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Program Information

Name of Institution:

Western New Mexico University

Institution/Program Type:

Traditional

Academic Year:

2008-09

State:

New Mexico

 

Address:

1000 W. College Avenue

 

Silver City, NM, 88062

 

Contact Name:

Dr. Patricia Manzanares-Gonzales

Phone:

575-538-6427

Email:

manzanaresgonzalesp@wnmu.edu

Is your institution a member of a Teacher Quality Enhancement (TQE) partnership grant: No

Section I.a Program Admission

For each element listed below, check if it is required for admission into any of your initial teacher certification program(s) at either the undergraduate or postgraduate level.

Element

Undergraduate

Postgraduate

Application

Yes 

Yes 

Fee/Payment

No 

No 

Transcript

Yes 

Yes 

Fingerprint check

Yes 

Yes 

Background check

Yes 

Yes 

Experience in a classroom or working with children

No 

No 

Minimum number of courses/credites/semester hours completed

Yes 

Yes 

Minimum high school GPA

No 

No 

Minimum undergraduate GPA

Yes 

Yes 

Minimum GPA in content area coursework

Yes 

Yes 

Minimum GPA in professional education coursework

Yes 

Yes 

Minimum ACT score

No 

No 

Minimum SAT score

No 

No 

Minimum GRE score

No 

Yes 

Minimum basic skills test score

Yes 

Yes 

Subject area/academic content test or other subject matter verification

No 

No 

Minimum Miller Analogies test score

No 

No 

Recommendation(s)

Yes 

Yes 

Essay or personal statement

Yes 

Yes 

Interview

Yes 

Yes 

Resume

Yes 

Yes 

Bechelor's degree or higher

No 

Yes 

Job offer from school/district

No 

No 

Personality test (e.g.,Myers-Briggs Assessment)

No 

No 

Other (specify: 1. Completion of EDUC 311 Found. of Educ. w/ a C or better, Complete degree plan, Complete PB&D Surv )

Yes 

Yes 

Section I.b Program Enrollment

Provide the number of students in the teacher preparation program in the following categories. Note that you must report on the number of students by ethnicity and race separately. Individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino will be reported in one of the race categories. Also note that individuals can belong to one or more racial groups, so the sum of the members of each racial category may not necessarily add up to the total number of students enrolled.

Total number of students enrolled in 2008-09:

75 

Unduplicated number of males enrolled in 2008-09:

19 

Unduplicated number of females enrolled in 2008-09:

56 

 

2008-09

Number enrolled

Ethnicity

Hispanic/Latino of any race:

25 

Race

American Indian or Alaska Native:

Asian:

Black or African American:

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander:

White:

49 

Two or more races:

Section I.c Supervised Experience

Provide the following information about supervised clinical experience in 2008-09.

Average number of clock hours required prior to student teaching

 135 

Average number of clock hours required for student teaching

 680 

Number of full-time equivalent faculty in supervised clinical experience during this academic year

 13 

Number of full-time equivalent adjunct faculty in supervised clinical experience during this academic year (IHE and = PreK-12 staff)

 98 

Number of students in supervised clinical experience during this academic year

 98 

Please provide any additional information about or descriptions of the supervised clinical experiences:

Our students start their supervised clinical experiences with the following:

1. Field One and Two Experiences - Between 117 and 153 hours, dependent upon the program. The number entered above is an average.

2. Field Three Experiences - A minimum of 680 hours.

Section I.d Certified Licensed

Provide the number of students who have been certified or licensed as teachers, by subject and area of certification or licensure.

Teaching subject/area

Number certified/ licensed 2008-09

Number certified/ licensed 2007-08

Number certified/ licensed 2006-07

TOTAL (all areas/subjects)

 

 

 

We cannot obtain this information from the Public Education Department (PED).

We cannot obtain this information from the Public Education Department (PED).

