Vascular Plants of the Gila Wilderness

Presented in Association with the
Western New Mexico University Department of Natural Sciences

Pinus scopulorum (Engelmann) Lemmon
(Ponderosa Pine)

Family: Pinaceae

Status: Native

Synonyms:
Pinus ponderosa Lawson var. scopulorum Engelmann
Pinus brachyptera Engelmann

Pinus scopulorum is the most common upper elevation pine in the Gila National Forest. It is the tallest of the pines here, up to over 100 feet tall. It has mostly three needles per fascicle, and the needles are about 15 cm long on average. The bark is red brown and deeply furrowed, as well as sometimes appearing to be assembled like pieces of a puzzle. The cones are smaller and rounder than those of Pinus strobiformis. The seeds are winged.
Please click on an image for a larger file.



Pinus scopulorum, photo Russ Kleinman, Burro Mtns., Deadman Canyon, May 10, 2007



Pinus scopulorum, male and female cones, photo Russ Kleinman, Burro Mtns., Deadman Canyon, July 14, 2007



Pinus scopulorum, detail of bark, photo Russ Kleinman, Pinos Altos Range, Signal Peak turnoff, Aug. 12, 2008



Pinus scopulorum, growth form, photo Russ Kleinman, Black Range, Emory Pass, Dec. 10, 2008



Pinus scopulorum, winged seed, photo Russ Kleinman & Richard Felger, Pinos Altos Range, Myer Canyon, November 6, 2010



Pinus scopulorum, fascicle, photo Russ Kleinman, Pinos Altos Range, Pinos Altos, December 7, 2009



Pinus scopulorum, 5x macro of cross section of needle, photo Russ Kleinman, Pinos Altos Range, Pinos Altos, December 7, 2009


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