National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)

Report for Academic Year 2001-2002

Table 1. Respondent Characteristics

 

 

 

WNMU

Other Master’s granting institutions

Overall

NSSE 2002

Overall Response Rate

41%

39%

41%

       

Number of Respondents

168

32,498

80,497

NSSE Sample Size

432

85,068

206,844

Total Population

464

340,738

917,756

Sampling Error

     

Overall

6.0%

0.5%

0.3%

First-year

8.9%

0.8%

0.5%

Senior

8.6%

0.7%

0.5%

Mode of Completion

     

Paper

88%

68%

55%

Web

12%

32%

45%

Gender

     

Male

32%

31%

34%

Female

68%

69%

66%

Race/Ethnicity

     

African American

2%

7%

6%

American Indian/Native American

3%

1%

1%

Asian American/Pacific Islander

0%

6%

6%

Caucasian/White

52%

71%

75%

Hispanic

40%

10%

7%

Other

0%

1%

1%

Multiple

0%

0%

0%

International

0%

1%

1%

Class Level

     

First-year (FY)

47%

47%

49%

Senior

53%

53%

51%

Enrollment Status

     

Full-time

65%

84%

88%

Part-time

35%

16%

12%

Place of Residence

     

On-campus

9%

33%

44%

Off-campus

91%

67%

56%

Table 2 – NSSE 2002

Means Summary Report

(Shaded and Bolded Items Significant at p < .001, Shaded and Underlined Items Significant at p < .01 level,

Shaded Items with no Bolding or Underlining Significant at p < .05 level)

(F = Freshman; S = Senior)

Academic and Intellectual Experiences

1=never, 2=sometimes, 3=often, 4=very often

Item

WNMU – F

WNMU – S

Masters – F

Masters – S

NSSE – F

NSSE - S

1a. Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions

3.14

3.19

2.81

3.11

2.80

3.10

1d. Worked on a paper or project that required integrating ideas or information from various sources.

2.75

3.28

3.06

3.34

3.04

3.33

1e. Included diverse perspectives (different races, religions, genders, political beliefs, etc.) in class discussions or writing assignments.

2.37

2.74

2.70

2.74

2.71

2.73

1f. Came to class without completing readings or assignments.

1.69

2.03

2.02

2.05

2.07

2.11

1g. Worked with other students on projects during class.

2.72

2.57

2.40

2.54

2.34

2.45

1h. Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments.

2.14

2.36

2.32

2.70

2.40

2.72

1i. Put together ideas or concepts from different courses when completing assignments or during class discussions

2.22

2.56

2.44

2.80

2.47

2.82

1l. Used an electronic medium (list-serv, chat group, Internet, etc.) to discuss or complete an assignment.

2.10

2.59

2.58

2.77

2.61

2.76

1m. Used email to communicate with an instructor.

1.96

2.42

2.75

2.95

2.88

3.07

1s. Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student life activities, etc.)

1.32

1.72

1.51

1.75

1.53

1.81

1u. Had serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your own

2.25

2.73

2.54

2.56

2.59

2.58

1v. Had serious conversations with students who differ from you in terms of their religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values.

2.17

2.59

2.62

2.59

2.70

2.64

Notes – Item One

    1. Whether freshman or senior, WNMU students are more likely to ask questions in class than their peers.
    2. WNMU Freshmen are less likely than their national peers to integrate ideas and information and include diverse perspectives in class assignments.
    1. While WNMU Freshman may come to class less prepared than their peers, aty the senior level, preparation levels match their peers.
    2. WNMU Freshmen are more likely to have worked with other students on projects in class and less likely to work with other students outside of class than their peers.
    1. WNMU Freshmen are less likely to use electronic technology for class assignments or communication than their peers; seniors only have means below their peers when it comes to using email to communicate with an instructor.
    2. WNMU senior students’ tend to work with faculty members on activities other than coursework more often than freshmen do.
    1. While WNMU freshmen are less likely than their peers elsewhere to have serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity or with students who hold different political or religious views or personal values, WNMU seniors are more like students at peer institutions.
    2. Similarities between freshmen and seniors with regard to their peers is reflected in these areas: class presentations, preparation of two or more drafts of a paper before turning it in, tutoring other students, participating in a community-based project as part of a regular course, discussing grades or assignments with an instructor, talking about career plans with a faculty member or advisor, discussing ideas from reading or classes with a faculty member outside of class, receiving prompt feedback from faculty on academic performance, working harder than they thought they could be meet an instructor’s standards/expectations, discussing ideas from readings or classes with others outside of class.