Section I.e Program Completers

Provide the total number of initial teacher certification preparation program completers in each of the following academic years:

2008-09: 95

2007-08: 103

2006-07: 92

Section II. Annual Goals

Each institution of higher education (IHE) that conducts a traditional teacher preparation program (including programs that offer any ongoing professional development programs) or alternative routes to state certification or licensure program, and that enrolls students receiving Federal assistance under this Act, shall set annual quantifiable goals for increasing the number of prospective teachers trained in teacher shortage areas designated by the Secretary or by the state educational agency, including mathematics, science, special education, and instruction of limited English proficient students. IHEs that do not have a teacher preparation program in one or more of the areas listed below can enter NA for the area(s) in which the IHE does not have that program.

Teacher shortage area

Goal for increasing prospective teachers trained

Mathematics

Academic year: 2008-09

Goal: 3

Goal met? Yes

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

Aggressive recruitment, School of Education scholarships, and financial aid packages.

Description of steps to improve performance in meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Advisement and support are critical. We have a strong tutoring program and a laptop lending program in the School of Education for our students.

Science

Academic year: 2008-09

Goal: 6

Goal met? Yes

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

Aggressive recruitment, School of Education scholarships, and financial aid packages.

Description of steps to improve performance in = meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Advisement and support are critical. We have a strong tutoring program and a laptop lending program in the School of Education for our students.

Special education

Academic year: 2008-09

Goal: 10

Goal met? Yes

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

A full-time faculty was hired, providing stability to the SPED program. Aggressive recruitment, School of Education scholarships, and financial aid packages.

Description of steps to improve performance in = meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Advisement and support are critical. We have a strong tutoring program and a laptop lending program in the School of Education for our students.

Instruction of limited English proficient students

Academic year: 2008-09

Goal: 16

Goal met? Yes

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

A full-time faculty was hired, providing stability to the SPED program. Aggressive recruitment, School of Education scholarships, and financial aid packages.

Description of steps to improve performance in meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Advisement and support are critical. We have a strong tutoring program and a laptop lending program in the School of Education for our students.

Other

Academic year:

Goal:

Goal met?

Description of strategies used to achieve goal:

Description of steps to improve performance in meeting goal or lessons learned in meeting goal:

Provide any additional comments, exceptions and explanations below:

Section II. Assurances

Please indicate whether your institution is in compliance with the following assurances.

Training provided to prospective teachers responds to the identified needs of the local educational agencies or States where the institution=C3=A2=E2=82=AC=E2=84=A2s graduates are likely to teach, based on past hiring and recruitment trends.
Yes

Training provided to prospective teachers is closely linked with the needs of schools and the instructional decisions new teachers face in the classroom.
Yes

Prospective special education teachers receive coursework in core academic subjects and receive training in providing instruction in core academic subjects.
Yes

General education teachers receive training in providing instruction to children with disabilities.
Yes

General education teachers receive training in providing instruction to limited English proficient students.
Yes

General education teachers receive training in providing instruction to children from low-income families.
Yes

Prospective teachers receive training on how to effectively teach in urban and rural schools, as applicable.
Yes

Describe your institution=C3=A2=E2=82=AC=E2=84=A2s most successful strategies in meeting the assurances listed above:

Assurance #1: The Dean and Gallup Chair meet with Superintendents; survey their needs, as does the Director of Field Experiences at both the Gallup and Silver City sites. The Dean is in constant communication via email with the area superintendents and their associate superintendents. The employer and graduated student surveys as well as EBI surveys all help us to determine and address the identified needs of the students we serve.

Assurance #2: Effective 2007, the SOE Silver faculty became the Lead Clinical Faculty or University supervisors of student teachers/practice teachers. Since that period, there is a much closer alignment between needs of the schools and the instructional decisions new teachers face in the classroom and what faculty are teaching in their courses. The theory and praxis are more closely aligned and faculty continue to address competencies. The faculty in Gallup have been supervising the student teachers since 2000.

Assurance #3: Our prospective special education teachers must graduate with a minimum of two endorsement areas, one of which is in Language Arts and the other of their choice in Mathematics, Social Studies, or Science. They graduate with a minimum of 30-36 hours in the endorsement area with a minimum of 12 credit hours at the 300-400 level for certification purposes.

