpetology & lab 4 BIOL 451/453 Mammalogy & lab 4 BIOL 472 Readings in Science 3

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

Advisor: Miller

Pre-Dentistry

Mo