 

 

Mental Activities

1=very little, 2=some, 3=quite a bit, 4=very much

2a. Memorizing facts, ideas, or methods from your courses and readings so you can repeat them in pretty much the same form.

2.61

2.97

2.97

2.79

2.94

2.74

2b. Analyzing the basic elements of an idea, experience, or theory such as examining a particular case or situation in depth and considering its components.

2.75

2.95

3.11

3.26

3.14

3.27

2c. Synthesizing and organizing ideas, information, or experiences into new, more complex interpretations and relationships.

2.41

2.81

2.83

3.04

2.85

3.05

2d. Making judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods such as examining how others gathered and interpreted data and assessing the soundness of their conclusions.

2.45

2.87

2.81

2.93

2.80

2.93

2e. Applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations.

2.64

2.95

2.94

3.17

2.99

3.17

Notes – Item Two

    1. WNMU freshmen did less memorization than their peers at other institutions.
    2. Freshman and senior students had mean scores below their peers in all areas of this category. With the exception of seniors at Master’s level peer schools in item 2a and peers in both categories in item 2d, all items were significant at the p< .05, .01, or .001 levels.
    1. Both WNMU freshmen and seniors were less likely than their peers at other institutions to apply theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations, to analyze basic elements of an idea, experience, or theory, or to synthesize and organize ideas.
    2. WNMU seniors perceive greater exposure to more analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and application of material than that perceived by freshmen students at WNMU.

Reading and Writing

1=none, 2=between 1 and 4, 3= between 5 and 10, 4=between 11 and 20, 5=more than 20

3a. Number of assigned textbooks, books, or book-length packs of course readings.

2.71

2.95

3.38

3.24

3.48

3.32

3b. Number of books read on your own (not assigned) for personal enjoyment or academic enrichment.

2.44

2.09

2.02

2.19

2.03

2.21

3c. Number of written papers or reports of 20 pages or more.

1.63

1.57

1.23

1.64

1.21

1.65

3d. Number of written papers or reports between 5 and 19 pages.

2.12

2.51

2.42

2.65

2.47

2.69

3e. Number of written papers or reports of fewer than 5 pages

2.43

2.86

3.28

3.09

3.32

3.12

Notes – Item Three

    1. WNMU freshmen mean scores were significantly different in all areas of this item. WNMU seniors were very similar to their peers in all areas except the number of assigned textbooks, books, or book-length packs of course readings (which were below peers) and compared with their NSSE peers, in the number of written papers or reports of fewer than 5 pages.
    2. WNMU students tend to write longer papers compared to their peers. While WNMU Freshmen means were significantly above their peers in the number of written papers or reports of 20 pages or more, they were significantly below their peers in reports of 5-19 pages or those of fewer than 5 pages.
    1. WNMU freshmen and seniors both had significantly fewer assigned textbook, books, or book-length packs of course readings for their classes than did their peers.

 

Challenge of Examinations

Notes – Item Four

    1. WNMU Freshmen and Seniors were similar to their peers in the extent that exams challenged them to do their best work. On a scale from 1=very little to 7=very much, WNMU scores exceeded 5.5 for both groups.

 

Quality of Advising

Notes – Item Five

    1. On a scale of 1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, and 4=excellent, WNMU freshmen rank the quality of advising 2.77, while for WNMU seniors the value is 2.95. This was not significantly different from their peers.
    2. WNMU seniors’ ranking of 2.95 for the quality of advising reflected a higher mean score than that for WNMU freshmen (2.77). This was the opposite of the trend at their peer institutions where the mean score for quality of advising was lower among seniors than the figure was among freshmen..