Assurance #4: Our general education teachers receive training in providing instruction to children with disabilities at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Everyone is required to take SPED 408/508: Introduction to Special Education in the Contextual Knowledge core and SPED 428/528: Curriculum and Methods in Special Education in the Application and Reinforcement core.

Assurance #5: Our general education teachers receive training in providing instruction to limited English proficient students in a minimum of two mandatory classes: BLED 414/514: Multicultural Education and BLED 445/545: ESL Methods for Content Literacy.

Assurance #6: Our general education teachers receive training in providing instruction to children from low-income families by addressing the SOE Program Outcomes and the State Competencies in all of their coursework. These competencies are: Classroom Management and the Learning Environment, Student Development and Advocacy, Diversity and Quality of Life, Family, School/Community Interaction and Communication Skills. Furthermore, their Unit plans must accommodate these student differences.

Assurance #7: Our prospective teachers receive training on how to effectively teach in urban and rural schools, as applicable. Although, the majority of the schools and students we serve are in rural areas, faculty prepare the students for both geographic areas. In our teacher preparation programs, we also address the rural indigenous populations we are serving in the states of NM and Arizona.

Section III. Assessment Rates

Assessment code - Assessment name
Test Company
Group

Number
taking
test

Avg.
scaled
score

Number
passing
test

Pass
rate
(%)

State
Average
pass rate
(%)

State
Average
scaled
score

1 -Basic Skills 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

66 

 

65 

98 

 

 

1 -Basic Skills 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

63 

 

61 

97 

 

 

35 -Educational Administrator 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

35 -Educational Administrator 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

11 -Elementary Ed 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

25 

 

25 

100 

 

 

11 -Elementary Ed 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

28 

 

28 

100 

 

 

28 -Health Education 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

16 -History Geo. Econ. Civics Govt. 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

16 -History Geo. Econ. Civics Govt.  =
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

12 -Language Arts 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

12 -Language Arts 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

14 -Mathematics 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

14 -Mathematics 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

29 -Physical Education 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

29 -Physical Education 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

34 -School Counselor 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

34 -School Counselor 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

15 -Science 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

15 -Science 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

20 -Spanish 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

20 -Spanish 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

32 -Special Education 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

32 -Special Education 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

 

 

 

 

 

5 -Teacher Competency-Early Childhood  =
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

3 -Teacher Competency-Elementary 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

33 

 

33 

100 

 

 

3 -Teacher Competency-Elementary 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

35 

 

35 

100 

 

 

4 -Teacher Competency-Secondary 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

25 

 

25 

100 

 

 

4 -Teacher Competency-Secondary 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2007-08 

19 

 

19 

100 

 

 

31 -TESOL 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

22 -Visual Arts 
Evaluation Systems group of Pearson 
All program completers, 2008-09 

 

 

 

 

 

Section III. Summary Rates

Academic Year

Number taking one or
more required tests

Number passing
all tests taken

Pass Rate
(%)

Statewide average
pass rate
(%)

All program completers, 2008-09 

81 

80 

99 

 

All program completers, 2007-08 

78 

74 

95 

 

Section IV. Low-Performing

Provide the following information about the = approval or accreditation of your teacher preparation program.

Is your teacher preparation program currently = approved or accredited?
Yes

If yes, please specify the organization(s) = that approved or accredited your program:
State
NCATE

Is your teacher preparation program currently = under a designation as "low-performing" by the state (as per section = 207(a) of the HEA of 2008)?
No

Section V. Technology

Does your program prepare teachers to:

  • integrate technology effectively into curricula and instruction
    Yes
  • use technology effectively to collect data to improve teaching and learning
    Yes
  • use technology effectively to manage data to improve teaching and learning
    Yes
  • use technology effectively to analyze data to improve teaching and learning
    Yes

Provide a description of how your program prepares teachers to integrate technology effectively into curricula and instruction, and to use technology effectively to collect, manage, and analyze data in order to improve teaching and learning for the purpose of increasing student academic achievement. Include a description of how your program prepares teachers to use the principles of universal design for learning, as applicable. Include planning activities and a timeline if any of the four elements listed above are not currently in place.

A.) The WNMU SOE prepares pre-service and in-service teachers to integrate technology effectively into curricula and instruction by requiring all undergraduate and graduate students take EDUC 402: Computers in the Classroom and EDUC 534: Integration of Technology into Curriculum. These courses are taught by a full-time tenure track faculty with public school experience. Furthermore, our TEP (Teacher Education Program) outcomes align with the state Technology competencies which are aligned with ISTE standards.

B. C. and D.) The WNMU SOE prepares pre-service and in-service = teachers to use technology effectively to collect, manage, and analyze data to improve teaching and learning by requiring all students in the undergraduate and graduate programs to take the following depending on their program of study:

Early Childhood ECED 225 and ECED 325 Assessment of Children & Evaluation of Programs I and II.

Elem. Educ. EDUC 414/514 Elementary Instructional Planning and Assessment

Movement Sciences K-12 Pedagogy (Physical Education EDUC 474: Classroom Assessment and MVSC 408: Assessment in Movement Sciences

Sec. Educ. - EDUC 474/574: Classroom Assessment

SPED SPED 454/554: Evaluation and Assessment of Exceptional Children

RDG RDG 411/511: Corrective Reading Instruction; RDG 412/512: Diagnosis and Prescription of Reading to Diverse Learners; and RDG 415/515: Remedial Reading.

Universal Design for Learning: All of the faculty have had professional development in UDL. This is very appropriate given the high number of ELL/SPED/rural poor students our students will be serving or are currently serving. They incorporate the following principles in their Curriculum classes: Identify the essential course content. Clearly express the essential content and any feedback given to the student. Integrate natural supports for learning. Use a variety of instructional methods when presenting material. Allow for multiple methods of demonstrating understanding of essential course content. Use technology to increase accessibility. (CAST: NATIONAL CENTER ON UNIVERSAL DESIGN FOR LEARNING).

Section VI. Teacher Training

Does your program prepare general education teachers to:

  • teach students with disabilities effectively
    Yes
  • participate as a member of individualized education program teams
    Yes
  • teach students who are limited English proficient effectively
    Yes

Provide a description of how your program prepares general education teachers to teach students with disabilities effectively, including training related to participation as a member of individualized education program teams, as defined in section 614(d)(1)(B) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and to effectively teach students who are limited English proficient. Include planning activities and a timeline if any of the three elements listed above are not currently in place.

I. Our program prepares our general education teachers in providing instruction to children with disabilities at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Everyone is required to take SPED 408/508: Introduction to Special Education in the Contextual Knowledge core and SPED 428/528: Curriculum and Methods in Special Education in the Application and Reinforcement core. Our faculty teach differentiated instructional strategies, incorporate UDL principles in their curriculum classes, and address the TEP (Teacher Education Program) and PED (Public Education Department) competencies. Our general education teachers receive training in providing instruction to limited English proficient students in a minimum of two mandatory classes: BLED 414/514: Multicultural Education and BLED 445/545: ESL Methods for Content Literacy.


Does your program prepare special education teachers to:

  • teach students with disabilities effectively
    Yes
  • participate as a member of individualized education program teams
    Yes
  • teach students who are limited English proficient effectively
    Yes

Provide a description of how your program prepares special education teachers to teach students with disabilities effectively, including training related to participation as a member of individualized education program teams, as defined in section 614(d)(1)(B) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and to effectively teach students who are limited English proficient. Include planning activities and a timeline if any of the three elements listed above are not currently in place.

II. Our program prepares special education teachers to teach students with disabilities, prepares them to be a part of the IEP team, and to effectively teach ELL students in the following:

RDG/SPED 412/512. Diagnosis and Prescription of Reading for Diverse Learners. This course identifies theoretical and practical aspects of using formal and informal diagnostic procedures; selecting appropriate test batteries, prescribing instructional materials, and using appropriate teaching techniques based upon individual diagnosis will be emphasized. Writing Intensive.

SPED 428/528. Curriculum and Methods in Special Education. Provides teachers of students with disabilities with basic background in methods, materials, IEP, and curriculum development; emphasizes the analysis and selection of curricula, instructional methods, and the use of materials in the educational process for children with

disabilities; 30 hours of field work are required during this course. Writing Intensive.