 

Enriching Educational Experiences

Which of the following have you done or do you plan to do before you graduate from your institution? 0=No, 1=Yes (undecided=missing) Means are proportion of students responding "Yes."

6a. Practicum, internship, field experience, co-op experience, or clinical assignment.

.71

.78

.93

.76

.94

.76

6b. Community service or volunteer work

.57

.91

.87

.66

.89

.69

6d. Work on a research project with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements

.30

.26

.45

.24

.51

.28

6e. Foreign language coursework

.34

.33

.59

.39

.62

.44

6f. Study abroad

.27

.10

.49

.15

.56

.20

6g. Independent study or self-designed major.

.43

.44

.27

.29

.28

.31

6h. Culminating senior experience (comprehensive exam, capstone course, thesis, project, etc.)

.50

.43

.73

.60

.77

.63

Notes – Item Six

    1. While initially WNMU Freshmen mean scores were significantly different from their peers regarding intent to do a practicum, internship, field experience, or other intern experience, at the senior level WNMU students matched their peers.
    2. WNMU freshmen expectations of undertaking community service or volunteer work were well below national means at the freshmen level; however it was well above national means at the senior level.
    1. WNMU students were more likely to have undertaken independent study or a self-designed major than their peers at other institutions..
    2. WNMU seniors were less likely to have a culminating senior experience than their national peers. Similarly, WNMU freshmen were less likely to expect such an experience than were their peers.

 

 

Time Usage

1=0 hrs/wk, 2=1-5 hrs/wk, 3=6-10 hrs/wk, 4=11-15 hrs/wk, 5=16-20 hrs/wk, 6= 21-25 hrs/wk, 7=26-30 hrs/wk, 8=more than 30hrs/wk

7a. Preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, rehearsing, and other activities related to your academic program.

3.28

3.85

3.91

4.00

4.16

4.16

7c. Working for pay off campus.

3.84

3.80

2.85

4.21

2.32

3.65

7d. Participating in co-curricular activities (organizations, campus publications, student government, etc.

1.33

1.46

1.96

1.86

2.10

2.04

7e. Relaxing and socializing (watching TV, partying, exercising, etc.)

3.19

3.25

4.00

3.61

4.11

3.75

7f. Providing care for dependents living with you (parents, children, spouse, etc.

4.21

3.62

1.83

2.59

1.56

2.23

7g. Commuting to class

2.41

2.29

1.91

2.19

1.80

2.06

Notes – Item Seven

    1. The preparation time that WNMU freshmen put into their classes is significantly below that of their national peers. However, there was no significant difference among WNMU seniors and their national peers.
    2. While WNMU students working for pay on campus paralleled the national means, there was a significant difference between WNMU freshmen working off campus and their national peers.
    1. Both WNMU freshmen and seniors are much less likely to be involved in co-curricular activities and relaxing and socializing than is true for their national peers.
    2. WNMU students spend significantly more time providing care for dependents living with them than do their national peers.
    1. While WNMU freshmen are more likely to spend time commuting to class than their national peers, there is no significant difference between WNMU seniors and their peers nationally.

 

 

Educational and Personal Growth

1=very little, 2=some, 3=quite a bit, 4=very much

8a. Acquiring a broad general education

2.80

3.14

3.08

3.24

3.11

3.26

8b. Acquiring job or work-related knowledge and skills.

2.73

2.85

2.51

3.04

2.53

3.00

8c. Writing clearly and effectively

2.75

2.84

2.91

3.06

2.87

3.06

8d. Speaking clearly and effectively

2.77

2.79

2.67

2.97

2.61

2.96

8e. Thinking critically and analytically

2.84

2.99

3.07

3.29

3.12

3.33

8f. Analyzing quantitative problems

2.72

2.64

2.58

2.89

2.62

2.90

8h. Working effectively with others

2.77

2.92

2.83

3.13

2.81

3.13

8n. Developing a personal code of values and ethics.