SPED 452/552. Families, School, Community Relations and the Exceptional Child. Prepares special education teachers to work effectively with the parents of children with special needs by providing information on a variety of issues dealing with parent-teacher relationships. Some of the issues are: collaboration and system coordination, conferencing skills, assertiveness training, problem solving, establishing open communications, working with community agencies, discipline and legality.

Writing Intensive.

SPED 456/556. Culturally Diverse Exceptional Children. Theory and practice in bilingual/multicultural special education, with emphasis on language, culture, assessment practices, and learning styles of exceptional bilingual children. Writing Intensive.

SPED 470/570. Nature and Needs of Persons with Learning Disabilities. This course provides teachers with information which will assist them to understand the nature of learning disabilities from an interdisciplinary perspective. The focus will be on the identification, characteristics, and education of children with learning disabilities. Writing Intensive.

III. Our special education teachers receive training in providing instruction to limited English proficient students in a minimum of three mandatory classes: BLED 445/545: ESL Methods for Content Literacy; RDG/SPED 412/512. Diagnosis and Prescription of Reading for Diverse Learners; SPED = 456/556. Culturally Diverse Exceptional Children. Theory and practice in bilingual/multicultural special education, with emphasis on language, culture, assessment practices, and learning styles of exceptional bilingual = children.

Section VII. Contextual Information

Please use this space to provide any additional information that describes your teacher preparation program(s). You may also attach information to this report card. The U.S. Department of Education is especially interested in any evaluation plans or interim or final reports that may be available.

University Mission: Western New Mexico University (WNMU) is an open admissions institution serving the multicultural populations of New Mexico, other states and other nations as a regional comprehensive university with an additional community college role. While research and public service are important undertakings of the institution; teaching and learning are preeminent at WNMU. We are a University that believes in the promise of every student, and together we work to create an educational community of diverse backgrounds, perspectives and talents that instills the values and develops the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare our students for the challenges of a changing world. Western New Mexico University, a Hispanic-serving institution has a long history of teacher preparation going back to its inception as a Normal School in 1893 and has continued to remain a catalyst for teacher education in the southwest. School Mission: The purpose of the School of Education (SOE) is to ignite and nurture a spirit of learning for both educator and student. This purpose is based on a five-part philosophy, which stresses the following: 1. Educators recognize, accept, value, and promote diverse ideas, languages, and cultures. 2. Educators stress quality programs that are aligned with professional and state standards that produce exemplary results. 3. Educators integrate theoretical knowledge into the world of practice through field-based experiences and reflection. 4. Educators possess the skills and knowledge to effectively collaborate with parents, professionals both within and across schools and agencies, and community stakeholders. 5. Educators advocate for equitable access to and model thoughtful, effective, integrated use of technology resources. The School of Education offers undergraduate and graduate degrees and programs in teacher education at the initial level in: Early Childhood Education; Elementary Education; Secondary Education Movement Science K-12 Pedagogy; Career and Technical Teacher Education; Special Education and Double Major Degrees in: Elementary Education and Music; Secondary Education and Art; Secondary Education and Math; Secondary Education and Music; Secondary Education and Science with Biology and/or Physical Science Concentrations and at the advanced level in: Elementary, Secondary, Special Education, Reading, Counseling, Educational Leadership, and School Psychology. All of our programs are state and nationally NCATE accredited and we have received national recognition. We received the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) Best Practice Award in Support of Teacher Education Quality and Accountability. We are scheduled for our state and national NCATE reaccreditation visits in April 2011 and chose to pilot the NCATE Continuous Improvement Track. The Institutional Report for Pilot Visits following the Continuous Improvement option and the electronic documents room will be ready for review by the NCATE BOE (Board of Examiners) by October 30, 2010. The WNMU School of Education is concerned about the discrepancies or inaccuracies in the pass rates uploaded by Westat as provided by our state. Section 1.D. Provide the number of students who have been certified or licensed as teachers, by subject and area of certification or licensure. WNMU's SOE could not obtain this information from the Public Education Department (PED).

Supporting Files

Title II Report Card

Western New Mexico University
Traditional Program
2008-09