2.32

2.55

2.61

2.71

2.63

2.73

Notes – Item Eight

    1. WNMU seniors, when compared to their national peers, showed significant differences in their experiences at WNMU leading to their knowledge, skill, or development in writing clearly and effectively, speaking clearly and effectively, thinking critically and analytically, analyzing quantitative problems, and in working effectively with others. WNMU seniors were similar to their national peers in their experiences at WNMU leading to their knowledge, skill, or development in these areas: acquiring a broad general education, acquiring job or work-related knowledge and skills, using computing and information technology, voting in local, state, or national elections, learning effectively on your own, understanding yourself, understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds, sloving complex real-world problems, developing a personal code of values and ethics, and contributing to the welfare of your community.
    2. WNMU freshmen, when compared to their national peers, showed significant differences in their experiences at WNMU leading to their knowledge, skill, or development in acquiring job or work-related knowledge and skills, acquiring a broad general education, thinking critically and analytically, and developing a personal code of values and ethics. WNMU freshmen were similar to their national peers in their experiences at WNMU leading to their knowledge, skill, or development in these areas: writing clearly and effectively, speaking clearly and effectively, using computing and information technology, working effectively with others, voting in local, state, or national elections, learning effectively on your own, understanding yourself, understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds, solving complex real-world problems, and contributing to the welfare of your community.

 

 

Institutional Environment

1=very little, 2=some, 3=quite a bit, 4=very much

9a. Spending significant amounts of time studying and on academic work

2.77

2.81

3.09

3.09

3.13

3.11

9b. Providing the support you need to help you succeed academically

2.53

2.51

2.98

2.87

3.01

2.87

9c. Encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds.

2.18

2.19

2.53

2.40

2.55

2.38

9e. Providing the support you need to thrive socially

1.89

1.70

2.29

2.08

2.31

2.10

9f. Attending campus events and activities (special speakers, cultural performance, athletic events, etc.)

1.75

1.85

2.66

2.40

2.77

2.51

Notes – Item Nine

    1. Every item in this category was significantly different from the peer means at the p< .05, .01, or .001 levels with the exception of means for WNMU seniors on the item encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds.
    2. WNMU means were below the national means in providing the support students need to help them succeed academically, providing the support students need to thrive socially, and attending campus events and activities.
    1. WNMU students spend significantly less time studying and on academic work than their national peers.

 

Quality of Relationships

1=unfriendly, unsupportive, sense of alienation to 7=friendly, supportive, sense of belonging

10c. Relationships with administrative personnel and offices

4.64

3.72

4.86

4.60

4.88

4.57

 

 

Notes – Item Ten

    1. In terms of the quality of relationships at the institution, WNMU freshmen means of relationships with other students is 5.81 and with faculty members 5.69, both of which are higher, but not significantly higher, than the national means.
    2. While freshman means of the relationships with administrative personnel and offices are a full point or more below the means for the relationships with other students and faculty, they are not significantly different from the national means. However, WNMU senior relationships with administrative personnel and offices are significantly different from the national means and are over 1.5 points lower than relationships with faculty and more than 2 points different from relationships with other students.

 

Satisfaction

1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, 4=excellent

11. How would you evaluate your entire educational experience at this institution?

3.01

2.84

3.15

3.22

3.19

3.24

 

1=definitely no, 2=probably no, 3=probably yes, 4=definitely yes

12. If you could start over again, would you go to the same institution you are now attending?

3.20

2.84

3.13

3.13

3.17

3.13

Notes – Item Eleven and Twelve

    1. For both national samples, WNMU seniors are significantly below national means in terms of their evaluation of their educational experience at WNMU.
    2. WNMU seniors have a significantly lower mean value than their peers for the item "If you could start over again, would you go to the same institution you are now attending?" However, freshman at WNMU are very similar to the national means for their counterparts.